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Old 08-30-2010, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Pleasantville, NY
113 posts, read 260,661 times
Reputation: 47

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I've been reading up on the benefits of Zinsser's Gardz on sealing/priming the walls after wall paper removal.

I have a question... from what I've been reading, one should remove wall paper, clean, etc, and then apply Gardz, then spackle, and then... what? Apply primer and then paint?

The reason I ask is because I've pulled down the wall paper, cleaned the walls, and then spackled all of the holes, dings and scraps. I did this to the small bathroom and I had peeling - I had removed wall paper, cleaned, spackled and then primed with regular drywall primer. After I primed the small bathroom and painted, I noticed the paint started to bubble in a couple of places. After reading up about Gardz, I learned that I didn't properly seal it because those spots probably still had glue on the dry wall.

Not wanting to repeat that again with a much larger room, which will be my office, did I screw up the order? Or worse, did I simply screw up?

Now that the 'damage' is done, and I've spackled damaged dry wall, what next? Can I continue with Gardz? Do I apply one coat or two, before painting?

Thanks!!
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Old 08-30-2010, 07:54 PM
B4U
 
Location: the west side of "paradise"
3,563 posts, read 4,168,001 times
Reputation: 4207
Just my experience, I never use water based products on new or damaged areas. I don't want to have to cross my fingers if a product will work or not or worry I'll have to re-do it.
For your bath I would have used BIN primer-sealer. It's a white pigmented shellac.
I buya throw- away roller and brush to use. The clean up is denatured alcohol and the primer dries amazingly fast. Faster than latex/acrylic paint.
Also, while using it, stir frequently. Then you can apply your favorite water-based top coat on.

Or, if you prefer, the best primer I have ever come across is XIM, which is an oil-based primer-sealer Again, I buy throw-away brush and roller, clean up is mineral spirits, and it dries as fast as water-based paint. Then you can apply your favorite water-based top coat paint. This primer is alittle expensive for primers, but is worth every cent in my book. It never fails.

Both come in aresol cans as well.

Just my 2 cents. I wouldn't use the same product again, even if it's in a different evironment.

good luck.
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Old 08-30-2010, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
605 posts, read 2,111,423 times
Reputation: 863
Gardz is a fantastic product! I use it after removing wallpaper, to seal in damaged drywall and glue residue left behind after washing. Then, I spackle, sand, and repeat as necessary until the wall is perfectly smooth. Finally, another coat of gardz, then primer and paint.

For your bathroom, if you just have a couple small problem areas, then I would consider sanding and applying gardz only to those areas. If you have huge patches of peeling/bubbling paint, then I would consider sanding the entire walls and applying gardz everywhere (basically starting over).

No need to use oil-based products for this project!
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Old 09-11-2012, 09:09 AM
 
2 posts, read 34,557 times
Reputation: 13
Necessary to prime after repairs?
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Old 09-11-2012, 09:12 AM
 
2 posts, read 34,557 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Franks painting View Post
Necessary to prime after repairs?
Anyone know if a regular primer over the gardz will work then paint
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Old 09-11-2012, 03:24 PM
 
2,304 posts, read 3,657,999 times
Reputation: 3425
The X_I_M reminds me of the old shellac method of priming/sealing. It would be my pick of the bunch but I'm old school and this stuff is hot. Meaning you need to have LOTS of ventilation as it is combustible. Dry time is going to be quick, real quick. And the throw away tools are almost a requirement. But there's no doubt it'll work the first time. Do all repairs then prime/seal that way the substrate is all the same for the finish coat.
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Old 09-25-2012, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Pleasantville, NY
113 posts, read 260,661 times
Reputation: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Franks painting View Post
Anyone know if a regular primer over the gardz will work then paint
The original reason I made my post was for my home office. I learned some lessons from doing the half bath downstairs, without using Gardz. Here's what I did with my office:
- Peeled off the world's most hideous wall paper.

- Wiped down the walls several times (we used fabric softener to help peel off the wallpaper. Took weeks to get that smell out)

- Spackled. Patched up all of the small dents and gashes that we made while ripping down the old wallpaper. We used putty knives and there were several holes made into the drywall.

- Sanded down the patches, making the walls even and smooth.

- Applied one coat of Gardz. It's the consistency of milk, just about. I bought two cans of it, thinking that I would need to put it on thick and do two coats. After realizing how thin it is and that only one coat was necessary, I returned the other can.

- I forget the drying time (I did this two years ago), but I think I gave it a day. After the Gardz had dried, I applied one coat of drywall primer. I decided just to go with Sherwin Williams' regular drywall primer. not the best, but since the walls were already white, I didn't need something to help cover up a previous color. I've seen other stores have theirs up against SW's and show that SW's not to be a good product, but for me, it did the job.

- Then two coats of paint.

Not a single bubble has formed and it has become the best paint job I've done in my whole house. The end result looks great - I impressed myself!

So comparing my wallpaper fiasco between the half-bath and my office, Gardz definitely helped! Several bubbles appeared in the half-bath, due to me not applying Gardz to seal-up the patches and damage made from the wallpaper removal. Lesson learned.

BTW, I never thanked everyone for their posts!
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Old 09-25-2012, 09:32 PM
 
2,737 posts, read 1,157,411 times
Reputation: 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadioGuy93 View Post
I've been reading up on the benefits of Zinsser's Gardz on sealing/priming the walls after wall paper removal.

I have a question... from what I've been reading, one should remove wall paper, clean, etc, and then apply Gardz, then spackle, and then... what? Apply primer and then paint?

The reason I ask is because I've pulled down the wall paper, cleaned the walls, and then spackled all of the holes, dings and scraps. I did this to the small bathroom and I had peeling - I had removed wall paper, cleaned, spackled and then primed with regular drywall primer. After I primed the small bathroom and painted, I noticed the paint started to bubble in a couple of places. After reading up about Gardz, I learned that I didn't properly seal it because those spots probably still had glue on the dry wall.

Not wanting to repeat that again with a much larger room, which will be my office, did I screw up the order? Or worse, did I simply screw up?

Now that the 'damage' is done, and I've spackled damaged dry wall, what next? Can I continue with Gardz? Do I apply one coat or two, before painting?

Thanks!!
Even after you've done everything you can do to get wallpaper adhesive removed, there are tiny remnants - and they will cause problems.

That's where Gardz comes in. It's a great product for what it's designed to do.

Get everything as smooth & clean as you can. Spackle any imperfections. Roll on Gardz Primer - two coats of you want to be obsessive. Paint, with 2 coats.


I've never had anything but excellent results doing things in that order.
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