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Old 02-10-2011, 06:20 PM
 
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When I get my oil tank filled I see that one of the elbows for the fill pipe has a slight trickle. Any idea how to stop this leak?
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Old 02-10-2011, 06:24 PM
 
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Default Threaded pipe?

Have your tried a wrench?
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Old 02-10-2011, 08:08 PM
 
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Maybe ask a GM Mechanic. They should be very familiar with oil leaks.
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Old 02-10-2011, 09:46 PM
 
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How slight? Couple drips or a gallon?

Something like that is one of those things you might be better off leaving alone unless it's a lot.
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Old 02-11-2011, 06:18 AM
 
76 posts, read 636,469 times
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It's a drip that doesn't accumulate on the ground. It looks like a streak. Could I try putting plumber's putty around the exposed threads?
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Old 02-11-2011, 09:35 AM
 
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Default Normal thread sealants are unlikely to work...

95% of threaded fittings are designed for water, and thus most "pipe dope" and similar sealants are designed only to be resistant to water.

There are industrial sealants that are designed to be resistant to fuel oil and hydraulic fluid, but to get these to "bond" you would need to completely de-grease the pipe threads, which may be impossible.

There are inexpensive mechanical "pipe repair clamps" that MIGHT be worth trying, but unless you can find one that has a "fluorinated silicone" gasket layer the fuel oil will eventually dissolve the gasket. The petroleum industry uses that material to repair leaks at refineries and such, but generally only in sizes that are so large that replacing the pipe would prove incredibly costly / times consuming...
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