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Old 02-24-2012, 11:28 AM
 
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I don't know that the Brady house is a good example because the "inside" certainly does not match the outside. The Brady house on the inside is just a 2 story house, from the outside, however, around here, there would be at least 3 separate levels, usually 4, in a house that looks like that. It would be called a "multi-level" house. You would walk into the living room and off one side of the living room would be stairs going up to the bedroom level and stairs going down to a family room level (probably 6-8 stairs each way).

Here a "split-level" you walk into an "entry way" and immediatly there is a split stairway with 6-8 stairs going up and 6-8 stairs going down. On the upper level you usually have a living room, eating area, kitchen and a couple bedrooms. On the lower level you usually have a family room and a couple bedrooms.

Ranch or raised ranch are not terms commonly used here. A "ranch" here would be a rambler, meaning everything was on one level with or without a basement.
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Old 02-24-2012, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
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First two are a-typical split-level homes.
Second two are split-foyers
And the last is called a back-split- like a regular split level but longitudinally perpendicular to the street.
Attached Thumbnails
House: upper story extends over lower (mid century ranch)-s500.jpg   House: upper story extends over lower (mid century ranch)-great_oconee_location-3_bd_2_ba_split-level_home_15589569.jpg   House: upper story extends over lower (mid century ranch)-split_01_large.jpg   House: upper story extends over lower (mid century ranch)-splitlevel.jpg   House: upper story extends over lower (mid century ranch)-21_ba7767370_0.jpg  

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Old 02-24-2012, 12:59 PM
 
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In SoCal that would be called a split-level ranch.
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Old 02-24-2012, 01:03 PM
 
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DUDE, that is a SPLIT LEVEL, in fact the picture is of perhaps the most famous fictional TV family's house ever: Studio City's most famous fictional architect lived here
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Old 02-24-2012, 01:03 PM
 
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Thanks for all the info. I thought they might be "southwestern" because cartoonist Bil Keane used to draw them a lot, and I know he lived in Arizona. But I also saw a recent news report from either Idaho or Oregon and I could see them in the background. There was a whole neighborhood of them and it looked like flat ground. So maybe they are also "northwestern"?

(No, the interior of the "Brady" house is NOT this style. That was done as a half-baked surreal design, based on the exterior pic.)
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Old 02-24-2012, 03:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
First two are a-typical split-level homes.
Second two are split-foyers
And the last is called a back-split- like a regular split level but longitudinally perpendicular to the street.
Around here the first two would be called a tri-level or multi-level, the second two would be split levels the last one I don't know that I've seen a house like that around here.
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Old 02-24-2012, 06:35 PM
 
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To me, the split level has 3 levels and the split foyer had a small foyer with stairs up and down.

I remember split levels from the early 60s on but saw a split foyer first in 1971 or so.

We lived in a hilly area so these were common, along with the basement ranch.
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Old 02-25-2012, 02:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OzzyRules View Post
Does anyone know the name of this type of house? I was wondering if it had a name. This picture from the Brady Bunch is the closest one I could find, but it's not perfect because it's kind of difficult to see.

Some houses are split level, built on a hill. Others have a partial 2-story on level ground.

http://www.gigacities.com/World/Unit...nch/DVD560.JPG
In SoCal split levels are built on flat land as well as in hilly areas.

Looking at that photo the house would typically have the living room, dining area and kitchen off to the right. (The "flat" portion of the house.) The left portion upstairs would contain bedrooms and bathrooms. The left portion downstairs would have a "rumpus" room or additional bedroom and bathroom.
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Old 02-25-2012, 10:31 PM
 
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Ya, in my neck of the woods they were usually called tri-levels. I looked at a few when we were housing hunting years ago. Some of them didnt have bad lay outs and others did. Most we looked at, when your walked in the door you were on the main level of the home. It consisted of the living room and maybe a kitchen. A small staircase of just a few steps took you to the level where the bedrooms were. Then another set of steps from the main floor took you to the lower level where maybe a family room was located. Those set ups weren't bad but I did see some that had the kitchen in the lower level or the living room. Sometimes a bedroom. I think split levels had the worst floor plans as you were faced with a set of stairs going up or down as soon as you walked in the door. The living spaces were divided in an odd way. Depending on the neighborhood, the houses could be a hard sell.
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Old 02-26-2012, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Kansas City North
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In the 1980s in Kansas City, something called a "front-to-back" split was popular. You entered on one level, where the living room was located. Up a half flight to the kitchen and dining area (usually overlooked the living area). Bedrooms were on that level, or sometimes a half flight above that. Half a flight down from the entry level was the garage. Half a flight below THAT (under the living room) was a rec room. If you didn't like stairs, this was NOT a house to buy.
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