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Old 05-28-2012, 12:09 PM
 
Location: North Burb Chicago
357 posts, read 3,205,881 times
Reputation: 302

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Looking to put up a privacy fence in our backyard using small Evergreens (trees?).
Not sure if Evergreen is the correct term to use.
Shrubs? Trees?

Something like this:




For those that have or put up a privacy fence using Evergreens, what problems if any did you run into with your neighbors?
If you live in an HOA, did you need the permission of the HOA?
In my area, we don't need a city permit. Not sure if I need HOA permission.
I'd have to look into that.

I'm not looking to put up anything exaggerated, like 20 ft trees.
8-10 ft trees/evergreens that won't grow taller both in height and width.
Just enough to divide the yards and give some privacy.
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Old 05-28-2012, 01:14 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
25,586 posts, read 55,252,762 times
Reputation: 26892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi5 View Post
Looking to put up a privacy fence in our backyard using small Evergreens (trees?). Something like this:
-- nice picture of a 20 year old installation of conifers--

Quote:
I'm not looking to put up anything exaggerated...
Just enough to divide the yards and give some privacy.
Japanese privet could work nicely.

It's still gonna take *years* to see your result
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Old 05-28-2012, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
36,599 posts, read 35,355,633 times
Reputation: 68534
You need to check your HOA covenants.

Then check the plat map of your property to be sure you don't plant them on or over your neighbor's property line.

Not sure if they will thrive where you live, but we've done this successfully with Leyland cypress. They fill in pretty quickly.
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Old 05-28-2012, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,196,981 times
Reputation: 6499
You can buy arborvitae (as pictured above) from Lowe's or Home Depot and most nurseries. You can purchase more mature plants that will give you a good start on a green screen. Arborvitae are subject to bagworms and spider mites and will tolerate partial shade but most varieties prefer full sun and will grow the quickest in full sun, rich, well drained soil and watering once a week or so during the summer. Once established they are pretty indestructible except for bagworms/spider mites. I'd buy bigger plants to start with because they can be slow growing if the conditions are not ideal (like part shade/clay soil). You certainly do not need to wait 20 years for a beautiful green hedge like the one shown - just buy bigger plants to start with.

There are aborvitae that will reach 30 feet and there are other varieties that will only grow 10 to 15 feet - there are also dwarf varieties and hundreds of varieties in all shapes and sizes. Rather than wait for bagworm damage (which can be swift and deadly), spray with the appropriate spray in early spring before the bagworms appear...this is what we do with our Alberta Spruces (aka filet mignon to bagworms)....we spray just before they usually appear and this seems to kill them before they can do any damage.

Last edited by Cattknap; 05-28-2012 at 05:24 PM..
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Old 05-28-2012, 06:08 PM
 
Location: North Burb Chicago
357 posts, read 3,205,881 times
Reputation: 302
Thanks for the suggestions!

Yeah, I wasn't sure what the correct term was to use and I guess still don't but you guys got the idea. I just say evergreens because that's the only one I know.

I'm going to find one for our weather here in Chicago.
Not looking for anything to go 30ft. I'll be happy with a 10ft max height.
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Old 05-28-2012, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
30,521 posts, read 55,731,053 times
Reputation: 50924
Just make sure you plant them well inside your own property line! I know it should go without saying, but sometimes you just wonder what people were thinking ...

I couldn't imagine a neighbor being upset about it.

I used lilac bushes to screen my side yard from the front yard and the street. They're not evergreens, but in three years they've grown to about six feet high.
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Old 05-29-2012, 12:26 AM
Status: "You meet the nicest people on CD..." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
37,993 posts, read 43,361,121 times
Reputation: 103859
First check with your HOA to see what is allowed and to let them know what you plan to do. They will probably give you some reccomendations that they approve of. Then go to a local Garden Center and see what's available for your area that will survive the 4 seasons. Thuja Arborvitae are very slow growers as mentioned above. If you do plant them, or any other plant, make sure you know what the mature size will be and plant accordingly to stay inside your ppty line. Also you may need to check for any utility easements down your ppty line before you even start so you won't have any problems there. If you dig without getting utility clearance and dig down and create a problem, you are liable for the damage.
You may want to check other varieties like the cypress family also. The local Garden Center would be your best bet for proper information for your area. Ask for a Certified Nurseryman for the correct information and not just any clerk working there.
We recently planted a tree. We had to get HOA approval, show them the exact spot to be planted and let them know the mature size it was going to grow to. Then we called the utility company for marking the utility lines in the area. After that we got final approval from the HOA and bought our tree and planted it.
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Old 05-29-2012, 01:10 AM
 
6 posts, read 34,611 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi5 View Post
Looking to put up a privacy fence in our backyard using small Evergreens (trees?).
Not sure if Evergreen is the correct term to use.
Shrubs? Trees?

Something like this:




For those that have or put up a privacy fence using Evergreens, what problems if any did you run into with your neighbors?
If you live in an HOA, did you need the permission of the HOA?
In my area, we don't need a city permit. Not sure if I need HOA permission.
I'd have to look into that.

I'm not looking to put up anything exaggerated, like 20 ft trees.
8-10 ft trees/evergreens that won't grow taller both in height and width.
Just enough to divide the yards and give some privacy.
those arborvitae in your pic are perfect. they don't get super wide and are hearty. if you are trying to block something high though it won't help because obviously it's an evergreen and gets more skinny at the top.
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Old 05-29-2012, 08:23 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,428 posts, read 34,503,372 times
Reputation: 38738
I have seen many an arborvitae not winter well... heavy snows can bend the and/or split them in two. Guess it depends on where you live, but many here in my area either avoid them or end up replacing damaged ones.
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Old 05-29-2012, 08:31 AM
 
1,642 posts, read 2,192,821 times
Reputation: 4484
I planted eldarica pine trees over 30 yrs ago, 8 feet on center as recommended. It was fine until they were about 20 yrs old then the lower branches started to die off and there went my privacy. Also, despite placing them about 5 feet within my property, they are now so large, one of my neighbors has been cutting branches off them (permissable) and now I'm afraid that will kill those trees. Possible-not probable. Check the growth rate on the arbovitae, etc. you may be dead and buried before the trees get big enough to do any good! (my problem ha ha!) Good luck.
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