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Old 10-15-2012, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Indiana
305 posts, read 478,522 times
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Looking for a home in NW Indiana and most all I have looked at do not have double pane windows. Seems like this would be a must to have since Indiana gets very cold winters! I remember the house I grew up in located in Illinois and we had DP windows there...
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Old 10-15-2012, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
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The age of the homes is usually a good indicator as to those that have and those that don't.
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Old 10-16-2012, 01:26 AM
 
34,332 posts, read 34,423,143 times
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New windows can significantly decrease energy usage, I had some customers cut their coal usage in half with windows and a little insulation.
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
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Age and price range I suspect is at play here. Mostly you would just figure that you'd need to replace them, but if the house is really old you might have appearance issues. Typical replacement windows don't look right on some styles of houses. When I looked at a house built in the 20s I think it was, the owners through the years had chosen not to replace the original windows. Meanwhile my house built in 1983 had the windows replaced in 1999. (Found the date on part of the windows.)
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Old 10-16-2012, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,540 posts, read 2,701,748 times
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Just a point about what we do in Canada.

Each of the 10 Provinces has a "energy conservation " program, that offers a 40 percent rebate if you install new TRIPLE pane windows in your house, up to a 5 thousand dollar maximum.

They must be super rated, and "made in Canada ". Most are fiberglass frames, with argon inert gas between the panes, and they are UV reflective, and guaranteed for thirty years.

Same type of program for super efficiency gas furnaces ( Canada has more proven natural gas supplies than any other place in the world, and we supply the USA with about 40 percent of your natural gas needs,too ) and water heaters, and toilets.

Even though we , as a country, are sitting on huge amounts of oil and natural gas, we are really trying to limit the amount that we use. Rewarding home owners for reducing their energy consumption, is smart, in my opinion.

Jim B

Toronto.
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:22 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
23,876 posts, read 51,372,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ranosb View Post
Looking for a home in NW Indiana and most all I have looked at do not have double pane windows.
Do they have storm windows?
Allow $200 -$250 per opening for a basic DH replacement.
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:42 AM
 
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Argon inert gas. I first heard about that a few days ago while house hunting. Sounds like something they'll eventually decide causes cancer.
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Old 10-16-2012, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,918 posts, read 18,280,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
Argon inert gas. I first heard about that a few days ago while house hunting. Sounds like something they'll eventually decide causes cancer.
Nah, argon is an element, not some crazy manmade mixture. Of course so is radon. And I don't know if what goes in the windows is pure argon or just mostly argon.

Regular incandescent light bulbs have been filled with gas since Edison's day. (That was one of the breakthroughs if I remember right. You couldn't always get a decent enough vacuum by getting all the air out, but if you filled the thing with an inert gas you got pretty much the same effect.) In regular bulbs it's apparently argon maybe with some nitrogen in. Krypton and xenon are also used (and hyped; remember krypton bulb flashlights? Xenon was (is?) hyped in car headlights.)

Anyway, I'm not sure what the argon gains over just having air in there, maybe not much insulation-wise, but often getting rid of oxygen is useful for certain purposes. That's what the argon or argon/nitrogen would do.
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Old 10-16-2012, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 28,698,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg42 View Post
Nah, argon is an element, not some crazy manmade mixture. Of course so is radon. And I don't know if what goes in the windows is pure argon or just mostly argon.

Regular incandescent light bulbs have been filled with gas since Edison's day. (That was one of the breakthroughs if I remember right. You couldn't always get a decent enough vacuum by getting all the air out, but if you filled the thing with an inert gas you got pretty much the same effect.) In regular bulbs it's apparently argon maybe with some nitrogen in. Krypton and xenon are also used (and hyped; remember krypton bulb flashlights? Xenon was (is?) hyped in car headlights.)

Anyway, I'm not sure what the argon gains over just having air in there, maybe not much insulation-wise, but often getting rid of oxygen is useful for certain purposes. That's what the argon or argon/nitrogen would do.
My husband was a glazier for many years, he says its pure argon....also, nitrogen is used.
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Old 10-16-2012, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
14,864 posts, read 21,830,768 times
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triple pane windows?????????????


are you kidding, we have enough problems with regular double pane getting the freaking condensation in between the glass, never mind having another pane to worry about.


I don't what anyone says, I am from the old school. regular windows with storm windows worked for centuries, just more to wash that's it.

i hate the double pane windows. i have had so much aggravation from the steam in the glass, the bronze fading, the springs popping.


never had this problem with the older windows,
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