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Old 01-08-2013, 12:12 PM
 
Location: SoCal
180 posts, read 359,213 times
Reputation: 153

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Hi all,

I have hard water that created very thick layer on my dishwasher heating element. I flaked about 20% of it off but the remaining stuff is baked on hard. I'm not sure if it is calcium or lime or whatever.

Is there a way of getting this off so I don't have to purchase a new heating element?


thanks!!!!!!!!
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:37 PM
 
2,091 posts, read 2,631,124 times
Reputation: 1962
Dishwasher Magic Dishwasher Cleaner & Disinfectant - Best Price
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:40 PM
 
Location: SoCal
180 posts, read 359,213 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by wireyourworld View Post
Thanks, but I already ran two bottles of that. It did work on cleaning, but it wasn't strong enough to clean the element.

The calcium/lime is rock hard and really baked on. Any other suggestions?
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:49 PM
 
2,319 posts, read 3,702,810 times
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You can put a cup of vinegar in with the load of dishes and it will eventually remove all of the lime deposits. It won't hurt most dishes but don't use anything like it with fine china. If your machine has the plastic coated wire racks, any compromise in the plastic is going to result in rust making the machine worthless for fine china so I'd inspect it fairly close before using anything in the machine to remove the deposits. You could use the vinegar with the racks removed if you like. We use it here at least once a month as we also have hard water. Vinegar also works great for keeping commodes flushing right. I put a cup in the tank water and let it sit overnight. I put about a quart down the overflow to get the deposits out of the flushing system as well and let that sit overnight. Keeps the deposits from building a ring around the water line. I usually buy the cheapest 9% vinegar at Walmart. It something like 2 bucks a gallon. Vinegar also makes the best window cleaner diluted in half.
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:58 PM
 
Location: SoCal
180 posts, read 359,213 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrapperL View Post
You can put a cup of vinegar in with the load of dishes and it will eventually remove all of the lime deposits. It won't hurt most dishes but don't use anything like it with fine china. If your machine has the plastic coated wire racks, any compromise in the plastic is going to result in rust making the machine worthless for fine china so I'd inspect it fairly close before using anything in the machine to remove the deposits. You could use the vinegar with the racks removed if you like. We use it here at least once a month as we also have hard water. Vinegar also works great for keeping commodes flushing right. I put a cup in the tank water and let it sit overnight. I put about a quart down the overflow to get the deposits out of the flushing system as well and let that sit overnight. Keeps the deposits from building a ring around the water line. I usually buy the cheapest 9% vinegar at Walmart. It something like 2 bucks a gallon. Vinegar also makes the best window cleaner diluted in half.
Thanks. I'll try that. Do I use just vinegar? Or add the soap as well? i don't mind running an empty load if I have to.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:02 PM
 
4,005 posts, read 3,465,726 times
Reputation: 6139
Quote:
Originally Posted by mandK View Post
Hi all,

I have hard water that created very thick layer on my dishwasher heating element. I flaked about 20% of it off but the remaining stuff is baked on hard. I'm not sure if it is calcium or lime or whatever.

Is there a way of getting this off so I don't have to purchase a new heating element?


thanks!!!!!!!!
I had the same exact problem. I used Dishwasher Magic three times, and it did not help at all. I used vinegar several times. Finally I tried Lemmishine, and it worked! It removed the thick layer of baked on lime and crud the first time.

I purchased the LemmiShine at the grocery store, but it is also available at hardware stores. The grocery store employee told me that they can't keep it in stock, so many people use it.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:08 PM
 
Location: The Triad (nc)
17,721 posts, read 24,057,602 times
Reputation: 14934
Quote:
Originally Posted by mandK View Post
I have hard water that created very thick layer on my dishwasher heating element.
That's just what you can see.
There is a similar accumulation inside the pump and likely all your other plumbing too.
Are you doing anything about the root cause (bad water)?
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:59 PM
 
786 posts, read 654,638 times
Reputation: 1136
Best I've found is a product called CLR. Available at most hardware and large grocery stores.

CLR® Calcium, Lime and Rust Remover

Recognized for safer chemistry. Blasts calcium deposits from glassware, tile, tea and coffee pots. Dissolves lime scale from coffee pots, humidifiers, tubs, toilets and sinks. Zaps rust stains from stucco, brick, porcelain, chrome and metal. CLR is a powerful formula for dissolving tough calcium and lime deposits and surface rust stains from tubs, toilet bowls, sinks, glass, chrome, fiberglass and stainless steel. Septic safe.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:59 PM
 
Location: SoCal
180 posts, read 359,213 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by missik999 View Post
I had the same exact problem. I used Dishwasher Magic three times, and it did not help at all. I used vinegar several times. Finally I tried Lemmishine, and it worked! It removed the thick layer of baked on lime and crud the first time.

I purchased the LemmiShine at the grocery store, but it is also available at hardware stores. The grocery store employee told me that they can't keep it in stock, so many people use it.
Thanks!! Which Lemishine product did you use? They have a few.
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Old 01-08-2013, 02:08 PM
 
Location: SoCal
180 posts, read 359,213 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
That's just what you can see.
There is a similar accumulation inside the pump and likely all your other plumbing too.
Are you doing anything about the root cause (bad water)?
nope.
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