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Old 02-17-2013, 03:09 PM
 
502 posts, read 849,044 times
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Hi all,

I've got an outdoors faucet that is leaking up close to the mouth of the spigot (just a little bit higher than where a water hose would be screwed in). I tried using that epoxy putty stuff to cover the little leak but it didn't work, so I'm thinking of replacing the spigot. It has the appearance of something that could be undone via a wrench but when I try to twist with a wrench, it's totally un-movable. So it makes me wonder if it was welded instead (or maybe I'm just not muscular enough being a rather slight female)? If so, what would it entail to fix this myself or get this fixed? My guess is, if it's welded, it would entail using some sort of electric saw(which I don't have and don't want to buy!) to chop off the spigot, then re-weld a new spigot on there.

Anyhow, does this sound like a job for a plumber? If so, would this be considered pretty routine and hopfully not too expensive? Any thoughts or advice would be greatly appreciated!

Here are a few supplemental photos, in case it helps:
Attached Thumbnails
Leaking Outdoor Faucet: DIY-able or not?-678a0626-600x800-.jpg   Leaking Outdoor Faucet: DIY-able or not?-678a0627-600x800-.jpg  
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Old 02-17-2013, 04:03 PM
 
27,139 posts, read 60,338,866 times
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First you got to get your terminology straight -- pipes for household water are NEVER welded. If a torch was used to join them the terms "soldered" or "sweated" are used. Pronunciation is tricky -- in "solder" the L is silent, in "sweated" it sounds like the past tense of what happens when you go to the gym on hot day...

The spigot is threaded. It appears to have brass fitting that ought to be able to unscrewed with appropriate tools.

You need TWO of these -- one on the fitting and another on the spigot. Long handle is key for leverage... http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005STKV9S/...SIN=B005STKV9S

Last edited by chet everett; 02-17-2013 at 04:11 PM..
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Old 02-17-2013, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
36,549 posts, read 38,616,722 times
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If in doubt save a costly headache, call a plumber.
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Old 02-17-2013, 04:54 PM
 
8,513 posts, read 11,464,233 times
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Does it leak with the red valve shut off? If not, why bother?
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Old 02-17-2013, 05:38 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
22,391 posts, read 48,092,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xica_da_Silva View Post
I've got an outdoors faucet that is leaking...
Everything is fixable.
The Q is whether the time and money is better spent to replace it.

Go to the store and find a "boiler valve". (pic below)
Look at it very closely; especially how the rubber seat washer closes up the inlet.

Then buy the valve and replace the whole thing.
You'll need TWO wrenches. One for the valve and one for the fitting behind it.
Attached Thumbnails
Leaking Outdoor Faucet: DIY-able or not?-brass-boiler-valve-tl-2111238.jpg  
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:00 PM
 
502 posts, read 849,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
First you got to get your terminology straight -- pipes for household water are NEVER welded. If a torch was used to join them the terms "soldered" or "sweated" are used. Pronunciation is tricky -- in "solder" the L is silent, in "sweated" it sounds like the past tense of what happens when you go to the gym on hot day...

The spigot is threaded. It appears to have brass fitting that ought to be able to unscrewed with appropriate tools.

You need TWO of these -- one on the fitting and another on the spigot. Long handle is key for leverage... Amazon.com: Reed RCORP 2-Inch Smooth Jaw Corp Wrench: Home Improvement
Thanks for the info, Chet. It's funny you mention soldering because I have in fact heard the term before; just didn't know the difference between 'welding' vs. 'soldering'. Learning is good!

Yeah...since there's a nut there it makes sense that it would be threaded. I've got one adjustable wrench that would be the appropriate size somewhere in a hidden drawer...just need to find it! I'll also need to get a 2nd wrench- I can probably borrow one from a friend. And then hopefully get some good 'leverage'. I figure since it's such a basic thing to replace, I might as well try to do it myself, and then if I still can't get it unscrewed I'll ask one of my friends for help. Plus, I like doing things for myself...it's fun!
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:04 PM
 
502 posts, read 849,044 times
Reputation: 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Does it leak with the red valve shut off? If not, why bother?

Good question. It doesn't leak unless the valve is turned on; but I frequently use a garden hose, so I'd like for it to work properly.
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:07 PM
 
502 posts, read 849,044 times
Reputation: 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Everything is fixable.
The Q is whether the time and money is better spent to replace it.

Go to the store and find a "boiler valve". (pic below)
Look at it very closely; especially how the rubber seat washer closes up the inlet.

Then buy the valve and replace the whole thing.
You'll need TWO wrenches. One for the valve and one for the fitting behind it.

Thanks, looks like you and cheteverett are on the same page. I'm going to give it a try!

Oh, and just to clarify, the leak is weird. It's actually a tiny hole just above the threads where the hose attaches...so definitely the whole spigot needs replacing. It makes me wonder- is this the original that came with the house way back in 1949?! lol It kinda looks that way!
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
10,205 posts, read 39,280,981 times
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Looking at your pics and comparing to your description-
And the follow up of the valve itself, I'm pretty sure I know what the problem is.

The faucet has an anti-siphon device attached to it and the washer inside has deteriorated allowing water to bi-pass. Considering it doesn't leak when it's off and the location of your epoxy band-aid.

Just remove the anti-siphon from the faucet, remove the washer (if there's anything left of it), insert new washer (same kind used for hoses), re-install. You guys should look at the pics again-closely.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:11 AM
 
8,513 posts, read 11,464,233 times
Reputation: 7821
Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
The faucet has an anti-siphon device attached to it and the washer inside has deteriorated allowing water to bi-pass.
Winner, I think. The reason I suggested not bothering is I've found outside faucets _always_ leak there. I hadn't realized it's an anti-siphon device, but it makes sense.
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