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Old 02-18-2013, 08:04 AM
 
Location: New Hampshire
1,137 posts, read 1,114,293 times
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It's been particularly cold these past few weeks so I've repalced all the original weather around my windows and caulked the casings yet I still feel slight drafts. the home is only 12 years old with vinyl windows but it pains me to think I'm not doing all that I can to save every penny onheating costs.

Has anyone tried the using the shrink wrap that you apply with a hair dryer? My wife is concerned that it damage the window trim but I've heard it's very effective at reducing heat loss.

Any adivce or stories you can share would be appreciated.

Thanks
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Old 02-18-2013, 08:07 AM
 
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I've switched to this product. It's available at places like Lowe's and/or Home Depot.
http://www.amazon.com/18324-Seal-Removable-Caulk-10-1-Ounce/dp/B0002YVNOQ

It's a caulk that you fill the cracks with in the fall and when spring comes, it just peals right off.

it's similar to the caulk they use to attach a credit card to a piece of paper before mailing. When you get it, you just peal the stuff right off.

Be advised: Whatever you seal won't open until the sealer is removed. E.g. If you seal up a couple sides of a window, it won't open until/unless the sealer is removed. Consider fire escapes and such before sealing everything up.
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Old 02-18-2013, 08:26 AM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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Thanks Ryan but I can't see using that stuff on the actual window itself. I get drafts from the meeting rails (where the upper and lower sashes meet), on the sides of the windows and at the bottom.

I have literally caulked and weatherstripped the you know what out of the windows but still get drafts.

I kind like the idea of using the shrink wrap that you heat because I've heard that it is truly air tight and very effective.

The only concern I have is that I don't want to damage the trim when I peel it off in the spring.

If anyone can speak to that I'd be grateful.
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Old 02-18-2013, 08:47 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
25,469 posts, read 55,120,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Declan's Dad View Post
I get drafts from the meeting rails (where the upper and lower sashes meet),
on the sides of the windows and at the bottom.
A modern design window shouldn't do this.
There should be a far better fit and gaskets.
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:42 AM
 
Location: New Hampshire
1,137 posts, read 1,114,293 times
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Well I live in New Hampshire and up this way there are a lot of Colonial homes that are pretty much cookie cutter homes (which is what we have). It's a nice home but they are built by contractors who use cheap "contractor grade" supplies for everything, including the windows.

I guess it's in how you define draft too. When I say draft I don't mean you can literally feel the air flowing in with any great force. Some of the windows were sort of like that before I did the weatherstripping but are now much better. it's just that I can still feel very subtle slight drafts. Sometimes when I put my hand around the window I don't even know if it's a draft or just a temperature change from having my hand so close to the window. I have to get my wife and ask her to check it, that's how slight it is.

The point is heating oil in New England is very expensive. I'm a dad and a frugal sob. So I want my house completely airtight. the fact that I may be losing even a few dollars to preventable heat loss drives me crazy.
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:46 AM
 
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To check for drafts, instead of using your hand, use a candle or lighter. Look for the flames moving.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:05 AM
 
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The shrink wrap works, it's just ugly, leaves a residue, and can remove paint if you have a wood trim. It sounds like maybe you just have crappy windows. If it's just one or two windows where you feel a draft you should probably check to see if they're broken; the latches which hold the window in the track can break, the seals can peel off, etc.
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
23,552 posts, read 57,518,496 times
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We have used both seal and peel and the shrink wrap stuff. Both work.

Seal and peel smells horribly when you do all the windows at once. Sometimes it will pull paint off the windows, but not usually. You caulk all of the joints and anywhere air comes through with it. In the spring, you just grab it with needle nose pliers and pull it off. SOmetimes little bits stick and you have to work them out.

The tape for the shrink wrap does damage your moling both painted or stained. If you had somehting metal or plastic to tape it to, it would be better. If it does not pull off pait of clear coat, it leaves tape residue which is hard to remove without damaging the finish. Once you get it heated and shrunk you can see it fill like a sale. It does a good job keeping the drafts out. Towards the end of winter, sometimes parts of the tape will let go. also kids and cats may damage the plastic and then you have to replace it. It is impractical to re-use it.

We are slowly buting interior storm windows. Basically a wooden frame with lexan panel in it. That seems to be the best solution. Also, over time, we are reconditioning the windows. UNless they are really old (like pre-civil war), they were not made to leak. If they leak something is wrong.
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