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Old 03-03-2013, 04:58 AM
 
Location: Canada
1,063 posts, read 627,433 times
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This question is for someone who is knowlegable in solid surface countertops/kitchen sink installation.

We are just in the completion stage of building a new house and we had this kitchen sink installed on our island http://www.kindred-sinkware.com/grfx...KSC1LUA_9D.pdf

We didn't want granite or marble, (I don't like the busy look of them), so we went with a solid surface countertop. We had our countertop company come to measure the countertop and they had our sink for correct sizing.

I'm not sure if you can see it in the photo, but there is a beveled edge around the sink at the top edge. The MAIN reason that I wanted an under mount sink is to eliminate the guck that collects around the edge of sinks that sit on TOP of the counter.

Yesterday, I was at our new house cleaning and noticed that the countertop is not hanging totally over the edge of the sink. It only comes up to the beveled edge and the beveled edge is exposed. This leaves a place for gunk to collect and I'm still going to have to scrub where the beveled edge and countertop meets. Crumbs and liquids will land on that beveled edge until I wipe it down and I'm not a happy camper.

NOTE: our bathroom sinks have the same solid surface countertops and they were installed with a clean drop to the sinks.

Is the countertop not supposed to hang completely over my kitchen sink edge or did they cut it this way for a reason, or did they possibly cut the hole too large?

At this stage, there isn't much we can do about it now, but I wanted to ask before we talk to our countertop company.
Thanks, Ann
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Old 03-03-2013, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Cold Springs, NV
4,576 posts, read 2,886,836 times
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Self rimming vs undermount. I'd take self rimming any day over undermount for daily use reasons. However, design, and eye appeal doesn't make common sense and always agree. Personally, I'd have used a solid surface sink with a smooth round over finish.
Your comments on the bathrooms are vague (almost on purpose), so to equate them to the kitchen is difficult. If the bathrooms were porcelain, or stainless the edge would be the same as the kitchen if used in an undermount fashion
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Old 03-03-2013, 09:22 AM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,196 posts, read 3,472,898 times
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A stainless steel sink that is undermounted in a solid surface, quartz, marble, granite, or any such top is going to have either what is called a negative or positive reveal. It is impossible to mount that type of sink so that it is perfectly smooth like you can with an "integral" solid surface (acrylic) sink.
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Old 03-03-2013, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,835 posts, read 21,956,687 times
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Check the demensions with the manufacturer's recommendations-

KINDRED - Cad Cutouts/DXF Files

If the demensions aren't correct- then you have a legitimate gripe. Otherwise, it's your personal preference over manufacturer's specifications.
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Old 03-04-2013, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Canada
1,063 posts, read 627,433 times
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Thank you for your answers! Much appreciated.

rrteckno, I realize that it couldn't be perfectly smooth because the sink is not "part" of the countertop and because of the bevelled edge. I was just wishing that the bevelled edge had been slightly under the rim, not exposed to crumbs and such. Either way, I realize that I'd have to scrub the edge, but would have involved less cleaning if it was tucked under.
(I'm a woman who keeps the ease of cleaning in mind)

These are the bathroom sinks I have. LAVATORY UNDERCOUNTER 15-3/8 W/ SANAGLOSS, BONE, LT193G#03 - Decor Island

See how the rim goes over the edge of the bowl? That's what I expected for my kitchen sink also.

K'ledge: the link doesn't work, but thanks!
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Old 03-04-2013, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,835 posts, read 21,956,687 times
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Well actually, the link works. You just have to have DXF software to read it.

However, after a little more digging I found this-
http://www.kindred-sinkware.com/grfx...s/UM_kc1&2.pdf

Read the first bullet-

Then scroll down to see the diagram. It would appear that the installer installed it correctly.
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Old 03-04-2013, 08:54 AM
 
239 posts, read 345,656 times
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Either way you have moved the area where the gunk builds up from the counter/sink edge to under the counter rim. If the counter top overhangs the sink you have a hidden edge that needs to be cleaned. If the sink is larger than the opening at least you can see the gunk on the sink rim. 6 of 1, 1/2 dozen of the other.

With all the food prep we do in the sink I prefer a drop in sink so that when I clean it I know the entire food prep area is clean and the only hidden gunk is on the counter top.
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:55 AM
 
21,724 posts, read 37,184,337 times
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Drop-in never looks as nice as undercount. For cleanliness an integrated sink is the too choice but given what I know seeps past / under a drop in the second choice is far and away an undermiunt.

One of the less reported issues with "apron front" sinks is the inevitables gaps that can get quite yucky if the sides are not done as undermount...

Folks forget that not just synthetic solid surface sinks and counters can be integrated -- I have seen unified stainless steel integrated sinks and countertops which have a very industrial feel in appropriately style homes, custom built integrated soapstone sinks that look terrific in lots of homes including arts & crafts / missions style and general farmhouse kitchens, and even custom all wood countertops and sinks that have been appropriately constructed out of natural durable species -- people seem to forget that with proper care ships that are hundreds of years old do fine with their wooden planking exposed to much harsher environments than one encounters in a home kitchen!
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Old 03-04-2013, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Canada
1,063 posts, read 627,433 times
Reputation: 2197
K'ledge, thanks! That is what I was looking for on the kindred site and couldn't find it... something that states how it is supposed to be installed.

Ok, I'll be wiping the gunk every day

Thanks for all your replies! appreciated
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Old 03-04-2013, 10:21 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,196 posts, read 3,472,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
Drop-in never looks as nice as undercount. For cleanliness an integrated sink is the too choice but given what I know seeps past / under a drop in the second choice is far and away an undermiunt.

One of the less reported issues with "apron front" sinks is the inevitables gaps that can get quite yucky if the sides are not done as undermount...

Folks forget that not just synthetic solid surface sinks and counters can be integrated -- I have seen unified stainless steel integrated sinks and countertops which have a very industrial feel in appropriately style homes, custom built integrated soapstone sinks that look terrific in lots of homes including arts & crafts / missions style and general farmhouse kitchens, and even custom all wood countertops and sinks that have been appropriately constructed out of natural durable species -- people seem to forget that with proper care ships that are hundreds of years old do fine with their wooden planking exposed to much harsher environments than one encounters in a home kitchen!
While it is true that you can "integrate" almost any type of sink into a top, it is required that the materials be the same. (Stainless Steel and Stainless Steel, Stone and Stone, Quartz and Quartz, etc. although some are not truly integral) it is not possible to have fully integral sink/countertop with dissimilar materials (Solid Surface and Stainless Steel or Porcelain, Laminate and Acrylic, etc.)
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