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Old 11-02-2007, 03:05 PM
 
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When we had our new furnace/AC installed the workmen advised us to leave the blower on 24/7. This helps keep the room temperatures even and calls for heat and air are fewer. We also use ceiling fans running at a slow speed.

Seems to be working. I'm sure part of it is the increased efficiency of both units and the fact that they put in a slightly larger AC unit, but the lower bills sure are nice! Should pay for itself in about 5-6 years. Sooner if natural gas prices keep going up.

Oh, yeah. Spring and fall: No furnace, no air. some summers we can go quite while without. Most winters - heat and fireplace.

Central Iowa.

Last edited by Tek_Freek; 11-02-2007 at 03:14 PM..
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Old 07-16-2008, 12:09 PM
 
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Question -- the electric companies state to save money on your electric bills during the summer to set your thermostat up as high as you can stand it -- have done this

But they also say to leave the blower running all the time as in setting it to on instead of auto ~~ this keeps the air circulating like a giant whole house fan which keeps the house from getting too hot when the compressor kicks off when it is set to auto.

Has any one tried this advise or tip or whatever and seen a difference in your bills. Wondering if it is bull from the electric companies trying to pull suckers in and get more money or if this makes sense and would work -- any thoughts on this??
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Old 07-16-2008, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
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As a resident of SE Texas I can certainly empathize. My electric bills in the summer are ridiculous. My inclination used to be to turn the thermostat up to 90 degrees during the day while my wife and I were away, but this is a no-no in high humidity environments as it encourages mildew and fungus proliferation. Even if you aren't at home you should avoid setting the thermostat beyond about 78 degrees. That way you can control your costs and the A/C still cycles enough to adequately dehumidify your home (assuming your A/C unit is properly matched to your house). If you really want to lower your bills you probably need to eliminate all of your windows and fill your attic with expanding foam.
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:39 PM
 
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The moisture saturates everything in the home if allowed to enter. You then have to dry all that out. If it's not extremely humid (if that even happens in Florida) every degree you turn down the stat you save anywhere from 1-3% off your HVAC electrical usage.


Just a few things to consider:

How much of a setback?
How humid it is?
What time will the system come back on?
How much mass does your home have?
How old is it?
How tight is it?
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:42 PM
 
27,903 posts, read 34,368,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3BearMom View Post
Question -- the electric companies state to save money on your electric bills during the summer to set your thermostat up as high as you can stand it -- have done this

But they also say to leave the blower running all the time as in setting it to on instead of auto ~~ this keeps the air circulating like a giant whole house fan which keeps the house from getting too hot when the compressor kicks off when it is set to auto.

Has any one tried this advise or tip or whatever and seen a difference in your bills. Wondering if it is bull from the electric companies trying to pull suckers in and get more money or if this makes sense and would work -- any thoughts on this??

Your coil is below the dew point so it removes moisture from the air. leaving your fan in the on position will humidify the air so basically....

You pay to take the moisture out...then you pay to put it right back.

This is different for two/multiple speed systems.
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:44 PM
 
27,903 posts, read 34,368,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
When we had our new furnace/AC installed the workmen advised us to leave the blower on 24/7. This helps keep the room temperatures even and calls for heat and air are fewer. We also use ceiling fans running at a slow speed.

Seems to be working. I'm sure part of it is the increased efficiency of both units and the fact that they put in a slightly larger AC unit, but the lower bills sure are nice! Should pay for itself in about 5-6 years. Sooner if natural gas prices keep going up.

Oh, yeah. Spring and fall: No furnace, no air. some summers we can go quite while without. Most winters - heat and fireplace.

Central Iowa.

Fan on in heat...okay...not so much in A/C unless a multiple stage unit.


If the unit is correctly sized going slightly up and seeing it cut on and off more is not a good thing.

If the system is running correctly then on design temp days the A/C should run almost the entire day...if not all day. Smaller system running all day is better than a large system running partially.....the longer the run times the more efficient the system is....once it cuts on about 5 minutes into the cycle is when you start getting your efficiency....It's called steady state or the system has equalized.
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindsey_Mcfarren View Post
I was talking to the electrician friend of mine who fixed my AC and he was saying in an area like this where it gets so humid, the thought is that if your wanting to turn it off at night and then on again during the day, you probably won't save any money because the humidity is so bad now.

There are times later in the winter where this is not the case and the AC can stay off.

While my AC wasn't working, it was so humid in here it felt like you could have picked up a peice of paper and gotten water to drip out of it.

I also LOVE fresh air but I can't stand being hot. I work at night so I sleep during the day and it has been getting VERY hot in the house, even with fans and windows open.

My other concern has been security. There was a home in my neighborhood that was broken into because they left their windows open at night.

I am hoping to have one of those nice screen doors put on the front door of my home so I can leave the front door open and get MORE of a breeze from the front to the back. For now I have three windows that I can open. In this area of Florida, its still getting pretty warm during the day and VERY humid to leave the windows open all the time.

I am just thankful the only thing wrong with my AC was the capasitor and not the compressor. I sleep best when its COOL in my room and I know I am going to sleep really well tonight.

Make sure the coils are clean. You can spray the outside unit with the water hose but the inside unit is a little more tricky. Make sure you aren't using pleated filters unless your system was designed to.
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Old 07-17-2008, 04:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
This summer, I installed a whole house fan and ceiling fans in 2 bedrooms. I also put in spacers to push the insulation down in the attic so the air flows more freely thru the soffits.

Just for future reference compressing insulation lowers the R value. Maybe the added airflow offset that change.
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Old 07-18-2008, 02:35 PM
 
27,903 posts, read 34,368,633 times
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I meant up of course....turn the stat up. sorry for any confusion.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJon3475 View Post
The moisture saturates everything in the home if allowed to enter. You then have to dry all that out. If it's not extremely humid (if that even happens in Florida) every degree you turn down the stat you save anywhere from 1-3% off your HVAC electrical usage.


Just a few things to consider:

How much of a setback?
How humid it is?
What time will the system come back on?
How much mass does your home have?
How old is it?
How tight is it?
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Old 04-30-2010, 02:01 PM
 
1 posts, read 8,897 times
Reputation: 10
Have window air conditioner that runs all the time blowing cold air. Won't shut down,just keeps blowing cold air
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