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Old 11-12-2007, 11:43 AM
 
694 posts, read 1,815,989 times
Reputation: 296
Default Shower low water pressure (private well)

Just moved into my lovely new home but the shower water pressure is not so lovely. I am on a private well and the pump is rated 60 psi. Anything I can do to improve this? New showerhead? Remove the 2.5 gpm limit thingy?
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Old 11-12-2007, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,321 posts, read 18,881,290 times
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remove the restrictor and you'll be in bizness!
I will warn you though- some can not be removed.
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Old 11-12-2007, 12:08 PM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 8,258,854 times
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Welcome to life on a well. My tank is set to 30-50 psi. You don't get city water pressure on a well, you just get used to working around it. I think the restrictors help to get a better spray with the lower pressure. But different fixtures will vary in how well they work on well water pressures.
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Old 11-12-2007, 03:22 PM
 
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Do you have a filter that is inline with your pump before it gets to your house?.....if that is new or you don't have one removing the flow control device will help.
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Old 11-12-2007, 07:26 PM
 
4,285 posts, read 9,735,200 times
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You need to determine if your problem is localized to the shower, or if it is a whole house issue.


Is the water pressure acceptable at the kitchen and bathroom faucets?

If yes, then your problem lies in the shower head. Your pressure reduction could be a result of a flow restrictor, or it could just as easily be mineral buildup within the shower head itself. Many wells produce water with high mineral content that can quickly plug the fine orifices of shower heads, coffee makers, etc. Try taking the shower head off and submerging it in vinegar for 24 hours. Reinstall and see if there is any improvement.

If you have pressure issues throughout the house and have a filter somewhere in your intake line, check that the filter isn't clogged.

Just because a pump is rated for 60 psi, that is no assurance your actually getting 60 psi.

Pumps operate off a pressure switch which turns the pump on at a pre-determined low pressure level and then turns the pump off when a pre-determined high pressure is reached within the pressure tank. Pressure switches are general set so as to have a 20 psi difference between on and off. In other words, your switch make turn the pump on when pressure drops to 40 psi and allow the pump to run until 60 psi is attained.

Look for a pressure gauge attached to either your pump head or to your pressure tank. Run a tap until the pump cycles on. Note the reading on the gauge when the pump kicks on. Shut off the tap and allow the pump to fill the tank. Note the gauge reading when the pump shuts off. These 2 readings will tell you what your actual working range is. If you wish to have higher pressure, most pressure switches are easily adjusted by simply turning a nut. Merely experiment with your readings using the above method until your desired cut in and cut out is reached. Don't elevate your maximum pressure above 60 psi; it's unnecessary and will only make your pump work harder.
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Old 11-13-2007, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,184 posts, read 17,853,887 times
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Great advice, Cornerguy1, I'm facing this problem now, and doing lots of checking. I'm about to get a new filter to see if that might solve some of the problem(s).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cornerguy1 View Post
You need to determine if your problem is localized to the shower, or if it is a whole house issue.


Is the water pressure acceptable at the kitchen and bathroom faucets?

If yes, then your problem lies in the shower head. Your pressure reduction could be a result of a flow restrictor, or it could just as easily be mineral buildup within the shower head itself. Many wells produce water with high mineral content that can quickly plug the fine orifices of shower heads, coffee makers, etc. Try taking the shower head off and submerging it in vinegar for 24 hours. Reinstall and see if there is any improvement.

If you have pressure issues throughout the house and have a filter somewhere in your intake line, check that the filter isn't clogged.

Just because a pump is rated for 60 psi, that is no assurance your actually getting 60 psi.

Pumps operate off a pressure switch which turns the pump on at a pre-determined low pressure level and then turns the pump off when a pre-determined high pressure is reached within the pressure tank. Pressure switches are general set so as to have a 20 psi difference between on and off. In other words, your switch make turn the pump on when pressure drops to 40 psi and allow the pump to run until 60 psi is attained.

Look for a pressure gauge attached to either your pump head or to your pressure tank. Run a tap until the pump cycles on. Note the reading on the gauge when the pump kicks on. Shut off the tap and allow the pump to fill the tank. Note the gauge reading when the pump shuts off. These 2 readings will tell you what your actual working range is. If you wish to have higher pressure, most pressure switches are easily adjusted by simply turning a nut. Merely experiment with your readings using the above method until your desired cut in and cut out is reached. Don't elevate your maximum pressure above 60 psi; it's unnecessary and will only make your pump work harder.
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Old 11-25-2007, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,184 posts, read 17,853,887 times
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Well, changed the filter and cleaned the shower head yesterday morning. It may be too early to call but both seem to have improved the pressure.

Another question: how often should water filters be changed?

Thanks.
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Old 11-25-2007, 03:53 PM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 8,258,854 times
Reputation: 1984
Water filters depend on what kind and what is in your water. Check what the manufacturer says to start. If they are visibly dirty, change them sooner.

I have black sand that a basic filter grabs. It's pretty easy to tell when they need changing.
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Old 11-25-2007, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,184 posts, read 17,853,887 times
Reputation: 3674
Tesaje, what am I looking for? We have hard water, and a fairly high concentration of minerals. The filter I just removed didn't look much different than the new one (GE brand). I did have more of an indication with another water filter, elsewhere, and a recommendation for change time. Perhaps I'll be able to find the user guide for this one---somewhere.
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Old 11-25-2007, 04:14 PM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 8,258,854 times
Reputation: 1984
If it is just a basic sediment filter, how dirty it looks will tell you how often since its purpose is to trap particles before it gets to your pressure tank switch and or softener. Mine is that kind and with a clear housing, I can tell at a glance whether it needs changing - for me, about once a month. Not all of them have a clear housing which seems stupid to me. If it is a charcoal or fancier filter, then the manufacturer should tell you how often.
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