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Old 10-31-2013, 06:23 AM
 
2 posts, read 5,507 times
Reputation: 11
Default Dryer sheets in heating duct

I have a forced-air duct heating system. Can someone help settle a wager between a friend and I? Is it a good idea to place dryer sheets in the grilles to further reduce dust? My guess is no it's not a good idea because any added resistance to the airflow is a Bad Thing especially since the air is filtered at the furnace with a purpose-built filter and also who knows what they put in dryer sheets, do I want to be breathing that? My friend say is is a good idea - helps filter the air, makes the house smell good and doesn't affect airflow much.

Who's correct?
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:41 AM
 
Location: california
2,467 posts, read 984,768 times
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Any thing you add to the choke of the flow at a regester will reduce it to that area.If any thing ,a sheet at the furnace filter ,if you like the aroma but ai wouldn't cover the whole thing ,that would choke it too much altogether. by doing that you need to be dilligent in replacing it often because of the volume of air being drawn through it. Some systems might too detect that added sheet, as a dirty filter, because of the choke it would create. Either way it will reduce the effeciency of your system. As to the chemicals in the dryer sheet ,read the box an ask your self if you really want to breathe that.
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Florida
1,268 posts, read 482,325 times
Reputation: 3162
Bad idea. Your system is balanced for air flow (or should be!) and restricting the flow will make the system work harder.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
11,955 posts, read 9,230,096 times
Reputation: 20023
Your friends owes you $$.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,879 posts, read 9,213,749 times
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If you're going to do this, there is filter material made specifically for it. I even bought that kind of stuff one time, but I never ended up using it as a good central filter seemed like enough. Even the proper filter material will reduce the airflow somewhat at the register, which could introduce issues with the system or at least with maintaining the proper temps in some far off rooms. A forced air system is always going to blow around a little dust, whatever is in the air and whatever settles on some surfaces near the registers, and putting a filter over them won't change that part.

I would take off the register covers and clean out anything that is easily accessible there. And you can use a good central filter, or filters in the returns if it's set up that way. If serious problems in the ducts you can have them professionally cleaned. I can tell you I have serious dust allergy and have been fine with just replacing a good central filter (mine is at the furnace) every few months.

I stopped using dryer sheets altogether while back after reading about the kind of stuff that's in them. Maybe overblown, but I haven't missed them.

In terms of a wager, I'd definitely say you win.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:36 AM
 
2 posts, read 5,507 times
Reputation: 11
Thanks for the replies. You have some great forums here!
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,580 posts, read 20,171,909 times
Reputation: 5062
My answer comes with a price. How much of that wager you willing to sacrifice?








...that was a hint.
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:21 AM
 
3,343 posts, read 2,580,729 times
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Generally it is a good idea to use things for their intended purpose, not something else. And dryer sheets are used in a dryer which vents the air to the outside - the manufacturers of these may design the sheets with that in mind - they may add chemicals which they would not add if the air vented to the inside.

Same with insecticides. Some are designed for inside use, others for outside use.

Anyway if you want to filter your air at each return vent, buy vent returns which are designed to hold a filter. Then get A/C - Heating filters which are designed for that use. Like this...
http://www.gutowskicentralheating.co...ge018_0001.jpg

The following is a bit on filters specifically designed for A/C - Heating forced air use...
How to Choose an HVAC Air Filter | Angies List
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Old 10-31-2013, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,580 posts, read 20,171,909 times
Reputation: 5062
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy_J View Post
The following is a bit on filters specifically designed for A/C - Heating forced air use...
How to Choose an HVAC Air Filter | Angies List

That's pretty general sucky info- not surprising considering the source.

ASHRAE would be the authority on such matters-

ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010, "Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (covers other residential type buildings including high-rise) notes that filters designated with a minimum efficiency of MERV 6, or better, when testing in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 52.2-2007, shall be provided . Most residential systems are shipped from the manufacturer with a filter that has a MERV ranging from 1 and 4. This lower level of filter efficiency is selected to protect the heat exchanger and/or cooling coil from fouling debris with minimal initial expense. Higher levels of MERVs are possible. When upgrading the filter MERV a higher restriction to airflow must be considered. Most modern systems can accommodate this higher resistance, but you should consult with your HVAC equipment manufacturer for recommendations on the highest recommended level of initial filter resistance for your HVAC equipment.

...but like most things today the complete information is not free. Though if you dug hard and deep enough you could probably find a Word/PDF copy of it.

(note: finding the correct balance of MERV AND acceptable air restriction(s) can be rather involved.)
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Old 10-31-2013, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Looking over your shoulder
23,628 posts, read 15,511,910 times
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Nope! Never reduce the airflow! No dryer sheets in my air-ducts.
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