U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Unread 02-09-2012, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,813 posts, read 6,818,899 times
Reputation: 32676
Thanks for the leg work hunting down Zani, PatRoy. Seems this one is available only where sold locally.

I've used nothing except Bar Keeper's Friend for years. It is the best for cleaning sinks and pots/pans whether stainless, aluminum or copper bottom.

I acquired some aluminum loaf pans and an aluminum roasting pan recently at auction. Not the heavy, cast aluminum but the light weight kind. There was burnt on grease all over them. I set about scrubbing them--first with SOS pads, later with a small wire brush Dremel tool, and then finally with my cordless drill and a heavy wire brush. Progress was so slow that I finally gave up and decided I would use Easy Off and if I ruined it, I ruined it and I would just toss it. So I sprayed a small area of one pan with Easy Off and set it in the sink to soak for half an hour. When I came back, much to my surprise, almost all the burnt on grease came off very easily with a stiff brush, even what was in the cracks and creases. I even sprayed some stubborn areas more than once. I was afraid the harsh chemicals in Easy Off would eat through the aluminum but all it did was leave a dull stain, which, with a little scrubbing with an SOS pad, came off and brought back some of the original shine.

No idea how this would work on cast aluminum cookware such as Club but I will no longer have any hesitation to use it on any lighter weight aluminum loaf pans and roasters.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Unread 02-09-2012, 08:45 AM
 
703 posts, read 721,339 times
Reputation: 740
Looks like this thread is down to you and me. But appreciate all those who have posted along the way.

Not sure if ammonia would work on aluminum, but I have used this on crusted up oven racks with great success. I put the oven racks in a heavy duty black plastic bag, set it out in the driveway on a sunny, warm day and dump a cup or two of ammonia in, then close the bag and let the fumes work all day.

At the end of the day, I haul out the oven racks and hose them off. They may take a little scrubbing, but not much, to get all the crud off. But they come out sparkling clean.

Just a thought.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-10-2012, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,813 posts, read 6,818,899 times
Reputation: 32676
Good tip about the ammonia. I just spent an incredible three days cleaning some over racks. I sprayed them with Easy Off, let 'em set and then scrubbed. Did this several times over a 3 day period before they were clean. Must have gone through two cans of Easy Off and a whole box of SOS pads. Will do the ammonia/plastic bag trick next time I have some dirty oven racks to clean.

I'd like to talk detergents. I've been using Xtra, a cheaper brand from Walmart. My clothes are not especially dirty, except in the spring and summer when I've been on my knees in the garden, and, as far as I can tell, my clothes get just as clean with Xtra as they might with a more expensive brand. Is there really much difference between the nationally advertised brands like Tide, All, Purex, etc. and a cheaper brand?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-10-2012, 10:57 AM
 
703 posts, read 721,339 times
Reputation: 740
I've settled in on Tide. I don't use as much as they recommend but our things still get clean.

I've tried all types of detergent over the years. Nothing works as good as Tide as far as I can tell. Though I hear it is hard on septic tanks, not sure this is true.

What made the biggest difference however, was switching to a front loading washing machine. Friends of mine who own a B&B switched and reported that their clothes got so much cleaner, particularly his work clothes. They also reported a drop in the water bill and their towels lasted almost twice as long.

They used to buy new towels every spring as they like their guest towels looking fluffy and new and a year of washing in a top loader left them looking skimpy. With a front loader, their towels lasted two years easy.

We bought a front loader and I noticed that it doesn't take a load near as long to dry as the clothes are wrung out better when I put them in the dryer. Also, a lot less lint in the vent (which is probably why the towels last longer). I like to hang sheets out on the line and our front loader leaves them barely damp and easy to hang.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-10-2012, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Yellow Brick Road
34,048 posts, read 38,173,587 times
Reputation: 16962
I have tried every brand over the years. For some reason, Tide and Fab make me itch! Crazy, huh? So I settled on Gain about 10 years ago and have been very pleased with it, both in the liquid and the crystals.

I have started pouring my fabric softener on a washcloth - really saturating it - and throwing it into the dryer with the wet clothes, rather than using it in my washer. Seems to do great and continues to work for about 8-10 loads. Anyone else tried doing that? Someone had suggested it to me and it does seem to go further.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-10-2012, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
2,069 posts, read 1,749,344 times
Reputation: 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cunucu Beach View Post
Good tip about the ammonia. I just spent an incredible three days cleaning some over racks. I sprayed them with Easy Off, let 'em set and then scrubbed. Did this several times over a 3 day period before they were clean. Must have gone through two cans of Easy Off and a whole box of SOS pads. Will do the ammonia/plastic bag trick next time I have some dirty oven racks to clean.

I'd like to talk detergents. I've been using Xtra, a cheaper brand from Walmart. My clothes are not especially dirty, except in the spring and summer when I've been on my knees in the garden, and, as far as I can tell, my clothes get just as clean with Xtra as they might with a more expensive brand. Is there really much difference between the nationally advertised brands like Tide, All, Purex, etc. and a cheaper brand?
Here's another tip on cleaning oven racks. Put an old towel down on the bottom of your bathtub, place your racks in the tub. Turn the water on HOT, as hot as it will go, to completely cover the racks. Add 2 capfuls of laundry detergent, let it sit awhile (I let it sit overnight, even). When you wake up they should be completely clean, all you have to is dry them off. Hope this tip is helpful
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-14-2012, 06:26 AM
 
703 posts, read 721,339 times
Reputation: 740
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyegirl View Post
Here's another tip on cleaning oven racks. Put an old towel down on the bottom of your bathtub, place your racks in the tub. Turn the water on HOT, as hot as it will go, to completely cover the racks. Add 2 capfuls of laundry detergent, let it sit awhile (I let it sit overnight, even). When you wake up they should be completely clean, all you have to is dry them off. Hope this tip is helpful
Great idea. I've tried washing them in the tub before with SOS pads and what a mess.

Thanks to those who suggested Bar Keepers Friend cleanser. I cook with stainless steel pans as Ellen Sandbeck has convinced me that cooking with non-stick coated pans is not healthy. A good soaking usually helps to get the sauce pans clean, but the fry pans are another matter. The bottoms always end up with brown stains that I can't get out unless I scrub with an SOS pad and even then, it doesn't get all of it.

Anyway, this morning I was getting ready to put away a fry pan I'd made frittata in yesterday. My DH has given it a good scrubbing last night. Brown stuff still on the bottom.

I sprinkled Bar Keepers Friend and little water to make a paste. Let is sit while I made breakfast, and then cleaned it with a plastic scrubby.

Turned out beautiful. Shiny as brand new.

So, thank you. Whoever you are.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-14-2012, 06:53 AM
 
703 posts, read 721,339 times
Reputation: 740
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
I have tried every brand over the years. For some reason, Tide and Fab make me itch! Crazy, huh? So I settled on Gain about 10 years ago and have been very pleased with it, both in the liquid and the crystals.

I have started pouring my fabric softener on a washcloth - really saturating it - and throwing it into the dryer with the wet clothes, rather than using it in my washer. Seems to do great and continues to work for about 8-10 loads. Anyone else tried doing that? Someone had suggested it to me and it does seem to go further.
I don't care for the smell of Tide. Make my nose itch. I switched to an assortment of unscented detergents over the years but clothes never got as clean. Switched back when they came out with an unscented version. I'll try Gain next time I buy detergent.

As to fabric softener, I quit using it years ago when Ellen Sandbeck informed me that the chemicals used in fabric softener were toxic. She said that because they were not ingested, they were not required to be tested and approved for use around humans. She also told me that the chemicals melt in the heat of the dryer and coat the lint catcher, making it more difficult for the air to circulate and becoming a fire hazard. Plus, it made towels, etc. less absorbent.

Fabric Softener Dangers - Natural Life Magazine - green family living gives a rundown that is more than I cared to know.

I any case, I've not used fabric softener in years. Ellen, as well as the above website suggested adding a quarter cup of baking soda to the wash water or a quarter cup of vinegar to the rinse cycle. I've never done that, but guess I would if I thought our clothes were stiff. She also suggested throwing in a couple tennis balls to bounce around and soften things up. I think I did that couple times and then the dogs the tennis balls and I never got around to buying new ones.

Our mechanic in Minnesota suggested that we put a couple of sheets of Bounce up under the hood of our car to keep mice from building nests there. And I have used Bounce around our garage to keep the mice out.

Static cling has not been a huge problem as most of our stuff is cotton or rayon. Synthetic fabrics just feel funny to me. As I recall, the only pants I've ever had a problem "riding up" due to static cling were polyester dress pants. I tried using the trick of running the length of them with a wire coat hanger, but eventually just passed them on to Goodwill and bought some black jeans to wear to work.

I've heard that putting a safety pin in a couple wash clothes and throwing them in the dryer with your clothes will eliminate static cling. Also read that a quarter cup of vinegar in the rinse cycle, put it in the fabric softener chute of the washer, will eliminate static cling.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-14-2012, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,813 posts, read 6,818,899 times
Reputation: 32676
Bounce fabric softener will deter mice??? What a great tip. I'll spread some around--they always come in during the winter and chew up whatever they can find, especially in the basement.

Vinegar in the rinse water will clean out the residue from soaps--not really a huge problem with detergents, especially if you have soft water.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 03-08-2012, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Yellow Brick Road
34,048 posts, read 38,173,587 times
Reputation: 16962
Interesting info on the fabric softener sheets!

And yes - I have found vineger is like a miracle solution to so many household challenges. It does cut residue and works great.

I wanted to add a few new tips I have discovered and that aren't on this thread.

1. I had suggested using lemon oil (furniture polish type stuff) on fixtures as well as shower glass and tile to keep it from spotting - and also on stainless steel appliances. Well, a friend suggested using baby oil. I have had very good results using it and so wanted to pass that on.

2. This one blew me away. If you get house paint on clothing and it dries, it is pretty much a lost cause. At least, that has been my experience. I found out if you use rubbing alcohol, the stuff you buy at any pharmacy, and rub it into the paint stain (you may have to scrub it for a while!) and then wash in a regular load of wash . . . the stain may not completely come out but it will most likely get light enough that you won't notice it. I tried this on a shirt I have hung onto (denim) despite having some paint on it. That shirt has been washed maybe 20 times since the paint got on it and it just won't come out. One application of the rubbing alcohol and to my surprise - paint free! woot!

I hope those tips help someone out there!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $74,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:28 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top