U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-05-2008, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Peoples Republic of Cali
9,465 posts, read 4,429,008 times
Reputation: 5150
Default Best Building materials for Tornado Country

I was watching a tv show that talked about some kind of synthetic brick or something for Building in Kansas and places like that. it showed a big twister hitting a house, the house lost it's roof but was otherwise allright.
Any one know what it is ??
What do they build with where you live?? Here bricks are a no no cause of the earthquakes...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-05-2008, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Cookeville Tn.
177 posts, read 627,545 times
Reputation: 84
Take a look at ICFs insulated concrete forms. They stand up well in Tornado Country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-07-2008, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,321 posts, read 18,891,088 times
Reputation: 4779
The rest of the country is pretty much sticks & bricks.
Tornadoes are so unpredictable that it doesn't make much sense (or cents) to build a house a certain way because of tornadoes.
Hurricanes, and earthquakes are far more predictable as far as where!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-07-2008, 10:48 AM
 
3,021 posts, read 7,215,160 times
Reputation: 1558
Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
The rest of the country is pretty much sticks & bricks.
Tornadoes are so unpredictable that it doesn't make much sense (or cents) to build a house a certain way because of tornadoes.
Hurricanes, and earthquakes are far more predictable as far as where!
Spot on!

The likelihood that your home will be hit by a tornado - even in Tornado Alley - is so tiny that it usually isn't considered when it comes to construction. Instead, a lot of people are creating "safe rooms" in their homes. This is a small, windowless room with reinforced walls built to withstand winds & flying debris. The room can be used as a closet. Just make sure you keep it fairly clean so you can duck into it during those spring storms.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-07-2008, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Northglenn, Colorado
3,689 posts, read 6,537,258 times
Reputation: 908
have a basement installed. They are great protection for tornadoes. the synthetic brick looks horrible. Like others said, anything can happen with a twister. check that your local building department requires the use of hurricane ties for roof trusses, and if they have any special requirements as far as codes.

other than that, not much else you can do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2008, 08:30 AM
 
3,021 posts, read 7,215,160 times
Reputation: 1558
Be aware that a lot of the earth in Tornado Alley is not suitable for basements (lots of clay, low water table, etc.). That's one of the reasons why you don't see many basements in that area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2008, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,321 posts, read 18,891,088 times
Reputation: 4779
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsSteel View Post
Be aware that a lot of the earth in Tornado Alley is not suitable for basements (lots of clay, low water table, etc.). That's one of the reasons why you don't see many basements in that area.
Clay soils and a low water table are good criteria (as opposed to soils that heave with moisture and a high water table) for a basement. But, the main reason for the use of basements is because of the topo. The only reason you see basements up north- when the land is flat, is because of the frost level. They have to dig so far down to get past the frost level- it doesn't make any sense ( or cents) to fill it back up.

Last edited by K'ledgeBldr; 01-08-2008 at 10:06 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2008, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,321 posts, read 18,891,088 times
Reputation: 4779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noahma View Post
check that your local building department requires the use of hurricane ties for roof trusses.
I always get a laugh when I hear about the use of hurricane ties. Most counties and municipalities do require them today. The problem is- they're useless because the rest of the wall structure isn't tied together.
Top plates and bottom plates are end nailed, and the only thing tying them together is OSB- which is rarely nailed properly- usely not enough nails and sometimes too many nails. Both of which do nothing to tie the roof to the foundation of the house. Then theres the problem of tying together walls that are over 8' with 8' sheets of OSB-
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2008, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Northglenn, Colorado
3,689 posts, read 6,537,258 times
Reputation: 908
Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
I always get a laugh when I hear about the use of hurricane ties. Most counties and municipalities do require them today. The problem is- they're useless because the rest of the wall structure isn't tied together.
Top plates and bottom plates are end nailed, and the only thing tying them together is OSB- which is rarely nailed properly- usely not enough nails and sometimes too many nails. Both of which do nothing to tie the roof to the foundation of the house. Then theres the problem of tying together walls that are over 8' with 8' sheets of OSB-
I guess your right on this one, did not think about that. lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2008, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,249 posts, read 10,494,067 times
Reputation: 3587
I grew up in Kansas and I can tell you that the chances of your house being hit by a twister in 100 years are probably less than 1 in a million. Places in Kansas are FULL of 70+ year old houses that have not been blown away for a tornado.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top