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Old 09-12-2016, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,989 posts, read 36,253,688 times
Reputation: 63677

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Snout houses are for the developers benefit, but they do tend to result in a closed lifestyle. However I just hate houses that are basically garage with attached house. There are other options for tiny lots, however developers found snout houses convenient and profitable, so they told us we collectively love snout houses and the masses obeyed and started thinking they are acceptable.

Developers are even better at directing the thinking of the masses than they are at building homes.
I think you're reading a bit too much into this.

People demand affordable housing - and garages. Sometimes you have to take the good along with the bad. I don't think it's some vast developer conspiracy.
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Old 09-12-2016, 08:53 AM
 
4,315 posts, read 2,530,357 times
Reputation: 7686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Snout houses are for the developers benefit, but they do tend to result in a closed lifestyle. However I just hate houses that are basically garage with attached house. There are other options for tiny lots, however developers found snout houses convenient and profitable, so they told us we collectively love snout houses and the masses obeyed and started thinking they are acceptable.

Developers are even better at directing the thinking of the masses than they are at building homes.
It is me belief that the reason snout houses were built is to make the house appear to be much larger (sq ft ) than it really is.
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Old 09-12-2016, 08:55 AM
 
4,315 posts, read 2,530,357 times
Reputation: 7686
deal breaker ?..........."open yard"


I can see this on a newly built house but when the realtor lists that on a 20 year old house it means the owner was too lazy to plant any trees/shrubs that they might have to take care of or mow around.
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Old 09-12-2016, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,788 posts, read 10,205,449 times
Reputation: 14322
Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
I had to look up "snout house" - I'd never heard that before!

I learned that It's a house with the garage dominating the front view of the house, and I agree - I don't like what that says about the people inside (car dependent).
I don't care for front facing garages either but their presence says nothing about the owners. There are many front facing garages in walkable areas. Our suburb is car dependent and we have side facing garages.
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Old 09-12-2016, 10:32 PM
 
5,820 posts, read 5,191,568 times
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The objects we surround ourselves with do very much express who we are (semiotics); one of the main forms of human communication is through these chosen objects. But the perception of the objects is different based on who is doing the perceiving.

I don't think being car dependent is a "character flaw", I just think it's a depressing lifestyle.

My main deal breaker, as I said earlier, was a house on a busy road. I really dislike cars and everything to do with them. I fully understand this isn't a deal breaker for others.

One of those "you do you boo, I do me" things.
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Old 09-13-2016, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,989 posts, read 36,253,688 times
Reputation: 63677
Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
The objects we surround ourselves with do very much express who we are (semiotics); one of the main forms of human communication is through these chosen objects. But the perception of the objects is different based on who is doing the perceiving.

I don't think being car dependent is a "character flaw", I just think it's a depressing lifestyle.

My main deal breaker, as I said earlier, was a house on a busy road. I really dislike cars and everything to do with them. I fully understand this isn't a deal breaker for others.

One of those "you do you boo, I do me" things.
Wow, I love driving and I especially love a road trip! I stream my music and have a grand ol' time!

Now, to be clear, I don't personally care for front facing garages, though I did live in a house with one once and it was because overall the house fit my needs, in spite of the garage facing the front. I consider my vehicle to be a convenience that I'm grateful for. I COULD walk to the grocery store, if I wanted to drag my cart there and back about 3/4 of a mile (been there, done that - lived three years in Germany and walked everywhere - and then dragged those groceries up four flights of stairs too!). The walk would not be arduous - EXCEPT for during our very long, very hot summers. So yes, I'm grateful for my vehicle and the freedom it allows me.

We're about to take a vacation and drive up the coast of New England. I will enjoy the heck out of that. Of course, we'll stop and get out a lot.

Heck, when we took a vacation to England - where they drive "on the wrong side of the road" - we even rented a car. And had a fabulous time, even though turning left was scary as heck!
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Old 09-13-2016, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Pikesville, MD
2,983 posts, read 1,601,749 times
Reputation: 4552
Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post

I don't think being car dependent is a "character flaw", I just think it's a depressing lifestyle..


I'm a car guy and love cars, performance ones, custom ones, exotic ones, etc. I've owned over 130 of them in the last 40 years. I'd live in a 10 car garage with a lean-to on it for sleeping. I'd definitely have a house designed around a good working garage/showroom. I don't find it depressing at all.

Since I have a family, when we went looking for a house I compromised on the garage part and got a 2 1/2 car garage with shop and a 5 car parking pad in front of it. There's a hot rod pickup and MGB in the garage being worked on right now, and my other custom cars sit outside. The 1932 house was on a lot that faced the street, and the choice of where to put the parking pad was pretty much baked in. But I don't mind my BMW and MINI being out in front of the garage with room for guests to park off the street.
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Old 09-13-2016, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Midwest transplant
2,013 posts, read 4,999,381 times
Reputation: 1570
Sidewalks.
Public sewer and water.
No corner lot.
Decent closet and storage space.
At least 2 full bathrooms.
Attached garage.
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Old 09-13-2016, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,368 posts, read 10,355,263 times
Reputation: 28565
a window in the shower. I'm not that much of an exhibitionist
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Old 09-13-2016, 05:14 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,734 posts, read 2,554,931 times
Reputation: 9196
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Good thing you don't live in Alaska. You'll find a lot of pickups in driveways in just about every neighborhood. I don't find anything wrong with that.
It makes perfect sense to have a pickup truck in Alaska, but if a neighborhood in the SF Bay Area were to have an abundance of trucks in driveways or parked on the street in front of homes regularly (instead of in a 3-car garage as a lightly-used third vehicle), the impression given would be that the residents were less likely to be well-educated professionals and more likely to be blue collar.

We are well-educated professionals who don't smoke, and we'd like our neighbors to be more like us, as we would prefer to live in a community where the odds are greater that we would want to socialize with our neighbors.

In 2011 a study was done which indicated individuals with a bachelor's degree or more had a smoking prevalence rate of 9.1 percent. I think that's a nationwide average, as obviously Californians smoke much less than average anyway and Kentuckians and West Virginians smoke much more than average.

Last edited by SFBayBoomer; 09-13-2016 at 05:27 PM..
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