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Old 09-14-2016, 05:52 AM
 
Location: Pikesville, MD
2,983 posts, read 1,577,531 times
Reputation: 4552

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Absolutely. I wouldn't live in a neighborhood WITHOUT an HOA. And I'm no snob - but I like the idea of my property value being well protected.

How'd that work in 2008 when everybody tanked?


I HATE HOAs with a passion. Busybodies that don't have enough control in their lives that they have to control how everyone else lives. It's the antithesis to the American philosophy.
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Old 09-14-2016, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,315 posts, read 35,852,560 times
Reputation: 62678
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiffer E38 View Post
How'd that work in 2008 when everybody tanked?


I HATE HOAs with a passion. Busybodies that don't have enough control in their lives that they have to control how everyone else lives. It's the antithesis to the American philosophy.
We sold, and bought, a home in 2009, both in HOAs, and came out fine - because the beauty of losing value (temporarily) in your home and buying one in the same area, which also lost some value, is that everything evens out!

By the way, surely I don't have to point out to you that HOAs are not there to cushion homeowners against massive market fluctuations, do I? In our neighborhoods, they're there to protect homeowners against other homeowners who would otherwise do things like running a puppy mill out of their garage, parking cars permanently on the street, building a dome home, putting a trailer up on blocks as a guest house, or building a cinder block fence around their property - that sort of thing.

You don't like HOAs, and that's fine - don't buy a home in an area with an HOA. But I appreciate the HOAs that I've been a part of (not ever on the board, just as a resident) and have had absolutely ZERO issues with them in the 30 years I've been a homeowner. Not one time has an HOA been intrusive or problematic to deal with.

Your freedom to choose and my freedom to choose the types of neighborhoods and properties we want are freedoms that are very much in line with the freedoms I enjoy as an American citizen. We both win!

By the way, just so you know, the HOA we're a part of does not "control how we live" in any way other than protecting the integrity of the neighborhood in the areas of building style and size, parking options, organizing semi annual neighborhood get togethers in the common areas, and keeping the common areas maintained and beautiful. I especially appreciate that last point because I live directly across the street from a common area - a park area with a pretty little creek running through it. It's a lot that is in a flood zone (not my lot, the park area) so no one can build on it, but it needs to be maintained and mowed, and the creek area needs occasional maintenance. That area is used by the entire neighborhood for various things, and it's beautiful and an asset to the community, but SOMEONE has to maintain it, and that's where the HOA comes in. The HOA collects the very small annual HOA dues ($100 per year) from residents, and coordinates care and maintenance of the common areas, and if someone wants to build in the neighborhood, they have to have the plans approved by the HOA (I've never heard of any plans being disapproved, by the way, but that may be because people in our neighborhood have good taste, who knows?), and that's about it.

To give you an example of how NON intrusive they are, we are currently having a big outdoor living area added, to the tune of about 800 square feet, with a pergola, a fire pit, a hot tub, and a water feature. None of this had to be approved by the HOA and in the two weeks of mayhem on our property - cement trucks, masons, electricians, etc. not one HOA board member has even stopped by to chat. So no, I don't feel like they're intrusive.
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Old 09-14-2016, 07:28 AM
 
1,432 posts, read 1,110,915 times
Reputation: 4792
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFBayBoomer View Post
It makes perfect sense to have a pickup truck in Alaska, but if a neighborhood in the SF Bay Area were to have an abundance of trucks in driveways or parked on the street in front of homes regularly (instead of in a 3-car garage as a lightly-used third vehicle), the impression given would be that the residents were less likely to be well-educated professionals and more likely to be blue collar.

We are well-educated professionals who don't smoke, and we'd like our neighbors to be more like us, as we would prefer to live in a community where the odds are greater that we would want to socialize with our neighbors.

In 2011 a study was done which indicated individuals with a bachelor's degree or more had a smoking prevalence rate of 9.1 percent. I think that's a nationwide average, as obviously Californians smoke much less than average anyway and Kentuckians and West Virginians smoke much more than average.
Many blue collar workers have a higher education. So you won't socialize with some one who works a blue collar job? You sound like a snob.
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Old 09-14-2016, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Finally the house is done and we are in Port St. Lucie!
3,488 posts, read 2,048,189 times
Reputation: 9734
I dislike labels.

Well educated people smoke also, they are just better at hiding the fact.

And we wonder why the total division of our country.



As to the topic of the thread:

I guess there really is no deal breaker, per se, since it depends on the area. For example: Living in Florida I would totally want a pool. Living in Pennsylvania, not such a needed requirement.

For me now living in Florida, no pool would be a deal breaker. Although that is a misnomer in itself since I wouldn't even look at a house without one or the space to have one installed. Hmmmm So that no longer becomes a deal breaker issue

Whatever \_(ツ)_/
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Old 09-14-2016, 02:14 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,660 posts, read 2,513,423 times
Reputation: 9091
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I used to be pretty uneducated about what constituted a "blue collar worker" myself. I sort of subconsciously thought that being blue collar meant a person didn't have much in the way of a formal education after high school.
I completely understand. As a matter of fact, one of my university degrees is in German Studies, which includes not only the language and literature, but also the laws, education, politics, economy, etc. of the country and it's neighbors. (I also lived there for a couple of years, including doing some minor post-graduate work in Germany.) As you may know, Germany is considered to be the epitome of highly trained and educated blue collar workers, in addition to excellence in typical "white collar" post-secondary education.

Rather than my going into the entire details of the German education system (good and bad) and my personal knowledge of the unique German educational system as it was and is, just Google "germany blue collar education". There is an article entitled "'Blue-collar aristocrats' thrive in German economy" that you might find interesting. It offers a snapshot of the apprenticeship model used there, too. It has changed somewhat since I first learned in great detail of the German school system, but it's a good start.

Last edited by SFBayBoomer; 09-14-2016 at 02:28 PM..
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Old 09-14-2016, 02:34 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,660 posts, read 2,513,423 times
Reputation: 9091
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccc123 View Post
Many blue collar workers have a higher education. So you won't socialize with some one who works a blue collar job? You sound like a snob.
See my comments below. I do socialize with so-called blue-collar professionals, but not all blue collar work is the same and some stereotypes fit.

I admire blue collar professionals who take pride in their work.

But whether you think I am a snob or not is of no consequence to me.
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Old 09-14-2016, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,315 posts, read 35,852,560 times
Reputation: 62678
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFBayBoomer View Post
I completely understand. As a matter of fact, one of my university degrees is in German Studies, which includes not only the language and literature, but also the laws, education, politics, economy, etc. of the country and it's neighbors. (I also lived there for a couple of years, including doing some minor post-graduate work in Germany.) As you may know, Germany is considered to be the epitome of highly trained and educated blue collar workers, in addition to excellence in typical "white collar" post-secondary education.

Rather than my going into the entire details of the German education system (good and bad) and my personal knowledge of the unique German educational system as it was and is, just Google "germany blue collar education". There is an article entitled "'Blue-collar aristocrats' thrive in German economy" that you might find interesting. It offers a snapshot of the apprenticeship model used there, too. It has changed somewhat since I first learned in great detail of the German school system, but it's a good start.
Thanks, but no need to Google it - I lived in Germany for several years, have many German friends, and have a great admiration for their educational system in general, and specifically for their emphasis on the trades. Though the article sounds interesting.


Where did you live in Germany? I lived in Aschaffenburg. Loved it.
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Old 09-14-2016, 08:58 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,660 posts, read 2,513,423 times
Reputation: 9091
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Where did you live in Germany? I lived in Aschaffenburg. Loved it.
I lived longest in NRW and secondarily B-W (Stuttgart suburb), but although I visited Bavaria numerous times, I only stayed there overnight a week or two at a time in Augsburg, Munich, and Bad Aibling.

I'm definitely fondest of the Rhineland (NRW and RP).

I'd like to suggest, though, that we get back on topic.

A deal breaker for me would be a ratty-looking, unkempt front yard.

Last edited by SFBayBoomer; 09-14-2016 at 09:11 PM..
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Old 09-15-2016, 06:41 PM
 
2,780 posts, read 997,883 times
Reputation: 3678
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiffer E38 View Post
How'd that work in 2008 when everybody tanked?


I HATE HOAs with a passion. Busybodies that don't have enough control in their lives that they have to control how everyone else lives. It's the antithesis to the American philosophy.
My last neighborhood had a HOA. I won't do that again. HOA's attract too many shallow and petty people focused on "protecting their investment". I had the most expensive house in the subdivision and my property was immaculately maintained so my dislike of HOAs has nothing to do with the manner that I keep my property. It was the people that HOAs attract.
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Old 09-15-2016, 06:52 PM
 
2,780 posts, read 997,883 times
Reputation: 3678
Deal breakers for me are anything less than a 2 car garage, there not being a basement, being on a main road, being adjacent to commercial development, evidence of mold or other water damage, evidence of termites or other bug damage, the home being in a high population community (say more than 5,000 people), the home being on a small lot (say under 10 acres), the home being too small (say under 2,500 sq. ft), or the home being at risk of floods. On that last point it never ceases to amaze me how many are surprised when their home floods. Its not that hard to know flooding is a possibility.
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