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View Poll Results: Do you live in an area that has light pollution?
Yes 41 51.25%
No 19 23.75%
Somewhat 20 25.00%
Voters: 80. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-02-2016, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
5,563 posts, read 3,104,648 times
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Light isn't pollution, IMHO, and the effect of light is grossly exaggerated in those maps. Smog and haze has far more effect than night lighting on our ability to see stars, during our stagnant air inversions. THAT is pollution.

I have a mercury vapor light that lights up our whole compound and barnyard...

... and yet I can still see lots of stars and the occasional satellite when it's clear enough.
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Old 10-02-2016, 06:49 PM
 
Location: D.C.
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I've got a street light out front that is blindingly bright and horrible color temperature. It might meet a pellet gun this winter...
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Old 10-02-2016, 07:03 PM
 
11,383 posts, read 7,776,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
Light isn't pollution, IMHO, and the effect of light is grossly exaggerated in those maps. Smog and haze has far more effect than night lighting on our ability to see stars, during our stagnant air inversions. THAT is pollution.

I have a mercury vapor light that lights up our whole compound and barnyard...

... and yet I can still see lots of stars and the occasional satellite when it's clear enough.
You have a compound so you are not in the city center. Light pollution is not just do to a few street lights, it's all the city and town lights combined and those of buildings too and apartment lights in highrises. A light that you turn on when there is not a lot of light pollution in your area is not going to block your view of stars.
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Old 10-02-2016, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
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I understand, but looking at the maps, particularly the second one, one would think most of Western WA and much of Eastern WA all polluted by light.

Exaggeration, when discovered, only diminishes the effectiveness of the argument. I've been in debates about this before, with people on c-d, and I'm just not seeing it as a big problem we need to solve. I love my nightlights...

And FWIW, when it is stormy and our power is out and it truly is dark here, I get a lot of comfort and perspective from the glow I see from town. We are not alone.
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Old 10-02-2016, 07:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
I understand, but looking at the maps, particularly the second one, one would think most of Western WA and much of Eastern WA all polluted by light.

Exaggeration, when discovered, only diminishes the effectiveness of the argument. I've been in debates about this before, with people on c-d, and I'm just not seeing it as a big problem we need to solve. I love my nightlights...

And FWIW, when it is stormy and our power is out and it truly is dark here, I get a lot of comfort and perspective from the glow I see from town. We are not alone.
I don't see it as a problem, If you live in densely populated areas it's just a fact of life and you have to travel to see the wonders of the universe with the naked eye.
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Old 10-02-2016, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
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Agreed.
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Old 10-02-2016, 07:40 PM
 
1,105 posts, read 590,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
I used to live in the northeast and you were barely able to see any stars even on clear nights.

One night I did go to a party about 20 miles from where I lived and I was amazed at how many stars I could see.

I still have not been in an area where there is little or no light pollution where you can see thousands of stars.
I too grew up in the northeast, and still live there (outside of Annapolis), but I have traveled somewhat extensively in my meager 30 years and on a low budget.

Go to Wyoming, go to rural Arizona, western South Dakota...you will see. The desert in Kuwait and northward is wide open and rarely ever has even a wisp of clouds and you can see ALL the stars that are visible to the human eye on that particular day at that particular latitude (season matters and so does latitude, you should check out a "sky atlas").

I have been to western Canada too, but unfortunately my visit was obscured by smoke from fires burning in Washington, Oregon and Idaho, during my visit to Canada's east coast I don't think I ever got a perfectly clear night, but some stars could be made out.
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Old 10-02-2016, 07:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Brian_M View Post
Everything on the East Coast of the US suffers from light pollution. This photo is from here:



Nothing fancy, a $400 Sony Nex5 camera and a cheap tripod, it was my first ever attempt and thus sucks when compared to what Experienced folks are doing, but you get the point. My folks built their retirement home just up the road about 10 miles on property they've owned since ~1994 or so. Everytime I take someone new there and get them outside on a new moon (or before it rises), they're blown away by the number of stars that can be seen.

Here in Very rural Georgia, I couldn't catch 1/10th the number of stars.
Will a 13 mp cell phone camera capture all the stars?
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Old 10-02-2016, 07:44 PM
 
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I remember hearing an interesting fact that some of the stars we see are no longer there, their light takes so long to get to us that they have already died out.
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Old 10-03-2016, 07:07 AM
 
4,448 posts, read 7,192,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
Will a 13 mp cell phone camera capture all the stars?

It's not the megapixels of the camera, it's the technique. You need 4 things, 3 of them aren't an issue (tripod and delayed shutter release for steadiness, and then a long shutter release), the 4th is something with a low aperture, and I don't think you can do anything about that with a phone ~ you either have it or you don't.

It's been several years since I tried doing night photos, you might want to try searching the web for advice and hints.
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