U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-08-2016, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,619 posts, read 12,930,821 times
Reputation: 10698

Advertisements

The Habitats for Humanities here has always had carpet squares, roughly 16"x 16". some bigger, some smaller, that I buy and put on my work bench. It keeps stuff from sliding around and the carpet takes the beating, not the workbench which in my case is a 3070 1 3/4" solid core oak door on steel legs. The squares cost me 50 cents. When they get messed up, they take a ride to the dump. I buy probably 20 at a time. The wife uses them on rainy days at the doors.. I power wash them later. Lots of uses for these things. Good indoor/outdoor commercial grade carpet with the rubber mat back. If you have a HfH in your area, check it out. They have lots of really neat stuff, and they have some junk too. A lot of the building centers when they are clearing out inventory give it to HfH so you can find quality name brand paints for cheap as well as screws, nails, electrical, just about everything you'd find in a Lowes or HD. I even bought some 12x 12 porcelain high definition tile there for 79 cents a tile. Now that was the deal of the year. But buy what you need cause they may never have it again.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-08-2016, 08:12 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,483 posts, read 17,641,870 times
Reputation: 30691
Boiled Linseed Oil.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2016, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,004 posts, read 22,741,002 times
Reputation: 34905
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrapperL View Post
The Habitats for Humanities here has always had carpet squares, roughly 16"x 16". some bigger, some smaller, that I buy and put on my work bench. It keeps stuff from sliding around and the carpet takes the beating, not the workbench which in my case is a 3070 1 3/4" solid core oak door on steel legs. The squares cost me 50 cents. When they get messed up, they take a ride to the dump. I buy probably 20 at a time. The wife uses them on rainy days at the doors.. I power wash them later. Lots of uses for these things. Good indoor/outdoor commercial grade carpet with the rubber mat back. If you have a HfH in your area, check it out. They have lots of really neat stuff, and they have some junk too. A lot of the building centers when they are clearing out inventory give it to HfH so you can find quality name brand paints for cheap as well as screws, nails, electrical, just about everything you'd find in a Lowes or HD. I even bought some 12x 12 porcelain high definition tile there for 79 cents a tile. Now that was the deal of the year. But buy what you need cause they may never have it again.
What a great idea. Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2016, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,004 posts, read 22,741,002 times
Reputation: 34905
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
One thing you want to avoid with work bench especially if you are using it for wood working is paint. It tends to mess up wood if you slide it around or clamp stuff to the bench. Since you already have it on there you can always hit it with some poly.
Hmmm. Good point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2016, 07:42 AM
 
5,116 posts, read 4,606,978 times
Reputation: 4375
Just some thoughts on work bench surfaces.

Norm Abramson of New Yankee Workshop / This Old House fame built a work bench as one of his projects on NYW. He used pine boards to create a quarter inch raised edge around the perimeter, then cut a large piece of hard board to fit the top of the bench. The rationale was that the hard board was smooth, could take some abuse, and if it ever got too stained or damaged, one could simply discard the old hard board and replace with a new hard board.

The company that I work for has mechanical work shops. The benches themselves are metal with a slightly raised edge all around, but the top surfaces always have replaceable ribbed rubber mats. The rubber keeps work pieces from sliding around, the ridges keep round objects from rolling around, and the surface can be easily replaced if needed.

From the OP's situation, he's just got a piece of plywood on top of a dresser in his apartment. Unless he's really ambitious, I don't think that he doing anything too intense there. For a cheap option, I'd just seal the board with a couple of coats of paint and replace the plywood board when it gets damaged or stained. For a more expensive option, I might opt for a ribbed rubber mat on top of the plywood.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2016, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Knoxville
4,232 posts, read 20,685,114 times
Reputation: 4964
I guess it depends on if the workbench is for show, or you are actually going to work on it.
The Masonite, or hardboard approach is what I use on some of my benches. Replace it when it gets too messed up.
My cutting table bench has 3/4 MDF and I replace it when there are too many saw kerfs.
My hardwood work bench (more of a show piece if you will (but still is used for work) - made with solid oak lumber 30 years ago) has an oil finish that I redo every once in a while. If I spill glue on it, the oiled surface makes it easy to chip off.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2016, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,004 posts, read 22,741,002 times
Reputation: 34905
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
Just some thoughts on work bench surfaces.

Norm Abramson of New Yankee Workshop / This Old House fame built a work bench as one of his projects on NYW. He used pine boards to create a quarter inch raised edge around the perimeter, then cut a large piece of hard board to fit the top of the bench. The rationale was that the hard board was smooth, could take some abuse, and if it ever got too stained or damaged, one could simply discard the old hard board and replace with a new hard board.

The company that I work for has mechanical work shops. The benches themselves are metal with a slightly raised edge all around, but the top surfaces always have replaceable ribbed rubber mats. The rubber keeps work pieces from sliding around, the ridges keep round objects from rolling around, and the surface can be easily replaced if needed.

From the OP's situation, he's just got a piece of plywood on top of a dresser in his apartment. Unless he's really ambitious, I don't think that he doing anything too intense there. For a cheap option, I'd just seal the board with a couple of coats of paint and replace the plywood board when it gets damaged or stained. For a more expensive option, I might opt for a ribbed rubber mat on top of the plywood.
This is brilliant! What I ended up doing, was putting a couple coats of Rustoleum 2X clear coat spray on it, which I already had. It had a matte finish. This was put on top of a coat of paint and primer in one paint that I had on hand, which I put on the board after my failed attempt to "distress" the plywood with the vinegar/coffee/stainless steel solution.

It's so far working out well. When I have to drill something, I have a couple of 3/4 inch boards on hand that I had, that are about 12"x14" or so. And when I have painted something, I just put down some brown paper that I can get at the dollar store.

I've moved boards and metal around on it, without the boards, and it's getting somewhat scratched up, but not as bad as I expected.

And yes, it's just attached with an L-bracket to the back plywood piece, so I can just easily remove it and replace it when necessary. And I can repaint it in the meantime when I have to.

All I do on it is mainly use my drill press, drill into things with my other hand drill (corded), and paint things.

It's been so wonderful having a workbench, though! Here I am at 60 years old learning the wonders of having a workbench LOL. It's so great to have all of my tools right where they are supposed to be, within reach. My main challenge now is having somewhere to put things I'm working on in my tiny apartment. I don't have the luxury of having several projects "in the works." But, the upside to that, is I'm actually finishing projects LOL. It makes me finish something before I start something else.

I really appreciate everyone's feedback. It's so nice to have somewhere to go to get great advice from pros - for free! It's the best thing about CD. Thanks!

I took a photo of the finished, painted workbench. I'll try and get it uploaded tomorrow.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2016, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,004 posts, read 22,741,002 times
Reputation: 34905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barking Spider View Post
I guess it depends on if the workbench is for show, or you are actually going to work on it.
The Masonite, or hardboard approach is what I use on some of my benches. Replace it when it gets too messed up.
My cutting table bench has 3/4 MDF and I replace it when there are too many saw kerfs.
My hardwood work bench (more of a show piece if you will (but still is used for work) - made with solid oak lumber 30 years ago) has an oil finish that I redo every once in a while. If I spill glue on it, the oiled surface makes it easy to chip off.
Thanks. Yes, it's a trade-off with it being in the middle of my tiny apartment. I do want it to look decent, too, if possible. Not perfect, but just not super ugly.

The oiled surface sounds like it works well. I had some furniture wax on hand - the kind you heat up and apply and then buff. I think that would have worked well, but I was too lazy to buff and decided to go with the clear coat instead, simply out of laziness :-) But, I like the idea of the oil over the wax. I just wonder about wax leaving a residue, too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2016, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,004 posts, read 22,741,002 times
Reputation: 34905
Okay, here's the final product:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/membe...-finished.html

This morning I put a clear coat on this painted board. I just placed it on a board that I wrapped in brown paper.

Thanks for all of your help and advice!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top