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Old 10-16-2016, 06:44 AM
 
11,210 posts, read 8,350,431 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
They are not tornado magnets, there is nothing in the aluminum or ground etc, It's just a fact that the many do not withstand tornado winds so when on passes they get destroyed.
Just an affectionate term. I think it has a lot to do with the fact mobile home parks are on very large, flat expanses of land and tornadoes kind of travel along that type of terrain.
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Old 10-16-2016, 06:47 AM
 
11,210 posts, read 8,350,431 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
The ones damaged from hurricanes are the old aluminum sided ones from the 60s-70s, the newer models with vinyl siding (plywood underneath) and shingled roofs hold up just as well as a house. When hurricane Ivan (cat 3) made a direct hit here very few newer mobile homes were damaged other than some missing shingles and skirting.
If I could say no in more than one language I'd post them all here.
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Old 10-16-2016, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Southern Oregon coast
474 posts, read 501,506 times
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If you're retired and living on a fixed income without 3 million in the bank, a paid for manufactured home in a well maintained over 55 park in a desirable part of the US, is a pretty good deal. I love our house and our community. When the last used home went up for sale, there was a bidding war and it sold for more than asking. And they were asking 150,000.

You can't lump all manufactured home parks together. There are huge variations and in parts of the country that rarely get hurricanes or tornados and have high real estate costs, they are a great alternative.
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Old 10-16-2016, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Gettysburg, PA
1,611 posts, read 1,610,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
I doubt that anyone who can afford a McMansion would live in a mobile home
I can afford one of those things, but I much rather prefer the mobile home I live in (the McMansions I'm thinking of are the large newly built homes that don't have much land and normally have immature trees for it's landscape). We plan on this being a starter home for us and eventually moving to a larger home with more land or buying land and putting the home we have on it (and expanding it).

The park we live in is very nice, the people are mostly retirees or young professionals (like me) who are looking to save money on cost of living. The grounds are quiet and you don't see the stereotypical stuff that comes to mind when you think of a mobile home park like loud music, domestic fights, drug abuse (at least, that's what comes to my mind when I think of a mobile home park).

Our lot backs up to farmland with a strand of trees (separating the park from the farmer's field) and that gives us a little extra privacy. The lot rent is expensive, but my impression is that it keeps away the not so great clientele (and the application fee may do that as well seeing that it is $100). I'd personally rather pay high lot rent and not have to deal with annoying neighbors (which we thankfully don't have at the moment! The ones around us are very pleasant!)
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Old 10-16-2016, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Sector 001
7,233 posts, read 6,424,901 times
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Manufactured housing will NOT appreciate in value.. the land it's on might and at best it will hold it's value while the land it's on appreciates, which is why I would not live in a park. It might seem smart on the short term but in the long term you cost yourself money.. this is a generalization and might not be true in all markets though.

Also dragging one onto a plot of land that you purchase can be quite economical compared to building a stick built from scratch. Just beware of their limitations and benefits and do your DD.
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Old 10-16-2016, 08:22 PM
 
9,375 posts, read 6,993,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
If it an old 8 foot wide trailer they might be easier to move.

If you are thinking RV that's different.


No one is moving a 12 foot wide mobile home around, you would need a permit because they are too wide for the road.
How do you think they get where they are to start with? Helicopters?

Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Heres what I have noticed happening...

Owner puts their mobile home in a park, they live there maybe a decade and decide they want to move, then have trouble selling. They end up selling to the park owner for cheap, then the park owner turns it into a rental. That's when things go downhill fast.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamies View Post
MY opinion of trailer parks? Most ought to be bulldozed and the inhabitants put into jail or rehab. Exceptions being senior retirement parks and up-scale RV parks. Our town has bulldozed two in recent years and about ten to go. Drug infested dens of crime and debauchery. Well you wanted my opinion.

Both decently accurate in general terms. Having your own mobile home on your own property.. Not a bad deal. Or.. You could do what I did.. Purchase out of foreclosure at auction.

3.5 acres plus a 3 year old doublewide mobile home for $37k. Septic already installed, well already dug. I paid a couple grand to have a foundation built (Brick underpenning) and converted it to real property. Taxes run me about $350 a year.

I would have had it for $25k if some bastard hadn't kept bidding against me and jacking up the price at the auction.

You look at that.. I pretty much paid for the property, septic and well and the home was thrown in free.

The only problems I've had.. Light switches and water faucets are crap. Just junk. I've replaced almost all of them. The appliances WOULD be junk, but the foreclosed-upon people took those with them. Hot water heater failed and I wound up with about $1k in flooring replacement, but that's not really any different if I had been in a stick built (and shame on me for never getting around to installing a drain pan under it). Had a well pressure tank fail and some water feed plumbing issues, but all outside, not inside, so, those weren't really mobile home related either.

I've had to rebuild the back deck, but again, even pressure treated wood after 10 years in the elements, and that has nothing to do with it being a mobile, that's just crappy builders. Getting parts is a pain.. I have a couple places where I need to replace drywall and it's 5/8" vinyl coated drywall. PITA to get. Doors are oddball sizes, even the front door. There is little shopping at Home Depot for parts. Mobile home supply store is where you basically get everything. I need to replace the carpet.. it's wearing out, but.. I haven't decided what i'm going to do there. But.. 13 years on the carpet. Not bad. Especially with little-Miss-Muddypaws behind me tracking dirt in.


My power bill runs about $175 in the summer (Carolina heat) and that's me being pretty conservative with power. A/C at 85 during the day while I'm at work, down to 82 once I get home, and 78 when I go to bed, which is comfortable for me.. Winter.. I heat with a kerosene heater, so.. Power bill is about $50 in winter, but I'm spending $40-60 a month in kero. I have flat out electric heat, one month where it was 10 degrees for a week straight, my power bill was $300, so, that was the end of the heat running.. When the system dies (I've been here 10 years now, it's still original).. I'll likely replace with a heat pump. But.. Then again.. 10 years and I've fixed the A/C every time there's been a problem. Which has been 3 friggin' contactors because fire-ants keep getting in them. Gotta get me one of those solid-state deals for next summer. Oh, and the field mouse across the capacitor.. That's what you get living in the country.

I have a pitched, shingled roof. No issues with it.. Knock on wood.. Though I do figure within the next 5 years or so, that's probably going to need repaired and replaced.

Mobile homes FREQUENTLY get 'repossessed" or "Foreclosed".. Whichever your state calls it. It's a gamble buying one at an auction, but.. If you do a little legwork.. You can get a hell of a deal.
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Old 10-17-2016, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
26,424 posts, read 62,653,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nothere1 View Post
Y
I disagree with this. Out of every natural disaster, I think you would be safer in a mobile home/ trailer than a house or an apartment. These things are very flexible, as they need to be for travel. These buildings also have a more flexible foundation than a normal building. Also, they are usually single story and their materials are light. So if it did come down, I think your chances of survival would be much higher.

Not quite. They are built to be light and cheap. They are both flexible and flimsy. No, their foundations are not more flexible, they are generally on concrete block, usually unreenforced.

You might be a bit safer in an earthquake, certainly more so than in a masonry building. However, the greater danger in an earthquake is fire. Trailers go up in a flash. Residents are lucky if they escape in a fire. One of the things sacrificed in making them lighter and cheaper is fire protection. If you live in one, have a ton of smoke an heat detectors. Also make sure you know how to get out through a window in every room.

Light and cheap means they do not resist winds well. They are not only subject to wind damage, but debris goes right through the walls without slowing (however this is also true of most newer SFR homes). They are readily floated off their foundation in a flood.

One of the ones my daughter lived in had a metal awning over the patio. Semi-High winds carried the awning away, but the awning was bolted to the top of the trailer, so, when the awning became a kite, it peeled the roof away like ripping open a soda can. This was windy, but not something unusual.

Also the congested layout of a typical park means it will be difficult to get out in an evacuation. For that reason it is good to have an alternate plan to get out (usually that means driving over a barrier or through a field). Or you can choose a lot near the entrance/exit to the park. The down side of that is it can increase the likelihood of burglary. (The bad guys do not like driving around the curvy congested TP streets after stealing things, so they focus on trailers near the entrance). OTOH, many new subdivisions also have congested twisty streets and only one or two entrance,egress streets, they sort of copied trailer parks in this way, while it improves privacy and to some extent security for the people further in, I would not want to try to get out of one in an emergency.

It is very difficult to make them secure. Again this is true of most newer homes. Trailers are flimsy and easily broken, so they are easy to break into. Newer homes can be made secure at the door, but it is very easy to go right through a wall. (In any home, windows are another easy way in). However people tend to focus on doors and trailer door frames are not sturdy. Trailer parks also tend to make attractive targets because thieves can burgle several of them very quickly.

So no, while trailers may have other advantages, they are not safer in a natural disaster, nor in a fire, nor in a crime situation. In fact, the are the opposite of safer.

Last edited by Coldjensens; 10-17-2016 at 06:38 AM..
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Old 10-17-2016, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Floribama
14,746 posts, read 31,175,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Not quite. They are built to be light and cheap. They are both flexible and flimsy. No, their foundations are not more flexible, they are generally on concrete block, usually unreenforced.

You might be a bit safer in an earthquake, certainly more so than in a masonry building. However, the greater danger in an earthquake is fire. Trailers go up in a flash. Residents are lucky if they escape in a fire. One of the things sacrificed in making them lighter and cheaper is fire protection. If you live in one, have a ton of smoke an heat detectors. Also make sure you know how to get out through a window in every room.

Light and cheap means they do not resist winds well. They are not only subject to wind damage, but debris goes right through the walls without slowing (however this is also true of most newer SFR homes). They are readily floated off their foundation in a flood.

One of the ones my daughter lived in had a metal awning over the patio. Semi-High winds carried the awning away, but the awning was bolted to the top of the trailer, so, when the awning became a kite, it peeled the roof away like ripping open a soda can. This was windy, but not something unusual.

Also the congested layout of a typical park means it will be difficult to get out in an evacuation. For that reason it is good to have an alternate plan to get out (usually that means driving over a barrier or through a field). Or you can choose a lot near the entrance/exit to the park. The down side of that is it can increase the likelihood of burglary. (The bad guys do not like driving around the curvy congested TP streets after stealing things, so they focus on trailers near the entrance). OTOH, many new subdivisions also have congested twisty streets and only one or two entrance,egress streets, they sort of copied trailer parks in this way, while it improves privacy and to some extent security for the people further in, I would not want to try to get out of one in an emergency.

It is very difficult to make them secure. Again this is true of most newer homes. Trailers are flimsy and easily broken, so they are easy to break into. Newer homes can be made secure at the door, but it is very easy to go right through a wall. (In any home, windows are another easy way in). However people tend to focus on doors and trailer door frames are not sturdy. Trailer parks also tend to make attractive targets because thieves can burgle several of them very quickly.

So no, while trailers may have other advantages, they are not safer in a natural disaster, nor in a fire, nor in a crime situation. In fact, the are the opposite of safer.
Like I said, all of these things may be true for older ones, but every mobile home down this way built since 1994 has 2x4 framing with 1/2" plywood sheathing under the vinyl siding, no different than many newer houses. If you get down into the wind zone 3 area in south Florida they actually have 2x6 framing in the outer walls.
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Old 10-17-2016, 09:54 AM
 
Location: not normal, IL
776 posts, read 390,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterseat View Post
Just an affectionate term. I think it has a lot to do with the fact mobile home parks are on very large, flat expanses of land and tornadoes kind of travel along that type of terrain.
I like your thought but being in the Midwest and have lived in many I have another theory. Contrary to what many believe, the Midwest isn't 100% flat. I have found that tornados somehow follow small valleys, scientifically I don't know if this is correct, I'm just stating my observation. Usually, being lower income neighborhoods, they are built on lower ground, making it more likely for them to get hit. But you are correct, many of them are on flatter, open field like places.
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Old 10-17-2016, 11:36 AM
 
Location: not normal, IL
776 posts, read 390,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Not quite. They are built to be light and cheap. They are both flexible and flimsy. No, their foundations are not more flexible, they are generally on concrete block, usually unreenforced. .
They are legally to be tied to the ground. They are not to be directly on the concrete block, please help your daughter put 2x6's between the concrete and frame. This helps absorb movement and prevents damage to the blocks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
You might be a bit safer in an earthquake, certainly more so than in a masonry building. However, the greater danger in an earthquake is fire. Trailers go up in a flash. Residents are lucky if they escape in a fire. One of the things sacrificed in making them lighter and cheaper is fire protection .
I've seen many buildings go up. The reason for trailers going up quickly is the design, not the material. They are long and narrow with space underneath for air movement. If you have ever used a forge, you would see the concept in place. I really doubt manufactures would make a product intentionally flammable, these are made out of the same things normal houses are. With newer, safer materials, I think they are much safer than years past.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
They are readily floated off their foundation in a flood.
I totally agree with the wind statements. As for water, you are very mistaken. They are to be cabled to the ground, I thought this was law in all 50. The greatest thing I like about a trailer is that you don't have to worry about foundation and a flooding basement like a house. To be fare this may vary by region.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
It is very difficult to make them secure. Again this is true of most newer homes. Trailers are flimsy and easily broken, so they are easy to break into. Newer homes can be made secure at the door, but it is very easy to go right through a wall. (In any home, windows are another easy way in). However people tend to focus on doors and trailer door frames are not sturdy. Trailer parks also tend to make attractive targets because thieves can burgle several of them very quickly.
......If a thieve wants in, they will get in. I find that every time there was a burglary in my trailer park, it was someone else in the trailer park. This was easy to find out as many were unemployed and there were many people outside at all times to witness these events. I find thieves usually hit higher income residents, as they have more expensive items and often have day jobs. More over the higher wealth suburbs.
......I had mine broken into three times in four years. I got mine right out of college so I didn't have a lot of money. First time, they stole the beer out of my frig. Second time, nothing, that was depressing, a real kick to the self esteem. Third time was some movies and a crappy laptop.
......As I previously stated, I think the smaller ones are good.
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