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Old 10-15-2016, 09:25 AM
 
11,383 posts, read 7,802,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterseat View Post
In this expensive state, CT, there are only a few parks left and most have been bought up by one company. We lived in one for a while. My guy purchased one for low teens, gradually restored it, paid $400/mo to live there while doing so, sold it for $30. It was a winning situation for him/us.

When you consider the "tiny house" crazy, even a single wide park model is VERY spacious. The rules of the park have a lot to do with the quality of living. Some allow anything, some are stricter.

You've heard the term "tornado magnet"? There's a reason for that. Be prepared to evacuate.
Thirty Dollars?
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Old 10-15-2016, 09:27 AM
 
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They are not tornado magnets, there is nothing in the aluminum or ground etc, It's just a fact that the many do not withstand tornado winds so when on passes they get destroyed.
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Old 10-15-2016, 10:02 AM
 
Location: not normal, IL
776 posts, read 394,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyFarm34 View Post
Have you or known anyone who lived in one?
10+ years; have many family members and friends in them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyFarm34 View Post
Windows are typically small so not much natural light shines in.
I have installed many windows, use tall and narrow windows or the weight of the roof will cause wide windows to jam.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyFarm34 View Post
Some do look nice from the outside..
These are build like a house. For many years mobile homes were built with liberal building methods, this is why they have such a bad reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyFarm34 View Post
I noticed most people keep their windows covered with either curtains or blinds...
Two reasons, to keep your neighbors from seeing which items they want to steal. Second, with a metal roof and metal siding, and usually poor insulation, you need to keep as much heat out as possible. It is like a tin can in the sun in the summer time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyFarm34 View Post
They don't seem too bad living in one if living simply, not accumulating many things since space is small.
Yes, this is why they are a favorite alternative to other small home ideas.

The main issue with trailers
http://hiimobilehome.com/wp-content/...5766373743.jpg
Notice how the weight of the walls, and therefore the roof too, is not on the block supported rails. They are on the side triangle supports. This is why they are often made too light. I know people that put blocks under triangle pieces, all the way around the base. If you do this, it is no longer taxed as a MH and you now get taxed as a manufactured house, $$ to $$$$. Also, the triangle pieces still aren't that supportive, I don't think they were designed to have a foundation under them.

All in all, if they are made right, they can be great. Financially, I would only get a small one.
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Old 10-15-2016, 10:21 AM
 
Location: not normal, IL
776 posts, read 394,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyFarm34 View Post
Have you or known anyone who lived in one? .
You also asked of mobile home parks. It's just like any other neighborhood. The more expensive the lot rent the less you have to worry about crime. You have your demographics just like any other neighborhood to. This is where I really became a regionalist (racist with states, nations, and regions), as I believe with the cheaper rent, you get many travelers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
Another concern with mobile homes is that we live in a hurricane prone area of the country. Even a category 1 might have mandatory evacuations at a MH park, where as you can easily ride it out in a stick built home.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
God must hate them, because he always seems to aim tornadoes at them...
Hurricanes: Water, water, and more water in every direction. Yes you would need one of the newer, well built ones for this.
Tornados: I don't really think to many get hit by actual tornados, or nothing would be their to film. If you think about it, they are long and narrow with no base weight. This makes it easier for them to be blown over by strong and straight line winds.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschrief View Post
My brother in law and his wife live in a "55" and over park in WA state. They seems to like it. They paid cash for the home, like 12k, and they pay "lot rent" of about $600 a month.
Not a good deal to me.
I'm sorry but this argument is invalid. Rent is high in WA. They have no Income tax so property and sales are elevated. I found MHP rent in WA for $300, although I wouldn't want to live there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
Earthquakes, I bet the older ones will crumble and fall apart. where a stick built home would survive better.
I disagree with this. Out of every natural disaster, I think you would be safer in a mobile home/ trailer than a house or an apartment. These things are very flexible, as they need to be for travel. These buildings also have a more flexible foundation than a normal building. Also, they are usually single story and their materials are light. So if it did come down, I think your chances of survival would be much higher.
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Old 10-15-2016, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Floribama
15,029 posts, read 31,400,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
They are not tornado magnets, there is nothing in the aluminum or ground etc, It's just a fact that the many do not withstand tornado winds so when on passes they get destroyed.
And the fact that 'tornado alley' has a lot of mobile homes. A stick built home won't survive a direct hit either.
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Old 10-15-2016, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,406 posts, read 7,929,570 times
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I could never live in one, especially in hurricane and tornado zones. I'd be a nervous wreck every every time the sky turned dark.
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Old 10-15-2016, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Floribama
15,029 posts, read 31,400,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
I could never live in one, especially in hurricane and tornado zones. I'd be a nervous wreck every every time the sky turned dark.
The ones damaged from hurricanes are the old aluminum sided ones from the 60s-70s, the newer models with vinyl siding (plywood underneath) and shingled roofs hold up just as well as a house. When hurricane Ivan (cat 3) made a direct hit here very few newer mobile homes were damaged other than some missing shingles and skirting.
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Old 10-15-2016, 01:09 PM
 
11,383 posts, read 7,802,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nothere1 View Post
, I think you would be safer in a mobile home/ trailer than a house or an apartment. These things are very flexible, as they need to be for travel.
Mobile homes are not built for travel, they are delivered and set up in one stop and usually stay there for decades. Try to move one that's been in the same spot for 40 years and you will be lucky that they don't fall apart during the trip to the next lot. They may be more flexible than a stick built home, that might help in an earthquake, I don't know, or they could snap and fall apart.
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Old 10-15-2016, 01:53 PM
 
Location: not normal, IL
776 posts, read 394,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
Mobile homes are not built for travel, they are delivered and set up in one stop and usually stay there for decades. Try to move one that's been in the same spot for 40 years and you will be lucky that they don't fall apart during the trip to the next lot. They may be more flexible than a stick built home, that might help in an earthquake, I don't know, or they could snap and fall apart.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_home
If you have worked on and/or owned the older ones, I say before 75', you would see they were made for travel. Many of them had permanent trailer lights. I'd say they got away from this in the late seventies, early eighties. But overall, they had the framing of a camper.
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/i...DcSxnU3w0vL-vw
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/i...z5CNMVbxky4G5w
I have seen people move these very successfully. If done correctly, it isn't a problem if there isn't water damage.
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Old 10-15-2016, 02:22 PM
 
11,383 posts, read 7,802,569 times
Reputation: 12274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nothere1 View Post
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_home
If you have worked on and/or owned the older ones, I say before 75', you would see they were made for travel. Many of them had permanent trailer lights. I'd say they got away from this in the late seventies, early eighties. But overall, they had the framing of a camper.
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/i...DcSxnU3w0vL-vw
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/i...z5CNMVbxky4G5w
I have seen people move these very successfully. If done correctly, it isn't a problem if there isn't water damage.
If it an old 8 foot wide trailer they might be easier to move.

If you are thinking RV that's different.


No one is moving a 12 foot wide mobile home around, you would need a permit because they are too wide for the road.
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