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Old 10-13-2016, 10:14 AM
 
70,789 posts, read 71,170,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
I use incandescents for some fixtures on dimmers. I use the low setting frequently.


I live in a hot area, so I don't like the heat put out by incandescents. It's a double whammy. Not just the higher cost of electricity, but it warms up the room, so the a/c has to work harder, which also adds to the a/c use.

.
led's give off a fair amount of heat . they depend on heat sinks to radiate the heat away from the front of the lamp. many led's cannot be used in enclosed fixtures because of the heat . the smaller wattage's being smaller lamps with less surface area run the hottest . a 7w led can see 135 degrees.

while it is less heat than incandescent's there is still heat issues to deal with .

cnet did some temperature testing

Online retailer EnergyCircle actually measured the difference and found that a halogen bulb, a type of incandescent bulb, ran at 327 degrees! A Cree LED downlight was measured at 107 degrees and a Philips Par38 CFL worked at 167 degrees.

but as i said the smaller the wattage the hotter they get .

That's not to say that heat isn't at all an issue. LED bulbs do get hot but the heat is dissipated by metal heat sinks that wick away the heat from the light source itself. Keeping them cool with heat sinks or even liquid cooling, as Switch Lighting is doing, is important to ensuring they last as long as advertised
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Old 10-13-2016, 10:19 AM
 
2,034 posts, read 2,418,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
led's give off a lot of heat . they depend on heat sinks to radiate the heat away from the front of the lamp. many led's cannot be used in enclosed fixtures because of the heat . the smaller wattage's being smaller lamps with less surface area run the hottest . a 7w led can see 135 degrees f
You have to buy the LEDs specifically rated to be used in enclosed fixtures. I have 2 60s in an enclosed fixture and so far so good.
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Old 10-13-2016, 10:20 AM
 
26,579 posts, read 52,038,772 times
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One comment on vanity lighting.

One of my neighbors heard my praise for LED and bought 6 for her bathroom vanity... she is not happy with them.

The six 60 Watt bulbs she had in there kept the top of the mirror from fogging and warmed the bathroom... her complaint is the LED don't warm up the area or keep the mirror fog free.

Sometimes I can't win... at least she still has options.
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Old 10-13-2016, 10:23 AM
 
70,789 posts, read 71,170,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebbe View Post
You have to buy the LEDs specifically rated to be used in enclosed fixtures. I have 2 60s in an enclosed fixture and so far so good.
they do make them for enclosed fixtures but most folks are unaware of that fact. they figure led's run cool and can go anywhere . but that is not the case. they generate quite a bit of heat so they need extra heat sinking for enclosed fixtures
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Old 10-13-2016, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Southwest
673 posts, read 597,103 times
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LED lights rock.

LED bulbs are much better than fluorescent. They are now sold in a variety of color tones from daylight white to warmer. They are now made in a variety of attractive indoor use styles. There are LED bulbs for all light fixtures and lamps now, including moisture resistant fixtures for near and in showers.

LED bulbs are no longer expensive. Even if you pay more per bulb initially than you would for an incandescent or a fluorescent, they last for so many years, the price ends up cheaper in the long run. Because they last for years (decades) they are great for high ceilings and other too high to reach easily spots and for outdoor lights. They use a fraction of the energy the old bulbs use, so using them is better for our wallets and makes us better citizens because we are helping the nation conserve energy. (Conserving and how we use our energy is important to national defense and the longterm health of the environment by the way. Energy independence is important to national defense, and using less energy contributes to our nation's ability to be energy independent.)

In our last home, we replaced all of the canned lights throughout the house with much more attractive retrofit recessed LED fixtures with built-in to the fixture bulbs and added small recessed LED light fixtures to the kitchen and in front of closets in a hall and bedroom. The retrofit kits were about $25.00 each in a very expensive for everything state, so they would be cheaper elsewhere, and we easily put them in ourselves. We needed an electrician only for adding recessed lights where the were none and that wasn't very expensive either. It was a really simple project for our electrician. Overall it wasn't every expensive and all of those bulbs were expected to last 25 years. We sold the home a few years later and they were all still going strong when we left. What more could a person want? Inexpensive, lasts forever, and uses very little energy!

Anyone interested should check out their local utilities to see if they are offering any programs to help with the cost of switching. Responsible utilities have such programs.
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Old 10-13-2016, 12:53 PM
 
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I've got a hospital full of T8 4' florescent... no plans to retrofit now.

There are many choices when it comes to intensity and color when buying T8 bulbs...

Some that have been lock on in stairways and halls are more than 10 years on...

On the other hand the same bulbs in back office restrooms where they are turned off and on many times a day might last a year...

Application often determines fitness for use...
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Old 10-13-2016, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Southwest
673 posts, read 597,103 times
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Default It's not that complicated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
led's give off a fair amount of heat . they depend on heat sinks to radiate the heat away from the front of the lamp. many led's cannot be used in enclosed fixtures because of the heat . the smaller wattage's being smaller lamps with less surface area run the hottest . a 7w led can see 135 degrees.
LEDs don't give off a lot of heat. Halogens give off a lot of heat.

It isn't that complicated. A person walks into a store and purchases the bulbs in fixtures made for specific areas of the house, or bulbs to go into the kind of lamp they are designed for. There are plenty to choose from and the prices have plummeted now that there are a lot on the market.

It isn't any more complicated than buying any other kind of bulb or fixture. And the retrofit LED kits are super easy to find and click into a previous recessed light hole in the ceiling. We aren't handy at all and we did a bunch of them by ourselves in one day. We'll be dead from old age before those bulbs burn out.
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Old 10-13-2016, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Southwest
673 posts, read 597,103 times
Reputation: 732
Default People need to learn to be responsible

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
One comment on vanity lighting.

One of my neighbors heard my praise for LED and bought 6 for her bathroom vanity... she is not happy with them.

The six 60 Watt bulbs she had in there kept the top of the mirror from fogging and warmed the bathroom... her complaint is the LED don't warm up the area or keep the mirror fog free.

Sometimes I can't win... at least she still has options.
People like your neighbor need to learn to be responsible to their communities, country, and the planet. We are in the midst of a worldwide drought and it isn't going away any time soon, if at all. The southwest has been in a drought for 20 years now (actually, Arizona was in its 12th year of drought when I moved there more than 12 years ago, yet had done nothing to help solar get off the ground there, had no water conservation regulation, and developers were building housing developments unrestrained further into the desert without any plan for how water would be provided longterm!), and California is in the throes of a water crisis. LEDs use less energy and last much longer, which helps with the water problem alone, not to mention cuts down on the need for dirty and/or destructive energy sources like coal and oil. Using less energy contributes to national defense by helping us be more energy independent and conserve our own sources of energy longer. Because LEDs last much longer, they also cut down on what it takes to dispose of them responsibly.

If all she is forced to give up is a mirror that doesn't fog after a shower, well...cry me a river, as they say. (<;
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Old 10-13-2016, 01:08 PM
 
70,789 posts, read 71,170,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgrdr View Post
LEDs don't give off a lot of heat. Halogens give off a lot of heat.

It isn't that complicated. A person walks into a store and purchases the bulbs in fixtures made for specific areas of the house, or bulbs to go into the kind of lamp they are designed for. There are plenty to choose from and the prices have plummeted now that there are a lot on the market.

It isn't any more complicated than buying any other kind of bulb or fixture. And the retrofit LED kits are super easy to find and click into a previous recessed light hole in the ceiling. We aren't handy at all and we did a bunch of them by ourselves in one day. We'll be dead from old age before those bulbs burn out.
135 degrees is plenty of heat . you can cook an egg on the heat sinks of a 7w led .they are less heat but i wouldn't call them low heat . that is why you can't put just any of them in enclosed fixtures . florescent's are low heat not led's . you can't go by just touching the face of an led lamp which is designed to be cool to the touch. the heat is at the base and reflected away from the lamp surface . . .
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Old 10-13-2016, 01:18 PM
 
26,579 posts, read 52,038,772 times
Reputation: 20357
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgrdr View Post
People like your neighbor need to learn to be responsible to their communities, country, and the planet. We are in the midst of a worldwide drought and it isn't going away any time soon, if at all. The southwest has been in a drought for 20 years now (actually, Arizona was in its 12th year of drought when I moved there more than 12 years ago, yet had done nothing to help solar get off the ground there, had no water conservation regulation, and developers were building housing developments unrestrained further into the desert without any plan for how water would be provided longterm!), and California is in the throes of a water crisis. LEDs use less energy and last much longer, which helps with the water problem alone, not to mention cuts down on the need for dirty energy sources. Using less energy contributes to national defense by helping us be more energy independent and conserve our own sources of energy longer. Because LEDs last much longer, they also cut down on what it takes to dispose of them responsibly.

If all she is forced to give up is a mirror that doesn't fog after a shower, well...cry me a river, as they say. (<;
I doubt at 75 she has many pleasures left... or that she is responsible for the fall of Western Civilization.

She lives in Olympia Washington which gets a lot of rain/water...

Going all LED means heat comes from other sources for much of the year.

To compensate she had an electric towel warmer installed... towels simply will not dry in cold and humid conditions.

I can see the situation in AZ could be much different... where folks run A/C much of the year which makes me question why live in such an environment as I have never lived in a home with A/C?

My point is there is not one universal answer appropriate for all... just as when I mentioned raising chicks... I could fill the brood house with LED bulbs and it is not going to keep the chicks warm as a couple of incandescents...

and... as we all know old fashion incandescent are the most benign when it comes to disposal...

Don't get me wrong... I love my CREE LED lighting.
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