U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-13-2016, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
9,125 posts, read 2,996,123 times
Reputation: 13763

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheesesteak Cravings View Post
And what makes you think 60hz behaves any differently through a filament?

Your theory is nonsense.
An incandescent filament glows because its resistance to electrical current heats it. There isn't much ebb in the light produced in a 1/60th-second interval. With a bulb made from clear glass, turn off the current and see how long the filament takes to lose its glow.

I've just learned something else about fluorescent and CFL lights. The older versions of them that had magnetic ballasts, produced a 120-Hz flicker that was known to cause difficulties for persons suffering from some types of disorders, such as autism and Lyme disease and others. Perhaps persons without any special problems might also have been affected. But fluorescent lights that used non-magnetic ballasts eliminated almost all the flutter. It's likely that the college lounge where I long ago made the observations I described earlier, was using the type which had magnetic ballasts.

Last edited by Steve McDonald; 10-13-2016 at 10:05 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-13-2016, 08:59 PM
 
3,196 posts, read 1,812,823 times
Reputation: 8438
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgrdr View Post
People like your neighbor need to learn to be responsible to their communities, country, and the planet. We are in the midst of a worldwide drought and it isn't going away any time soon, if at all. The southwest has been in a drought for 20 years now (actually, Arizona was in its 12th year of drought when I moved there more than 12 years ago, yet had done nothing to help solar get off the ground there, had no water conservation regulation, and developers were building housing developments unrestrained further into the desert without any plan for how water would be provided longterm!), and California is in the throes of a water crisis. LEDs use less energy and last much longer, which helps with the water problem alone, not to mention cuts down on the need for dirty and/or destructive energy sources like coal and oil. Using less energy contributes to national defense by helping us be more energy independent and conserve our own sources of energy longer. Because LEDs last much longer, they also cut down on what it takes to dispose of them responsibly.

If all she is forced to give up is a mirror that doesn't fog after a shower, well...cry me a river, as they say. (<;
The world is a lot bigger than the southwest USA.

My community borders Lake Erie. For all baselines that mean anything, we have a near-infinite supply of fresh water, as does much of the eastern US. What water we use is either recycled through the aquifer, the sewers, or evaporates to be reborn as rain in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and New York.

Regardless, I fail to see how LED bulbs equate to water conservation. My incandescent bulbs used exactly the same amount of water as my LED bulbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2016, 09:01 PM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,257,058 times
Reputation: 20405
Maybe today's LED bulbs will have their own website and International Fame as this 115 year old lightbulb burning the longest in the world in Livermore CA?

As the story goes, Livermore Power and Light Company owner Dennis Bernal donated the bulb to the Fire Department in 1901, a time when there were just one or two electric bulbs in all of Livermore and the modern convenience would have been welcomed by the city's volunteer "fire boys," as they were then called.

The Livermore lightbulb never gets turned off, which many suspect is the secret to its longevity.

The average bulb last for 750-1,000 hours. Livermore's bulb has burned for nearly a million hours


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centennial_Light

Livermore's Centennial Light Bulb
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2016, 09:07 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,016 posts, read 20,323,805 times
Reputation: 22724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheesesteak Cravings View Post
And what makes you think 60hz behaves any differently through a filament? Your theory is nonsense.
Actually, Steve's anecdote is typical and correct.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2016, 09:15 PM
 
1,080 posts, read 801,655 times
Reputation: 627
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolaireSolstice View Post
I wish I had stocked up. I stuck my head in the sand and refused to believe they would actually stop producing them. This past week I put my last incandescent bulb into a fixture, and went off to buy more, only to find my local stores do not carry them. At all. Grrrr....
have you looked at rite aid i know the one near me still has some
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2016, 09:48 PM
 
5,409 posts, read 2,816,274 times
Reputation: 10101
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
LEDs are NOT CFLs, though. A five second google search would confirm this. LEDs are superior in just about every way to obsolete incandescent bulbs from the 19th century.
I didn't say they are the same, and I have always known they are not the same. I should have put the line about hating CFL in a separate paragraph so that nobody would jump to such false conclusions.

I STILL will not sully a house by using CFL bulbs. I may use LED instead of incandescent in the future, only as old bulbs burn out. At this point, no LED has yet to match the nice quality of light put out by my stash of GE Reveal bulbs, so I am sticking with those and sticking with just turning off lights when I don't use them. Even with an LED lamp, I would not leave it on all the time just because it doesn't use electricity. Turning off the light when not needed costs NOTHING, regardless of bulb type.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2016, 03:16 AM
 
71,470 posts, read 71,652,652 times
Reputation: 49050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheesesteak Cravings View Post
And what makes you think 60hz behaves any differently through a filament?

Your theory is nonsense.
the temperature of a filament keeps the incandescent from flickering . florescent run cool and you can even see the light flickers many times when you reach the end of the lamp life or the ballast starts to go bad .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2016, 03:31 AM
 
71,470 posts, read 71,652,652 times
Reputation: 49050
keep in mind lamp life in rated hours is the average . it means at that point 1/2 the bulbs already failed . 50,000 hours means at that point 1/2 the tested samples failed so hours you get may not be anywhere near those figures .

lumens are also another mis-understood spec . that is the amount of light at the lamps surface . that has little to do with candlepower which is the measurement of that light down at the work space. just because a lamp develops a certain lumen level does not mean that lamp is able to focus and harness that light and get it efficiently down to ground level . candle power is related to how that lamp couples itself with the fixture design and gets that light focused and thrown off .

many fixtures performed poorly with cfl's because they were designed for reflecting point sources of light and not linear light . same thing with early led retro kits . the led's had a much narrower spread of light , straight on they were fine but off to the sides they sucked .

what was a bigger issue with florescent is the most popular lamp was the f40cw t12 . it had horrible color rendition . many colors of the spectrum are missing and many study's showed that had a lot to do with fatigue ,headaches ,lack of attention span ,etc.

that is why florescent lamps had to eventually meet a much improved cri index .

Last edited by mathjak107; 10-14-2016 at 04:05 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2016, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Southwest
673 posts, read 599,679 times
Reputation: 732
Default The world

Quote:
Originally Posted by rugrats2001 View Post
The world is a lot bigger than the southwest USA.

My community borders Lake Erie. For all baselines that mean anything, we have a near-infinite supply of fresh water, as does much of the eastern US. What water we use is either recycled through the aquifer, the sewers, or evaporates to be reborn as rain in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and New York.

Regardless, I fail to see how LED bulbs equate to water conservation. My incandescent bulbs used exactly the same amount of water as my LED bulbs.
The world is much larger than all of the United States, and the world has been suffering a water shortage for some time (have you no memory of news reports of famines brought on by droughts?), spreading from countries devastated earlier to countries on their way. Because one place currently has enough or more water than usual does not mean the planet is not suffering a general water shortage. Because your home has plenty of fresh water at the moment does not mean the midwest, southwest, and west coast is not seeing a shortage due to lack of abundant snowfall in the mountains multiple years in a row. Climate change and wastefulness is hurting our water supplies.

Light bulbs use electricity. Water is used to make electricity. Using less electricity means using less water to make electricity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2016, 04:50 AM
 
71,470 posts, read 71,652,652 times
Reputation: 49050
i am also in the business of selling commercial enegy mgmt systems . for years the utility company's gave us such a hard time.

they did not want to much energy being saved . they walk a fine line where they have all this capacity they spent money on and want to be compensated , while they do not want to have to expand that capacity out and spend a fortune up sizing things .

they originally tried to stop us from connecting our gear in to their electric service . today they are much more liberal about it . but they still use demand meters and power factor surcharges to make sure you do not save to much .

a lot of what i did is to design the control panels that controlled the speed of the water pumps and fans in a facility . being able to cut the speed of a pump in times of low demand has a huge energy savings . if you cut the speed in half on what we call variable torque loads like fans and pumps you don't half the energy . you reduce it by a lot more . a 10hp motor acts like a 2-1/2 hp motor .when you cut the speed by 1/2
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top