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Old 05-02-2018, 03:24 PM
 
1,124 posts, read 3,988,437 times
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I moved into a new house that is pre-wired for low voltage landscape lighting, but I have no idea how this works. The builder described the item as "Landscape lighting pre-wire, switch and stub out included (120v 15amp)".

I'm attaching a pic of the gray panel at the front of our house. It looks like there are some electrical wires inside. There is a wall switch inside my house next to my door that controls this.

I'm trying to gain understanding on how this all works. How would a low voltage transformer plug into this box? Doesn't a transformer need to plug into an electrical outlet? Would I need to have an electrician come in and install an electrical outlet here?

I'm having a lighting company come in next week and install a low voltage lighting system (16 LED lights). Is what my builder installed something they will be able to use?

Thanks!
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question about low voltage landscape lighting-landscape_lighting.jpg  
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Old 05-02-2018, 04:19 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
32,960 posts, read 77,475,651 times
Reputation: 41193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Go Blue 99 View Post
The builder described the item as "Landscape lighting pre-wire, switch and stub out included (120v 15amp)".
I'm attaching a pic of the gray panel at the front of our house.
That's a junction box (not panel) with the "stub out" of 120V power.

SOMEWHERE else in the house will be the switch.
Probably not far away or by the front door.

This is for Christmas lights and such.

Quote:
I moved into a new house that is pre-wired for low voltage landscape lighting...
I don't believe the builder said LOW voltage as the wire in the box is NOT low voltage cord.
If I'm wrong... then there will ALSO be a transformer somewhere.

Quote:
I'm having a lighting company come in next week and install a low voltage lighting system (16 LED lights).
Is what my builder installed something they will be able to use?
They'll figure it out.

But it may require adding a transformer outside at the junction box.
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Old 05-02-2018, 04:45 PM
 
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Thanks, that is helpful. You're right, the builder description does not mention low voltage.

If I want to use that for future Xmas lights, what is involved in "adding a transformer outside at the junction box"? Does that typically require an electrician? I have little DIY skill.
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Old 05-02-2018, 05:01 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
32,960 posts, read 77,475,651 times
Reputation: 41193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Go Blue 99 View Post
If I want to use that for future Xmas lights...
set a receptacle (and cover) and you're done.

Quote:
...what is involved in "adding a transformer outside at the junction box"?
For a homeowner? Same job. Plug in the x-former from the Home Depot kit.

Quote:
Does that typically require an electrician? I have little DIY skill.
It requires DIY skill. Depending on codes the LV lighting guy could be the one.
---

To do BOTH the LV and the Christmas lights from the same power and switch...
well, that's gonna take some finagling and this is where I'd bich and moan to the builder:
1) The romex cable in that gray box should have a THIRD wire (red).
2) the GFCI receptacle and weather proof cover should be there now
3) It really should be a 20A circuit.

This is the job you will need an electrician for...
and you really shouldn't have to pay for that.
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Old 05-02-2018, 05:36 PM
 
3,506 posts, read 7,185,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Go Blue 99 View Post
Thanks, that is helpful. You're right, the builder description does not mention low voltage.

If I want to use that for future Xmas lights, what is involved in "adding a transformer outside at the junction box"? Does that typically require an electrician? I have little DIY skill.
Used to be that Christmas lights plugged into 120 V. If they still do then you would want an outdoor (waterproof) outlet.

> I have little DIY skill.

Either get some or hire an electrician. i recommend acquiring DIY skill with things less likely to kill you.
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Old 05-03-2018, 03:08 PM
 
Location: D.C.
2,825 posts, read 3,058,871 times
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I DIY'd my landscape lights two years ago via the Hunter brand from Home Depot. Roughly 25 lights, 600 feet of cord. We had a hot tub put in a few months prior and had the electrician rig up a typical 120 outdoor outlet with cover while he was running the 220v power source from the fuse panel to the hot tub.


As part of my lighting setup, I bought a 600w dual run transformer ($300) that is about 1/2 the size of a typical shoe box. It plugs into that 120 outlet and has a little photosensor attachment that knows when it's time to turn on/off automatically. I needed that top-end transformer because I had wire to run from the side of the side of the house where the transformer is located to both across the front of the house and the back of the house. Whole thing cost me roughly $1,500 to do myself (outside of electrician installing outlet). Honestly, I have had 0% problems with the lights. They're metal, substantial, have been through 2 years of full mid-atlantic seasons, and not one single problem. The other cool thing is, they don't get hot. So come Holloween, I wrap the uplighting in orange and red cellophane to make the entire house look like a big scary pumpkin. Come Christmas, it's green and red.


For Christmas lights, they plug into that same outlet as well. I bought a remote switch thingy for like $20. It plugs into the outlet, and two extension cords plugs into it from the bottom. With a key fob thingy, I can turn on/off the lights from inside and not have to mess with the winter weather.
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Old 11-21-2022, 07:11 PM
 
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I say go seek help from landscape lighting contractors or electricians that are well versed with this kinds of tasks. If you already have one, stay genuine and tell them your concerns prior to installation.
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Old 12-07-2022, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Waitlist
46 posts, read 43,543 times
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bumping this thread, can some one guide me how to use this option provided by Builder: Landscape Circuit - Switch & 2 Stub Outs Which location should I choose to put this ( front or back yard ) ?
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Old 12-07-2022, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
16,626 posts, read 61,373,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmozaffa View Post
bumping this thread, can some one guide me how to use this option provided by Builder: Landscape Circuit - Switch & 2 Stub Outs Which location should I choose to put this ( front or back yard ) ?
Locate them wherever you feel you would use landscape lighting.
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Old 12-09-2022, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,550 posts, read 20,025,196 times
Reputation: 13407
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmozaffa View Post
bumping this thread, can some one guide me how to use this option provided by Builder: Landscape Circuit - Switch & 2 Stub Outs Which location should I choose to put this ( front or back yard ) ?
If two stub outs are included why not put one in the front and one in the back?
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