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Old 09-11-2019, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,752 posts, read 2,884,917 times
Reputation: 4624

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Reinforced 6 inche concrete dome houseswith 6 inch foamed on insulation can withstand tornado winds of 250MPh. Put them on 14 inch telephone poles 12 feet off the ground in a reinforced concrete base, with sliding steel shutters, and you won’t even know there is a storm outside, or the storm surge.

Cover in a structure of a regular square house if you don’t want people outside to know.

I almost built one of these back in 1998.
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Old 09-11-2019, 04:01 PM
 
Location: annandale, va & slidell, la
7,760 posts, read 3,175,374 times
Reputation: 6579
Quote:
Originally Posted by photoman_6 View Post
Two general observations.
I think builders here in the US are prone to using the same old building methods without exploring new ideas. While doing research I was struck by the variety of new innovative building products from other countries (canada, etc) that arent even thought of here. 2x6 instead of 2x4; foam insulation; thermal wrapping; waterproofing materials in the wet areas, such as bathrooms; plastic piping instead of copper tubing; metal roofing, and many others.

Also, it seems than other than older homes being extensively damaged due to wind damage and flooding, the biggest problem seems to be losing electricity for extended periods of time, and I can't understand why we havent been burying utilities for the last forty years.
Our home being build in Slidell, Louisiana is being built to comply with all the latest codes and are spending a little extra for impact resistant glass and extra mechanical structural connections. Even the generator is within a debris surround.
It can be done.
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Old 09-12-2019, 05:56 AM
 
10,298 posts, read 8,407,199 times
Reputation: 14142
Hurricanes along the Gulf coast spawn tornadoes. Build a home to survive a hurricane but it won’t protect from a tornado nor a large storm surge. WHERE you build is the first priority. Next priority is good design. Last priority is quality building materials. Well, actually the last priority is an honest construction company with honest workers. A dishonest company will charge you for the quality materials but use the cheap materials pocketing the difference in price. There are nails and braces made for hurricane resistance. There are storm shutters that can be built into the home that roll down to protect windows from flying debris. You must also factor in a small water storage tank with pumps as well as a fuel tank with automatic generator. With enough money you could build a home that will survive any hurricane.
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Old 09-12-2019, 09:13 PM
 
Location: my little town
1,313 posts, read 447,039 times
Reputation: 1305
Concrete-grade sand is a black market commodity in many parts of the world. Sand and concrete looting may be happening in the Bahamas now. Hurricane resistance can be built with cheap and free materials, but with more labor. Car tires, plastic bottles, dirt, etc. That can last as long as anyone wants to stay, since sea level rise is starting to cover coastal towns and entire islands. Insurers are pulling out of many markets where the risk is too high.
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Old Today, 03:23 PM
 
9,555 posts, read 15,059,259 times
Reputation: 9801
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrtechno View Post
How about this as an option for more resistance?

https://sipschool.wordpress.com/2017...icane-proof-2/
That's talking 130-140mph; not quite enough for a direct hit from a major hurricane (cat 3 has sustained winds under 130, but gusts will be higher), though it should handle anything else short of a tornado.
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