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Old Yesterday, 12:22 PM
 
7,216 posts, read 2,606,550 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wharton View Post
I live in the middle of 34 thousand Amish folks. They somehow have managed to dry clothing, bedding, towels, and sheets every weeks, twelve months a year, out on the line, for the last 250 years or so. I have watched Amish women stand on a covered porch and hang laundry on the line, then pull the line around the pulleys and loft the wash high high over the yard. I've seen this countless times in August and January. In perfect weather and driving rain, and even in the middle of snow storms.

Amish folk have stay at home wives and mothers. And the women's clothes are typically made out of the same type of material. Cotton. No "Wash and Wear" fabrics. For those of us that work outside the home, that's not practical. Oh...and then I guess you'd want me to heat up the ol iron on the hearth and iron those clothes...right?
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Old Yesterday, 12:28 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,933 posts, read 19,045,834 times
Reputation: 24834
I guess someone here forgot that some people live in HOA neighborhoods that don't allow clothes lines . What are those people supposed to do ? no you cant ban dryers .
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Old Yesterday, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Virginia
4,089 posts, read 2,137,050 times
Reputation: 11343
Quote:
Originally Posted by wharton View Post
I live in the middle of 34 thousand Amish folks. They somehow have managed to dry clothing, bedding, towels, and sheets every weeks, twelve months a year, out on the line, for the last 250 years or so. I have watched Amish women stand on a covered porch and hang laundry on the line, then pull the line around the pulleys and loft the wash high high over the yard. I've seen this countless times in August and January. In perfect weather and driving rain, and even in the middle of snow storms.
Ah yes. I remember when my late Mom used to talk about washing all her clothes, including sheets, blankets, and towels in the bathtub (this was during the war years) and then drying them on the back porch railing because they had no other facilities in their suburban apartment. As a small woman, it was backbreaking work for her. She did not remember it fondly and was very proud when she finally got her first electric washer and dryer in the house where I grew up. Neither of us missed hanging the wash outdoors.
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Old Yesterday, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,684 posts, read 25,300,769 times
Reputation: 21031
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
i guess someone here forgot that some people live in hoa neighborhoods that don't allow clothes lines . What are those people supposed to do ? No you cant ban dryers .



WHAT ARE THEY SUPPOSED TO DO, I KNOW WHATi WOULD DO.


THEY SHOULD PUT THE DAM THING UP AND SAY TOO GOD DAM BAD, ITS MY YARD AND ITS A FREAKING CLOTHESLINE FOR GOD SAKE IT ISNT A METH LAB.




it is the dumbest rule ever and everyone should fight it.


Imagine havIng your own home and your own backyard and someonE says no, you cant put up a clothesline in your back yard, like this is some sort of mortal crime.


I find it of utter nonsense that a homeowner cannot have a clothesline, in their backyward.


THE hoa NO CLOTHESLINE THING JUST MAKES ME SO IRATE YOU HAVE NO IDEA.
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Old Yesterday, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
12,084 posts, read 15,703,476 times
Reputation: 12405
Quote:
Originally Posted by wharton View Post
I live in the middle of 34 thousand Amish folks. They somehow have managed to dry clothing, bedding, towels, and sheets every weeks, twelve months a year, out on the line, for the last 250 years or so. I have watched Amish women stand on a covered porch and hang laundry on the line, then pull the line around the pulleys and loft the wash high high over the yard. I've seen this countless times in August and January. In perfect weather and driving rain, and even in the middle of snow storms.
Ask the Amish - Frozen Clotheslines - Amish Wisdom

Quote:
Q. I’m curious about hanging laundry on the clothing line outside in the colder months of the year. Would you please explain a bit how Amish women deal with getting the clothes dry after they are frozen stiff, or is there a technique they use to keep them from freezing?


We put them outside first, even if it’s freezing. Then, we have drying racks situated around heat sources in the house where we hang them after they’re frozen. Having been stiffly frozen on the clothes line gets rid of excess moisture so that the clothes won’t drip as much water in the house as they finish drying.
Since they don’t have a ‘spin’ cycle the clothes are only hung to rid them of excess water, then they rack them next to HEAT.
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Old Yesterday, 01:00 PM
 
1,259 posts, read 841,299 times
Reputation: 4516
Quote:
Originally Posted by UNC4Me View Post
Too many people conflating their personal preferences/opinions into moral issues. Donít like dryers? Donít use one, but stop believing it makes you morally superior than those who do. Same can be said about a whole host of other ďissuesĒ.
Agree 100%
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Old Yesterday, 01:02 PM
 
787 posts, read 1,370,865 times
Reputation: 955
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzzyRules View Post
Rick Steves, on his travel show talks about using clothes that wash and dry easily. He hand washes the clothes in the sink and hang dries them overnight. Inside.

I don't buy the argument that people can't do this or don't have enough space in their house to hang them. Nope. That doesn't sound right.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Rick Steves is talking about living out of a carry-on bag. Washing a single change of clothes and maybe an extra pair of underwear and socks, not a week's worth of laundry for a family of four.

Yes to this. And note the comment about easily wash and dry....There are some specific "Travel Clothes" people buy/make that are meant specifically to be easy wash/quick dry. Your everyday wear is different, and not as quick-dry and resistant to bacteria and such.
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Old Yesterday, 01:18 PM
 
6,755 posts, read 4,683,322 times
Reputation: 13518
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightcrawler View Post
WHAT ARE THEY SUPPOSED TO DO, I KNOW WHATi WOULD DO.


THEY SHOULD PUT THE DAM THING UP AND SAY TOO GOD DAM BAD, ITS MY YARD AND ITS A FREAKING CLOTHESLINE FOR GOD SAKE IT ISNT A METH LAB.




it is the dumbest rule ever and everyone should fight it.


Imagine havIng your own home and your own backyard and someonE says no, you cant put up a clothesline in your back yard, like this is some sort of mortal crime.


I find it of utter nonsense that a homeowner cannot have a clothesline, in their backyward.


THE hoa NO CLOTHESLINE THING JUST MAKES ME SO IRATE YOU HAVE NO IDEA.
Given that most of your post is in shouty caps, I think we all get how irate you are over HOAs that ban clotheslines. You should start a petition in your HOA to overturn the ban given the violence of your feelings.
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Old Yesterday, 01:23 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 660,667 times
Reputation: 2099
Quote:
Originally Posted by raggedjim View Post
Threads like this make me think internet forums should be banned.
You know the way it is with people, you get some really intelligent and enlightening comments and usually mote often, some really ridiculous ones. You just need to focus on the good ones while quickly discarding the rest.
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Old Yesterday, 01:26 PM
 
3,903 posts, read 1,017,572 times
Reputation: 4472
If your apartment doesnít have W/D hookups, itís too small or itís too old. Move.

If you think electricity consumption is a concern using an electric dryer, you must be paying somewhere around $0.25/kWh or more. Again, I suggest you move.

Iím not on some campaign for ďfree dryers for allĒ but this is almost the year 2020. We donít have flying cars or the fountain of youth, and weíre talking about taking away the electric dryer. Line-dried clothes are great if you donít want clothes to shrink further (like a tight pair of jeans) but if you donít want your Hanes plain white crew necks turning into scoop necks, youíre going to benefit from forced hot air.
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