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Old Yesterday, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Kaliforneea
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I have a HE front loader, and I leave the door open (for a week) when the wash is done. I found letting it get dry as a bone removes that mold/mildew smell. Never had that problem with the top loading agitator kind.
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Old Yesterday, 04:23 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
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I dry the rubber sealer with a clean towel and leave the washer slightly open for few hours. Never had any mold/mildew in any of my washers, ever.
Top load washers don't have any visible rubber parts.
I don't like washers with agitators - they are not gentle to the laundry.
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Old Yesterday, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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I am happy with my He washer. I don’t think I have a quick wash cycle thoigh.
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Old Yesterday, 07:12 PM
 
887 posts, read 244,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Also have front load washers since 1980. The ones I owned overseas can warm up water to desired temperature (depends on the setting). That plus an excellent laundry detergent WILL make your laundry spotless clean. ...

The secret to it is not to overload your washer and let the fabrics have the right amount of water and detergent.
People stuff the washers to the top and then wonder why their laundry isn't washed properly.

....

The difference is in laundry habits:
most Europeans wash the clothes the moment it is taken off- a few items at a time - nearly every day and use their smaller automatic washers - which is the dryer as well, no need to wait when the laundry is washed and transfer it to the dryer.
The automatic washer has longer cycles, extremely quiet, uses very little water and detergents, had up to 19 hour delay, washes well in a cold water, but can heat the water if needed. The laundry comes out dry. We have them in the US right now, not too many choices though

The Americans prefer to accumulate huge loads and do it once a week or so. They need huge separate machines for this style of washing. They need hampers to store dirty laundry until it is washed.
The newer machines on the market are not quite acceptable to all Americans, as it is not quite conducive to the way they used to wash laundry. A lot of “ misunderstanding” between the newer type front loading machines and people!

Last edited by Nik4me; Yesterday at 07:24 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 07:16 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,201 posts, read 42,787,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I am happy with my He washer. I don’t think I have a quick wash cycle thoigh.
Mine does. It's been used only a handful of times, probably three, in the four years I've had it. The most recent time was a couple months ago when our granddaughter discovered new and unique ways to create infant art with food.
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Old Yesterday, 07:47 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik4me View Post
The difference is in laundry habits:
most Europeans wash the clothes the moment it is taken off- a few items at a time - nearly every day and use their smaller automatic washers - which is the dryer as well, no need to wait when the laundry is washed and transfer it to the dryer.
The automatic washer has longer cycles, extremely quiet, uses very little water and detergents, had up to 19 hour delay, washes well in a cold water, but can heat the water if needed. The laundry comes out dry.

The Americans prefer to accumulate huge loads and do it once a week or so. They need huge separate machines for this style of washing. They need hampers to store dirty laundry until it is washed.
The newer machines on the market are not quite acceptable to all Americans, as it is not quite conducive to the way they used to wash laundry. A lot of “ misunderstanding” between the newer type front loading machines and people!
How do you know "European habits"? Do you live somewhere in Europe?

I do, and I think it's exactly the opposite.
"Europeans" (can't say that I know every European laundry habits) generally don't wash their clothes "as soon they take them off" - this seem to be more American habit. I noticed that in the US most people wash their clothes after a single use - dirty/sweaty or not. I know people who do few laundry loads every day.
Some wash their bed sheets every day.

Europeans are more environment conscious and don't wash their clothes/towels after single use. It's bad for the fabrics and completely unnecessary. Most don't do their laundry daily, but 1-2 times a week. I do wash mine 2x a month. Have plenty of stuff to wear or use and don't need them to be washed to wear right away.
They will wash their stuff when sweaty or soiled usually right away : sweat promotes mold growing and stains are harder to remove when old.
They do have smaller washers that are extremely energy and water savvy, but their laundry detergents do excellent job, and the washers are capable to heat water to programmed temperature.
They don't need those humongous washers because they don't use those US style king size comforters.
Most use personal duvets that are inside duvet covers, and duvet covers are washed frequently together with bed spreads and pillows covers. Duvets itself are washed 1-2 times a year. Being much smaller they fit into those smaller washers without problems.

Also, while there are options for washer and dryer in one, not everyone use/buy/own them. If possible, most will opt for air drying.
They use for that basement or attic, even in multifamily houses. Small stuff they air-dry on the patio/balcony, garden or in their bathroom.
Only a small % of people can't or will not air dry their clothes. Those usually opt for washer and dryer in one to save space and work.
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Last edited by elnina; Yesterday at 07:59 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 07:50 PM
 
7,213 posts, read 3,968,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
I was wondering, are people misusing the "Quick Wash" cycles on their HE washers, especially those who are used to traditional top loaders? I think this could be partly to blame for the myth that HE washers don't wash as well due to improper usage, since Quick Wash cycles are designed for small, lightly soiled loads. Apparently some just in a hurry not to use the longer Normal or Heavy Duty cycles and are gravitating towards the Quick Wash cycle, leading towards inadequate washing performance for larger loads and hurting the reputation of HE washers. I would never wash my full load of pink shirts on a Quick Wash cycle.
I have a feature where I can press a button that will take a few minutes off the length of the wash time. Is that what you mean? I don't know if that would make that much difference. I use it only when I have a small load and the items are not very dirty. But it might make a difference, if the items are reasonably dirty and it's a full load. There's a reason the manufacturer recommends that time length for the wash cycle.
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Old Yesterday, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Lake Coeur D’Alene
4,950 posts, read 6,716,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
I have a feature where I can press a button that will take a few minutes off the length of the wash time. Is that what you mean? I don't know if that would make that much difference. I use it only when I have a small load and the items are not very dirty. But it might make a difference, if the items are reasonably dirty and it's a full load. There's a reason the manufacturer recommends that time length for the wash cycle.
The newer HE front loader have a specific quick wash cycle. Mine has an 18 minute quick cycle. It was a great change from an earlier front loader that had no cycle under an hour.
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Old Yesterday, 08:15 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
38,993 posts, read 56,847,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post

I worked with college graduate women, so in theory not dumb, who stored their been worn panties and panty hose in the Faculty Room freezer to "clean and freshen them".
This might be incorrect. Do you know as a FACT that they put worn AND filthy panties and pantyhose in the freezer?? Did you do the sniff test after they left the room?

There is a proven truth that NEW pantyhose aka sheers last longer if you put them in the freezer for few hours before first use and even after they are used AND washed. Definitely before first use. I wear those and I tested the durability. They DO last longer after being in the freezer before first use.
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Old Yesterday, 08:35 PM
 
887 posts, read 244,591 times
Reputation: 2342
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
How do you know "European habits"? Do you live somewhere in Europe?

I do, and I think it's exactly the opposite.
"Europeans" (can't say that I know every European laundry habits) generally don't wash their clothes "as soon they take them off" - this seem to be more American habit. I noticed that in the US most people wash their clothes after a single use - dirty/sweaty or not. I know people who do few laundry loads every day.
Some wash their bed sheets every day.

Europeans are more environment conscious and don't wash their clothes/towels after single use. It's bad for the fabrics and completely unnecessary. Most don't do their laundry daily, but 1-2 times a week. I do wash mine 2x a month. Have plenty of stuff to wear or use and don't need them to be washed to wear right away.
They will wash their stuff when sweaty or soiled usually right away : sweat promotes mold growing and stains are harder to remove when old.
They do have smaller washers that are extremely energy and water savvy, but their laundry detergents do excellent job, and the washers are capable to heat water to programmed temperature.
They don't need those humongous washers because they don't use those US style king size comforters.
Most use personal duvets that are inside duvet covers, and duvet covers are washed frequently together with bed spreads and pillows covers. Duvets itself are washed 1-2 times a year. Being much smaller they fit into those smaller washers without problems.

Also, while there are options for washer and dryer in one, not everyone use/buy/own them. If possible, most will opt for air drying.
They use for that basement or attic, even in multifamily houses. Small stuff they air-dry on the patio/balcony, garden or in their bathroom.
Only a small % of people can't or will not air dry their clothes. Those usually opt for washer and dryer in one to save space and work.
Sounds like you could be describing a rural/ small town living in parts of Europe.
Are you trying to say, that wherever you have lived/live in Europe- that the businessman wears the same shirt for the second and third time without washing?
I know, it is silly of me to use the name Europe as a descriptor- still a lot of differences between countries.
I am not going to argue with you about the details of who, where and how regarding differences in laundry habits geographically.
I have never seen bedsheets hanging in high rises in most of the European cities. The machines I described are very efficient to run in terms of electricity.
My point was, that there is a difference in the average family size and the way the laundry handled in the US making the front loaders way of washing not quite the same as the older US washers, which could be easily stuffed to the gills.
Understandably, it would take some time for people here to figure out the details and get used to a different type of washing machines to ensure they get a very clean laundry and no smelly moldy machines.
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