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Old 09-22-2019, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
16,813 posts, read 16,953,229 times
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I was down in this little town called Taft, Ca.......oilfields and quite a bit of related industrial businesses.

Lots of those little houses, no concrete foundation......just the wood-framing, set onto 4x4
wood-footings in the dirt. A lot of them are quite old, but seem to be holding up pretty good.
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Old 09-22-2019, 05:08 PM
 
Location: NC
6,739 posts, read 8,297,674 times
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Is it possible this is built like a pole barn? The structure would be held up by the vertical poles placed at least 5 to 8 ft into the ground. None of the horizontal wood is part of a foundation but it would tie the poles together. I’m thinking that could be pretty stable.
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Old 09-22-2019, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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Interesting thread. I'd never heard of a PWF before. I almost certainly wouldn't use one myself. And, after some quick searching, it seems like the biggest pro of this kind of foundation is a warm, dry basement. So, I don't see the point of using one for a crawlspace.


But, if the engineer says the foundation is sound, then the problems would seem to be cosmetic. Maybe these problems appeared after the house was built, and they were taken care of once. Then, the flippers came along, gutted everything, and now the problems have to be fixed once again? Or, these cosmetic problems were never fixed, which is why the flippers bought the house so cheaply?


Was the weather unusual in your area this year, that might have caused unusual behavior in the wood? (around here, I think some farmers qualified for disaster relief, due to the unusually wet spring, preventing them from putting in their crops on time.)
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Old 09-22-2019, 09:50 PM
 
131 posts, read 62,201 times
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Their kitchen floor slope problem can be easily fixed. One of my rental properties had really uneven floors in the hallway, livingroom and kitchen so I decided to get it tiled and it came out really nice and now the floors are all leveled. I tiled it with a beautiful and durable porcelain tile and it came out fantastic. So just tell them to hire a really good floor guy.
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Old 09-22-2019, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
12,844 posts, read 49,745,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by possibleyou View Post
Their kitchen floor slope problem can be easily fixed. One of my rental properties had really uneven floors in the hallway, livingroom and kitchen so I decided to get it tiled and it came out really nice and now the floors are all leveled. I tiled it with a beautiful and durable porcelain tile and it came out fantastic. So just tell them to hire a really good floor guy.


Or, you can do it the right way and have the floor system leveled.
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Old 09-22-2019, 10:39 PM
 
131 posts, read 62,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
Or, you can do it the right way and have the floor system leveled.
Well maybe they dont have the money for that. OP stated she just wants her daughter to sell the house any way. She said they have a structurally sound letter from an engineer so if she just tiled the kitchen floor I don't think she would have a problem for resale.
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Old 09-23-2019, 06:06 AM
 
1,999 posts, read 688,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
Or, you can do it the right way and have the floor system leveled.
Right way to level a floor that bears on a (wrong way) wood foundation? Might last until the next rainfall or until the termites regain their appetite.

Right way would be to replace the foundation.

Last edited by Rickcin; 09-23-2019 at 06:22 AM..
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Old 09-23-2019, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
12,844 posts, read 49,745,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickcin View Post
Right way to level a floor that bears on a (wrong way) wood foundation? Might last until the next rainfall or until the termites regain their appetite.

Right way would be to replace the foundation.

How many times does this have to be reiterated-
There's nothing wrong with PWF (done correctly)- the issue at-hand is the soil/weather conditions. My response you quoted above was to a response that I'm 100% sure is NOT sitting on a PWF.

RIF.
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Old 09-23-2019, 07:05 AM
 
446 posts, read 133,979 times
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After thirty+ years in the homebuilding biz, I can safely say that like many, many victims out there, your kids paid for a worthless home inspection, from another clueless idiot who was flipping burgers until he became a "professional home inspector". The other issue is that the engineer was another waste of money. Weather can and will create SLIGHT seasonal cracking, sticky doors, etc.. Any idiot who claims that weather causes 2" shifts in a structure needs to be fired. You are facing structural, grading and drainage issues that need to be addressed. There should be several contractors in the region that specialize in this work, and can inspect and propose a legitimate repair. Treated wood foundations have a long history of success. Not trouble free, bullet proof success, but they are a legitimate technique, just like precast concrete sectional foundations are. Correcting these issues, and ending up with a trouble free foundation shouldn't be a huge deal for any legitimate specialist.
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Old 09-23-2019, 01:08 PM
 
Location: NY>FL>VA>NC>IN
2,555 posts, read 1,034,228 times
Reputation: 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by wharton View Post
After thirty+ years in the homebuilding biz, I can safely say that like many, many victims out there, your kids paid for a worthless home inspection, from another clueless idiot who was flipping burgers until he became a "professional home inspector". The other issue is that the engineer was another waste of money. Weather can and will create SLIGHT seasonal cracking, sticky doors, etc.. Any idiot who claims that weather causes 2" shifts in a structure needs to be fired. You are facing structural, grading and drainage issues that need to be addressed. There should be several contractors in the region that specialize in this work, and can inspect and propose a legitimate repair. Treated wood foundations have a long history of success. Not trouble free, bullet proof success, but they are a legitimate technique, just like precast concrete sectional foundations are. Correcting these issues, and ending up with a trouble free foundation shouldn't be a huge deal for any legitimate specialist.
Eh, not really (the clueless idiot part). I now realize the inspector was correct -if the structural guy is also correct- (foundation, though a crappy "rare and oft sued over" design, was/is sound) and in fact tried to wink wink nudge nudge the dummies when he said (paraphrasing) that builders have been sued over these types of foundations and they are rarely seen.

A sensible person hearing that would NOT buy the place. So I don't see where the inspector did anything amiss. Seems he told them something a more experienced person would've taken to heart but these millenial morons chose to pooh pooh.

As to the structural guy, who doesn't do repairs and recommended none (to the foundation as he deemed it sound), I too am skeptical that gap of 2in/stairstep crack/doors swinging shut due to slant don't mean structural damage but perhaps there ARE indeed grading and drainage issues. I got his "report" second hand verbally from my daughter so who knows if she left out part so I wouldn't shame her even further than I already have.

Last edited by VexedAndSolitary; 09-23-2019 at 01:22 PM..
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