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Old 09-26-2019, 04:11 PM
 
3 posts, read 570 times
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Hi, Iím new to these parts. Iím having a home built in Moyock, NC. Recently discovered that 3 of the roof trusses are broken, 2 of which have been Ďrepairedí by sistering new 2x4s on either side of the missing 2x4, which I understand can be a valid fix if designed and approved by an engineer. The 3rd truss Iím not even sure what happened, there appears to be one 2x4 completely broken off with a new one fastened next to it (see pictures) [url]https://imgur.com/gallery/lP0FwDU[/url]
The house has passed framing inspection with no mention of broken or repaired trusses. There is no engineer repair report or anything of the like. When I discovered the questionable trusses I told builder to stop construction at once, only to find out that they went ahead and hung all the drywall the next day. Builder is trying to tell me that the repairs were approved.

Is it reasonable to expect a new build to not have broken trusses? If not, is it reasonable to expect communication about the broken trusses?

Thanks in advance for any insight.
Al
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Old 09-26-2019, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
12,853 posts, read 49,756,493 times
Reputation: 14757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Almous71 View Post
The house has passed framing inspection with no mention of broken or repaired trusses. There is no engineer repair report or anything of the like. When I discovered the questionable trusses I told builder to stop construction at once, only to find out that they went ahead and hung all the drywall the next day. Builder is trying to tell me that the repairs were approved.

Is it reasonable to expect a new build to not have broken trusses? If not, is it reasonable to expect communication about the broken trusses?

Thanks in advance for any insight.
Al


Your timeline makes no sense. If the repairs were approved- that's one thing; if there's an engineer's letter...
Well, that's between the builder, the truss manufacturer, and/or a PE.

You are "buying a house" that is being built. You don't own it! So you have No Control on the build.

Trusses can be easily damaged/broken from shipping and handling- and they can be repaired. Communication can be paramount- but it works both ways! Your tone tells me that you probably got a cold shoulder accordingly.
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Old 09-27-2019, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX
2,040 posts, read 6,167,827 times
Reputation: 3433
Quote:
Originally Posted by Almous71 View Post
Hi, Iím new to these parts. Iím having a home built in Moyock, NC. Recently discovered that 3 of the roof trusses are broken, 2 of which have been Ďrepairedí by sistering new 2x4s on either side of the missing 2x4, which I understand can be a valid fix if designed and approved by an engineer. The 3rd truss Iím not even sure what happened, there appears to be one 2x4 completely broken off with a new one fastened next to it (see pictures) https://imgur.com/gallery/lP0FwDU
The house has passed framing inspection with no mention of broken or repaired trusses.



Not surprised it has passed inspection. Many cities now use the Builder's Third Party Inspection Reports and only perform cursory inspections if that.



There is no engineer repair report or anything of the like.



An Engineer is typically required to address the situation and provide corrective actions. This is done with an Engineering change/repair letter. You can certainly ask the Builder for a copy. If none is present you do have the right to approach the City and ask them to review the condition and have the Builder provide the letter for the Engineering correction.



When I discovered the questionable trusses I told builder to stop construction at once, only to find out that they went ahead and hung all the drywall the next day.



I would fully expect that your purchase contract does not give you the right to direct when construction starts and stops. You should use extreme caution to NOT do that and instead use other avenues available to you. If your builder complies with your demand it is because they can use that to their advantage and it might cost you dearly.


Your other avenues are to:
  • Notify the Build Supervisor of your concerns.
  • If they are not responding as you deem appropriate then notify their next level which is typically an Area Manager.
  • At the same time you are notifying these two parties you do have the right to notify the local City Building Inspections Department requesting they intervene by re-inspecting the condition. However you best be correct and have appropriate references to back your claim up or they will most likely not only not respond but make note of it for future "Not Responding" action.
Obviously during this exchange it is in your interest to fully document the issue and communications with emails, pictures, etc., etc.




Builder is trying to tell me that the repairs were approved.


Ask the Builder to produce the Engineered approval letter for the repairs.


Is it reasonable to expect a new build to not have broken trusses?



Yes and it is reasonable to expect the Builder has complied with any minimum building requirements placed on them. It is also reasonable to expect any broken item be properly repaired which can be replacement or other accepted repair action.



If not, is it reasonable to expect communication about the broken trusses?


No communication needed if an item is damaged but properly repaired.


Thanks in advance for any insight.
Al

Answers in blue above.


Are you monitoring your own build or do you also have an experienced Professional Inspector or other also performing inspections for you? Today more than ever we are in a Caveat Emptor world!
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Old 09-27-2019, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Knoxville
4,308 posts, read 21,074,595 times
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I can't add much to what the above post said. One thing to consider with all this, you will be buying this issue when you close on the house. It will be yours to address when you sell it.
If it was me, I would want the engineers letter in hand (staple a copy to the repairs). A building official may "pass" it even though it does not technically conform to code, just because they decide to.

A few decades ago the building dept in my area was pretty corrupt, and would "pass" stuff, just because the builder was a friend. It was amazing the crap that went up.

Remember, only stuff in writing really matters. It matters little what the builder or the building officials "say", because if it ended up in court they would only deny it. My opinion is based on being an expert witness in dozens of construction related lawsuits.

This is not all that had to resolve, but slapping a couple 2x4's to a broken truss and saying its fine, may not be true. They need an engineer to look at it , and design (and sign off on) a repair. All in writing, with the engineers stamp.
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Old 09-27-2019, 11:59 AM
 
2,001 posts, read 691,487 times
Reputation: 2297
Damaged or broken wood trusses are fairly common since trusses contain a number of different pieces that once properly installed, develop an economical load bearing member.

The good news is that they are easily repaired regardless if it involves the top or bottom cord as well as any web pieces. They are often repaired from one side, however in my critical cases they can be sistered from both sides. The galvanized nail plates can also be replaced or beefed up with plywood gussets that would add strength well beyond the capacity of the nail plates.

Nothing to be over concerned with, just ensure they are properly repaired.
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Old 09-27-2019, 12:19 PM
 
3 posts, read 570 times
Reputation: 15
Thanks for the responses guys. I realize now I was off base by asking them to stop construction. My future next door neighbor is a contractor and has been checking in on the build for me since I’m out of town. He and a couple of guys that work with him are the ones who saw the trusses and told me they looked jackleg repaired and that everyone they talked to said the repairs didn’t look like they would pass an engineers inspection, and that I was paying for a new house and should demand new trusses. Fortunately I haven’t made any demands, other than asking them to stop construction until we could get the truss issue sorted. They called in the structural engineer who actually designed the trusses to come inspect them on Monday and asked that I be there. It seems odd that this wasn’t already done, but at least they asked me to be there during the inspection.
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Old 09-27-2019, 01:23 PM
 
264 posts, read 61,592 times
Reputation: 612
Quote:
Originally Posted by Almous71 View Post
Thanks for the responses guys. I realize now I was off base by asking them to stop construction. My future next door neighbor is a contractor and has been checking in on the build for me since Iím out of town. He and a couple of guys that work with him are the ones who saw the trusses and told me they looked jackleg repaired and that everyone they talked to said the repairs didnít look like they would pass an engineers inspection, and that I was paying for a new house and should demand new trusses. Fortunately I havenít made any demands, other than asking them to stop construction until we could get the truss issue sorted. They called in the structural engineer who actually designed the trusses to come inspect them on Monday and asked that I be there. It seems odd that this wasnít already done, but at least they asked me to be there during the inspection.
Thereís really nothing wrong with being super picky during the construction process on a new build. With the crap they slap up today, you have to watch like a hawk - as youíve seen
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Old 09-27-2019, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
12,853 posts, read 49,756,493 times
Reputation: 14757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Almous71 View Post
Thanks for the responses guys. I realize now I was off base by asking them to stop construction. My future next door neighbor is a contractor and has been checking in on the build for me since Iím out of town. He and a couple of guys that work with him are the ones who saw the trusses and told me they looked jackleg repaired and that everyone they talked to said the repairs didnít look like they would pass an engineers inspection, and that I was paying for a new house and should demand new trusses. Fortunately I havenít made any demands, other than asking them to stop construction until we could get the truss issue sorted. They called in the structural engineer who actually designed the trusses to come inspect them on Monday and asked that I be there. It seems odd that this wasnít already done, but at least they asked me to be there during the inspection.


Oh; so it's second-hand information. Enough said!

If you really want verification, and put your mind at ease- hire your own PE if the builder will allow.

Do you really think THEIR PE will give an unbiased option??? (then again, it's the manufacturer's PE)
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Old 09-27-2019, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX
2,040 posts, read 6,167,827 times
Reputation: 3433
Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
Oh; so it's second-hand information. Enough said!

If you really want verification, and put your mind at ease- hire your own PE if the builder will allow.

Do you really think THEIR PE will give an unbiased option??? (then again, it's the manufacturer's PE)

The OP is better off with his own PE. Manufacturer's do not sell these products to the OP but instead to the Builders. It is in the manufacturer's better interest to make the Builder happy and I have seen that occur.
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Old Yesterday, 08:13 AM
 
3 posts, read 570 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by escanlan View Post
The OP is better off with his own PE. Manufacturer's do not sell these products to the OP but instead to the Builders. It is in the manufacturer's better interest to make the Builder happy and I have seen that occur.
I have contacted an independent PE, but Iíll see how it goes on Monday before I get them officially involved. This builder has a pretty good reputation, and they know Iíll be bringing in my own inspector for the final walkthrough, who will know to pay attention to those trusses. Wouldnít it be in the builderís best interest to make sure theyíre done right?
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