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Old 09-28-2019, 01:29 PM
 
930 posts, read 329,197 times
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I found lots of mice droppings in a few drawers I don't often use. Does anyone have success with sprinkling mint around in drawers etc to repel them? We go away for the winter and I'm trying to put as much as possible in plastic boxes, but I am wondering about scents like mint.
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Old 09-28-2019, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
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They'll just think you're inviting them for dinner!
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Old 09-28-2019, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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We tried this when mice invaded our kitchen. They paid absolutely no attention to the mint. We ended up stuffing steel wool in any openings under the sink and in cabinets, and using traps. Hated to do it, but honestly, you can't have vermin in your food preparation area.
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Old 09-28-2019, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,621 posts, read 46,443,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irootoo View Post
We tried this when mice invaded our kitchen. They paid absolutely no attention to the mint. We ended up stuffing steel wool in any openings under the sink and in cabinets, and using traps. Hated to do it, but honestly, you can't have vermin in your food preparation area.
Yes, but I doubt if she wants to return to a bunch of rotting carcasses.
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Old 09-28-2019, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
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I too found that mint doesn’t work.

Blocking holes does.

A judicious use of traps will get rid of the mice already living in your house, but unless you block the holes, new ones will move in.

It helps to repackage any food you buy that comes in cardboard or paper into heavy-duty plastic containers, but ultimately the only thing that works is blocking holes.

If you have a real infestation, you may need a professional to find all the places where they are getting in.
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Old 09-28-2019, 05:16 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,931 posts, read 3,386,515 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irootoo View Post
We tried this when mice invaded our kitchen. They paid absolutely no attention to the mint. We ended up stuffing steel wool in any openings under the sink and in cabinets, and using traps. Hated to do it, but honestly, you can't have vermin in your food preparation area.
I've done the steel wool trick which helped. I also had my handyman go through the crawlspace to check every plumbing, electrical, or heating system run penetration into the living areas of the house and apply rodent-resistant spray foam. There were spots under the kitchen he couldn't reach to foam, but we plugged those with wool from inside the kitchen. Between the wool and the foam, rodent invasions pretty much ended. I live trap and release the native voles that used to invade the house every fall (usually the worst time as they are searching for warm winter nest spots). Don't have the nonnative house mice here. Before we did this I'd catch at least two voles every night. Now I catch one each winter...a really really determined smart one.

Last edited by Parnassia; 09-28-2019 at 05:28 PM..
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Old 09-28-2019, 06:04 PM
 
930 posts, read 329,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
I too found that mint doesn’t work.

Blocking holes does.

A judicious use of traps will get rid of the mice already living in your house, but unless you block the holes, new ones will move in.

It helps to repackage any food you buy that comes in cardboard or paper into heavy-duty plastic containers, but ultimately the only thing that works is blocking holes.

If you have a real infestation, you may need a professional to find all the places where they are getting in.
I certainly may need a professional, since I could not possibly get to all the holes and neither can my husband. We live in a trailer. But I thank you for all the good responses I got. Also, I am putting clothing in plastic boxes so they don't make nests from my flannel nightgowns, which I noticed they did when I cleaned out a drawer today. :-) So thanks for all your advice and thoughts on the matter.
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Old 09-28-2019, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Billings, MT
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I buy anti-rodent herb/spice packets from Ace Hardware, and put them in my RV for winter storage. They seem to work.
Of course, I also remove all food stuff that is packed in cardboard packages or plastic bags. Cans I do not worry about.
I usually place about half a dozen packets in various places in the RV.
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Old 09-28-2019, 06:40 PM
 
21,737 posts, read 14,418,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cindi Waters View Post
I found lots of mice droppings in a few drawers I don't often use. Does anyone have success with sprinkling mint around in drawers etc to repel them? We go away for the winter and I'm trying to put as much as possible in plastic boxes, but I am wondering about scents like mint.
Scores if not hundreds of studies have proven mint does *not* work as an effective long term deterrent to rodents; this includes commensal rats and mice.

Think about it; species of mint plants have been around nearly long as rodents; if essential oils, fragrance, or whatever of mint was an effective way to control rodents surely by now the population of such pests would have declined and or gone extinct. Clearly that has not happened.

Sure if used to great extent (enough to likely give humans headaches or other side effects) mint oils or whatever *might* deter rodents early on, but then again so does anything "new". Once they got used to the scent they'd simply ignore.

Only effective ways of eliminating indoor infestation of rodents is to deny them sources of food/water, nesting sites, and hiding places. All gaps, holes or any opening that can be exploited must be properly sealed. Once all those things are done then comes trapping and or use of poisons.
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Old 09-28-2019, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,621 posts, read 12,271,104 times
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tried herbs, tried essential oils, tried those plug in repellents.

What worked was traps, steel wool wherever I could find holes, and poison bait placed by an extermination company. And for me, time itself was in my favor as there was open space across the street from me but it's been developed now, and no longer a natural outdoor habitat for mice and other critters just a few yards away
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