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Old 11-18-2022, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
31,632 posts, read 32,817,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wile E. Coyote View Post
I bought this tiny space heater last year. I use it in my den in the winter. It's very powerful; but, does not get hot. It's extremely lightweight and plastic. I think it is a ceramic heater. It heats up my garage until I am sweating in a little over an hour. I used to use those oil filled De Longhi heaters but, I would replace them because they made me paranoid. I finally just decided not to use them any longer.
I loved my De Longhi heater. I lost it in the last move because it was heavy. They're very safe and radiant heat is the best. When they're cooling they're still warm. I grew up with radiators.
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Old 11-19-2022, 01:54 AM
 
Location: Honolulu/DMV Area/NYC
27,745 posts, read 14,705,990 times
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Good thread, OP. I shudder at some of the stuff I've seen at friends' and relatives' houses when it comes to space heater safety. I've told them about the fire hazards I observed (clothing put on the heaters, extension cords (that were loose in the socket no less) being used, heaters in the aforementioned state being left unattended, etc. I'm shocked that none of them have burned their houses down.
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Old 11-19-2022, 08:00 AM
 
Location: WMHT
4,451 posts, read 5,015,607 times
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Talking Micathermic heaters are just as silent as oil-filled, but significantly less prone to exploding

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
Quote:
I used to use those oil filled De Longhi heaters but, I would replace them because they made me paranoid. I finally just decided not to use them any longer.
I loved my De Longhi heater. I lost it in the last move because it was heavy. They're very safe and radiant heat is the best. When they're cooling they're still warm. I grew up with radiators.
Be aware that there was a recall on the DeLonghi oil-filled heaters manufactured between 1980 and 1988.

The trade-off with all oil-filled (what kind of oil do these Chinese factories fill them with?) heaters is that all the "extra" heat you get when they are cooling down is matched by the delay in heating up initially. It's a zero-sum game.

Quote:
Originally Posted by prospectheightsresident View Post
Good thread, OP. I shudder at some of the stuff I've seen at friends' and relatives' houses when it comes to space heater safety. I've told them about the fire hazards I observed (clothing put on the heaters, extension cords...
I like the big mica flat-panel heaters because they give instant radiant heat and don't take up much space.

Mounted on the wall above an outlet, they occupy even less space and are that much safer (can't be knocked over, no need for an extension cord, less chance of draping fabric over them "accidentally", clear of pets and children).
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Old 11-19-2022, 09:00 AM
 
15,740 posts, read 14,118,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonesuch View Post
Be aware that there was a recall on the DeLonghi oil-filled heaters manufactured between 1980 and 1988.

The trade-off with all oil-filled (what kind of oil do these Chinese factories fill them with?) heaters is that all the "extra" heat you get when they are cooling down is matched by the delay in heating up initially. It's a zero-sum game.



I like the big mica flat-panel heaters because they give instant radiant heat and don't take up much space.

Mounted on the wall above an outlet, they occupy even less space and are that much safer (can't be knocked over, no need for an extension cord, less chance of draping fabric over them "accidentally", clear of pets and children).
https://hvactrainingshop.com/types-of-space-heaters/

All space heaters have their positive and negative points. The key is to choose the best option you can afford for the space you’re trying to heat. Small ceramic heaters are fine for small rooms like a bathroom or office but not good for large rooms. Oil filled heaters are good for enclosed rooms like a bedroom for quiet operation and constant temperature regulation. Micathermic heaters can also work in bedrooms and offices and take up less space than oil filled heaters. Thankfully the prices for these types of heaters have come down to become competitive but both oil filled and mica might be more than some can afford or are willing to spend for temporary space heating. We picked an infrared space heater for our living room. We would need two or more oil filled or mica heaters for such a large room. Most oil filled and mica heaters can only handle a room half as big as our living room. Another factor is convection and air circulation. A relative had a convection heater (oil filled radiator) and said it didn’t work. She had her ceiling fan on the whole time. Got her to turn off the fan while the heater was running with the excuse of cleaning it for her. Didn’t turn it back on when I was finished cleaning the fan. She felt the room was warmer now.
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Old 11-19-2022, 11:38 AM
 
22,295 posts, read 65,639,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
https://hvactrainingshop.com/types-of-space-heaters/

All space heaters have their positive and negative points. The key is to choose the best option you can afford for the space you’re trying to heat. Small ceramic heaters are fine for small rooms like a bathroom or office but not good for large rooms. Oil filled heaters are good for enclosed rooms like a bedroom for quiet operation and constant temperature regulation. Micathermic heaters can also work in bedrooms and offices and take up less space than oil filled heaters. Thankfully the prices for these types of heaters have come down to become competitive but both oil filled and mica might be more than some can afford or are willing to spend for temporary space heating. We picked an infrared space heater for our living room. We would need two or more oil filled or mica heaters for such a large room. Most oil filled and mica heaters can only handle a room half as big as our living room. Another factor is convection and air circulation. A relative had a convection heater (oil filled radiator) and said it didn’t work. She had her ceiling fan on the whole time. Got her to turn off the fan while the heater was running with the excuse of cleaning it for her. Didn’t turn it back on when I was finished cleaning the fan. She felt the room was warmer now.
This is something that can make a big difference. When I am running heaters and heating the house up, the temperature near the ceiling can be ten degrees warmer than the temperature at the floor.

I do a couple of things - I have a box fan that I place at the end of a hall where the doors to unheated rooms are closed. The cold air near the floor gets pushed into the rest of the house, but since it has to be made up, the hot air near the ceiling is sucked down to the fan, which then means warm air is being blown by the fan fairly quickly. Within a few minutes, most of the air is homogenized.

I also have a small desk fan on top of the refrigerator near the stove, so heat from cooking can be spread around.

When using the fireplace for heat, the box fan gets moved to maximize that.
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Old 11-19-2022, 01:51 PM
 
15,740 posts, read 14,118,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
This is something that can make a big difference. When I am running heaters and heating the house up, the temperature near the ceiling can be ten degrees warmer than the temperature at the floor.

I do a couple of things - I have a box fan that I place at the end of a hall where the doors to unheated rooms are closed. The cold air near the floor gets pushed into the rest of the house, but since it has to be made up, the hot air near the ceiling is sucked down to the fan, which then means warm air is being blown by the fan fairly quickly. Within a few minutes, most of the air is homogenized.

I also have a small desk fan on top of the refrigerator near the stove, so heat from cooking can be spread around.

When using the fireplace for heat, the box fan gets moved to maximize that.
A use our ceiling fans reversed and at low speed. We mainly use the central air for heat. With a convection type heater you need the natural convection to heat the whole room. Using a ceiling fan (in relative’s case it was blowing down at medium speed) defeats the convection. Either off or reversed in low speed would be better.
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Old 11-20-2022, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Canada
5 posts, read 699 times
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I had a problem with the heating system at home. It was hot in one room and cold in the rest of the house. Adjustments with tvr didn't help and we used an electric heater. I was constantly worried that it wouldn't cause a fire. So my husband and I decided to fix the system and put modern radiators for the house. I don't know what the cause of the heating problems was, although the repairmen explained it a few times. But I am glad that everything is fine now and there is no need to use the heater.
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Old 11-20-2022, 09:40 AM
 
15,740 posts, read 14,118,851 times
Reputation: 22539
Quote:
Originally Posted by seylen View Post
I had a problem with the heating system at home. It was hot in one room and cold in the rest of the house. Adjustments with tvr didn't help and we used an electric heater. I was constantly worried that it wouldn't cause a fire. So my husband and I decided to fix the system and put modern radiators for the house. I don't know what the cause of the heating problems was, although the repairmen explained it a few times. But I am glad that everything is fine now and there is no need to use the heater.
Our problem isn’t the central heat, it’s the poorly insulated walls. Home was built in 1973 and it still has the original wood paneling (now painted). Home exterior is brick. Walls now are cool to the touch. We don’t have the funds to replace the paneling with drywall along with the wall insulation. I’ve heard there’s a way to inject or blow in insulation into the exterior walls without removing the paneling but I’m not sure about that.
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