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Old 12-09-2008, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
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I moved in to a new place and have already managed to water damage the linoleum tile in the bathroom. A couple of the tiles around the toilet have edges that are rising up a little. New Mexico is such a dry state, I am really surprised this happened. Is there something I can buy from Home Depot to fix it? Or should I call a tile repair person? Any and all suggestions appreciated.
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Old 12-09-2008, 03:41 PM
 
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Default Don't go blaming yourself.......

Very, very common problem.

Part of it, the wood around the toilet typically becomes damaged. Area where there can be leakage at times, also an area where any water spilled or whatever can find a spot to get into that can cause damage. Wood can become a bit punky around toilets.

Plus you don't give any details about the tile. If those cheap self stick ones, yep they don't stay stuck around toilets.

Typical good fix is remove the tile completely. Use contact glue to reinstall, may or may not have to remove toilet to do it. If you have a new spare tile, good time to replace it. Can do all the tiles around the toilet using contact glue, those self stick creatures just do not have the oomph. See the problem a lot in certain spots in kitchens too. Same fix.
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Old 12-09-2008, 05:10 PM
 
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DON'T USE CONTACT CEMENT. It will be hell to get up if you ever want to change the tiles..Get a tile mastic for the type of tiles on the floor... And a tile trowel to put it down with... It's not hard to do...Google putting down tiles..
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Old 12-09-2008, 05:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Houston3 View Post
DON'T USE CONTACT CEMENT. It will be hell to get up if you ever want to change the tiles..Get a tile mastic for the type of tiles on the floor... And a tile trowel to put it down with... It's not hard to do...Google putting down tiles..
Naw use the contact glue.

All those other mastic, glues, whatever will basically have the same problem. Once water pentretrates the wood fibers, they also give up the ghost. You can get the contact glued tiles out. Ain't rocket science, a bit of heat from a torch and they give it up. Hey, it ain't such a big deal, usually you go over the old tiles anyway. Even with contact glue in the horrible baths even the contact glue might eventually give up. Got to solve that water problem, being able to find the end grains of the wood opening for the toilet.

The real problem is to seal the area well around the toilet. Prevent water from getting down into the underlying wood if at all possible. Plumber's putty under the toilet, whatever to keep that water out of there.

In the really bad cases that wood under the toilet rots out completely. Tiles have nothing to cling too no matter what you do. Be sure to let the wood air dry out good, if you try to reglue the tile with any method.
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Old 12-09-2008, 06:17 PM
 
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I don't see where they said anything about wood floors. I took up a kitchen floor and it was put down with mastic and it was hard to get up..I didn't think I would ever get it up.

And I think she/he is talking about 12 x 12 tiles and you should never put one over the old one, imperfections in the old one will show thru .
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Old 12-09-2008, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
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You said linoleum. Linoleum is sheet goods. What you have is vinyl tiles. You can take the above advice which is just fine.

A better way if you can afford it is to yank all that old crap up and do ceramic, marble or other type tile. You will have to lay wonder board first.

A less expensive idea: If the floor is a mess you can lay quarter inch lauan overlay which you will put down with liquid nail from a caulking tube and screw it down over your old floor. Now you have a smooth workable surface. Then you can lay sheet vinyl also called Linoleum. It could be a do-it-yourself job if your handy enough.
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Old 12-09-2008, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Sometimes Maryland, sometimes NoVA. Depends on the day of the week
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Like the others said, there are ways to fix it but you need to solve the water problem first. Personally, I'd pull the toilet and replace the wax ring. Well, honestly, I would have DH pull the toilet and replace the wax ring While the toilet was up, I'd check the condition of the subfloor (assuming its wood), clean up any mold, reglue the vinyl, and finally have DH replace the toilet.

Oh wait... I did that whole process once.
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Old 12-09-2008, 10:03 PM
 
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Default Yeah, you got the picture......

Quote:
Originally Posted by rubytue View Post
Like the others said, there are ways to fix it but you need to solve the water problem first. Personally, I'd pull the toilet and replace the wax ring. Well, honestly, I would have DH pull the toilet and replace the wax ring While the toilet was up, I'd check the condition of the subfloor (assuming its wood), clean up any mold, reglue the vinyl, and finally have DH replace the toilet.

Oh wait... I did that whole process once.
Like all these threads the OP did not fill in many blanks.

But what they are calling linoleum tiles are probably the thin el-cheapo vinyl 12 x 12" or something like it. Normally they don't put it down over anything but a wood sub floor. Toilet leaks a bit or water gets spilled. Makes its way into area where the wood has been cut out for the drain opening of the toilet. Presto, the end grain areas absorb water like crazy, it perks thru the wood, tiles no longer stick. Over time the entire process acts like a cancer, wood rots out around that entire general area. Can take a while.

You can have the Armstrong tiles which are much thicker but usually they do not come pre-glued. Hey, I have even put those suckers in a bath using contact cement. Loved to have been there when the next guy tried to get them out. I will say, they tend not to become "Loose".

You must solve that cause before anything will work permanent. It is also a matter of degree. Hey, when in doubt hit that sucker with contact glue. It appears to work even if the cancer is still eating up the floor.
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Old 12-10-2008, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Sometimes Maryland, sometimes NoVA. Depends on the day of the week
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To add an adendum, I just remembered that when I did it, I ended up having to replace a section of subfloor under the toilet because it was so rotted. The joys of buying a former rental unit to live in. :\
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Old 12-11-2008, 11:04 AM
 
540 posts, read 2,032,818 times
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Here's the deal:

What you have may, in fact, be linoleum, which is produced in tile as well as sheet goods. It is more likely, though, that you either have a solid vinyl tile or a vinyl composition tile (VCT), or the peel 'n' stick tile (which is also a VCT, but decoratively stamped or embossed.)

Regardless of what you have, it needs to be replaced, right? So, let's find the source of the problem, solve it, and put in a new floor.

You most likely have a leak around the flange of the toilet. Perhaps a crack in the porcelain. That would make it leak outside the wax seal and it would puddle and seep (Sounds like an English dessert, doesn't it?). That would cause the tile to draw up or curl at the edges because the adhesive bond was compromised by the water. So, take the toilet out, and examine the area. Is it still wet? Dry it off. Look at the edges of the subfloor. Is it swollen, soft or damp? How far does that condition extend? Okay, if it's wet/damp, cut away the damaged subfloor, patch it back to the original limits with a CD/X grade plywood. Don't remove the balance of the old flooring just yet. You may not need to at all.

Now, what kind of new flooring do you want? Give me that info and I can assist you further.

Regards,
Streamer1212
Flooring and ceramic specialist for over 30 years.
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