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Old 12-09-2008, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Sometimes Maryland, sometimes NoVA. Depends on the day of the week
1,501 posts, read 7,741,962 times
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So you read about my earthworm backup. Well, after having the rooter and camera out today (and the bill to go with it), we found my line is NOT collapsed There is probably a small hole somewhere where they are getting in, but since the line isn't under pressure, its not a huge concern. A "someday you should consider replacing the lline" and "well, its 40 years old and could go any day" concern, but not an immediate concern.

However, the plumber did recommend "jetting" the line to get rid of scale, slime, grease, etc. Said it will keep us flowing smoothly and prevent another backup (which may or may not have earthworms in it ). The company he worked for did not offer this service, so its not like he was trying to sell me on more service. But, I am always skeptical of special services. So, has anyone heard of this? Is it snake oil or real?
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Old 12-09-2008, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Seaford, Delaware
3,362 posts, read 10,460,211 times
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Becasue the line is not under pressure, the water/sewage flows with gravity. this allows the scum to build up. jetting the line will put fast high pressure water through the line and wash out all the scum stuck to the sides and bottom. they don't put pressure on the line, just put high pressure water through the line. If the line slow it a good thing to do to keep it flowing better. It will make the line more open to it's original width. It might be worth it if your having back ups. the worms won't go away, they still want the moisture.
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Old 12-10-2008, 12:15 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
11,765 posts, read 27,380,976 times
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I've had lines jetted. You don't need it.

Jetting lines is a really kewl thing, but think of it as a colonoscopy from a dominatrix with a pressure washer. It might seem like an exciting idea at first, but if your pipes burst, you are screwed, and unless you have a cast iron stamina, you are going to have a bigger problem than a few worms.

Jetting lines is generally reserved for larger lines under severe conditions. The water will rip open bad joints, tear off root fragments, but not resolve any underlying problems. The only real reason I have ever seen to resort to jetting is a build-up of sand and dirt that can't be removed effectively by other methods.
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Old 12-10-2008, 02:20 AM
 
3,020 posts, read 16,704,610 times
Reputation: 2442
Default Get the backhoe........

If you really got sewer line problems, there is only one thing that will fix it. Get the backhoe in and replace it. Nothing like new heavy wall PVC to make your day.

I just went thru this exercise this summer. Guessing about what might be the condition of the sewer line. Research said part of it had been replaced. Finally got the backhoe, nothing was going down that puppy.

Found 40 feet of old steel drill pipe used as a drain line, jury rigged at both ends. It was indeed plugged solid for like half its length. Color me surprised how they ever got a 40 foot hunk of steel line into that position. Probably an old used drill pipe recycled for a drain. Wonders never stop. Didn't cost me all that much money, but a lot of cussing and scars. It did get jacked up and cut out. I got the pixs to prove it. Even the backhoe could not start to lift that sucker out. It is amazing what actually can be down there.

Once you have so many sewer line problems, never mess around. Get that backhoe and have at it. At some point, you are throwing good money after bad. A new slick clean sealed line solves a lot of problems. Theory, experts, wild new methods, high tech cures and speculation are wonderful things, nothing beats seeing it bare and beautiful laying in the sun. I also found the ladies will not go down in a ditch.
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Old 12-10-2008, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Sometimes Maryland, sometimes NoVA. Depends on the day of the week
1,501 posts, read 7,741,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I've had lines jetted. You don't need it.

Jetting lines is a really kewl thing, but think of it as a colonoscopy from a dominatrix with a pressure washer. It might seem like an exciting idea at first, but if your pipes burst, you are screwed, and unless you have a cast iron stamina, you are going to have a bigger problem than a few worms.
I was thinking about it this morning, and the bursting pipes occured to me. If the line already has small holes (re: earthworms), then I would think a very high pressure water hose runs the risk of damaging the pipes and causing the collapse we thought we already had. That would make the situation so much worse. If that is a risk at all, I think I'd rather not.

Quote:
Once you have so many sewer line problems, never mess around. Get that backhoe and have at it. At some point, you are throwing good money after bad.
Well, in 18 months, this is our first sewer line problem. And the 80% blockage we had is now gone. We are going to hold off on replacing it for now (its Christmas, the ground is freezing, etc). It will be on our list of things to consider, but until we start having repeated backups, I think we are going to go with it. But I reserve the right to come back in a few months and say I was wrong. LOL

eta: You might have been referring to my comment in another thread last night about the wax ring on the toilet and water damage under the toilet. That was a different house and about 6 years ago.

Last edited by rubytue; 12-10-2008 at 08:19 AM.. Reason: clarifying something
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Old 12-10-2008, 12:51 PM
 
2,217 posts, read 484,979 times
Reputation: 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I've had lines jetted. You don't need it.

Jetting lines is a really kewl thing, but think of it as a colonoscopy from a dominatrix with a pressure washer. It might seem like an exciting idea at first, but if your pipes burst, you are screwed, and unless you have a cast iron stamina, you are going to have a bigger problem than a few worms.

Jetting lines is generally reserved for larger lines under severe conditions. The water will rip open bad joints, tear off root fragments, but not resolve any underlying problems. The only real reason I have ever seen to resort to jetting is a build-up of sand and dirt that can't be removed effectively by other methods.
I second that!

Jetting is not only an unnecessary expense, but it can create HUGE problems.

There are better ways to keep you sewer line open.
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Old 12-10-2008, 12:53 PM
 
2,217 posts, read 484,979 times
Reputation: 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by rubytue View Post
Well, in 18 months, this is our first sewer line problem. And the 80% blockage we had is now gone. We are going to hold off on replacing it for now (its Christmas, the ground is freezing, etc). It will be on our list of things to consider, but until we start having repeated backups, I think we are going to go with it. But I reserve the right to come back in a few months and say I was wrong.
If you paid somebody to run their camera down there, you should be able to get your money's worth by having them actually show you exactly what the line looked like. That might answer some questions regarding just how bad the line actually is.
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Old 12-10-2008, 01:53 PM
 
14,205 posts, read 26,395,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmic View Post
If you really got sewer line problems, there is only one thing that will fix it. Get the backhoe in and replace it. Nothing like new heavy wall PVC to make your day:
Here we do a lot of "Burst Pipe" or Trenchless replacements...

A single continuous length of new pipe is pulled through the existing pipe... it's cost effective if the alternative requires trenching through concrete driveways and such.
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Old 12-10-2008, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Sometimes Maryland, sometimes NoVA. Depends on the day of the week
1,501 posts, read 7,741,962 times
Reputation: 1003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filet Mignon View Post
If you paid somebody to run their camera down there, you should be able to get your money's worth by having them actually show you exactly what the line looked like. That might answer some questions regarding just how bad the line actually is.
I saw it. There were no visible breaks, but there has to be a break somewhere due to the worms. There was a lot of crud on the sides, and I could see that it wasn't a smooth pipe anymore. But, I have no reference for comparison as I have never seen in really good pipes vs. average pipes vs. really bad pipes. All I have to go on is the word of the plumbers.

The original guy they sent our was very nice and I felt very honest. I trusted him. He talked to me so I could understand. My electric, framing, painting, drywall, etc knowledge is pretty high (for a handy homeowner married to an electrician), but we know nothing about plumbing. Anyway, when they had to call out the power snake-thing, the first plumber was sent home and I was left with a team that I did not like. The mechanic was a fast talker, talked down to me, and just seemed really "slick." Which is why I got to questioning the whole thing. Anyway, DH is going to talk to some of the plumbers he works with about it (we would have asked them to do the work, but we needed company tools). Anyway, the second camera run with with the slick guy, not the nice guy.

Quote:
Here we do a lot of "Burst Pipe" or Trenchless replacements...
Can you tell me more about that? The line we are talking about is maybe 15-20 feet (only from house to the septic tank). There is some hardscaping above it, but its those stack-it-yourself blocks, no mortar, no concrete.
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Old 12-10-2008, 07:57 PM
 
43,264 posts, read 47,151,929 times
Reputation: 13720
Actaully that is how the city does line that clog in my city. It does a very good job as long as they know whatt they are doing.
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