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Old 01-22-2009, 06:57 AM
 
167 posts, read 1,040,674 times
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We are buying a house and radon inspection showed that its concentration fluctuates between 26.5 to 5.5 with an average reading of 10.3 which is much higher than acceptable level (i.e. 4). We have to ask seller to install the fan in the crawl space in order to remove or reduce the concentration of radon.

Does anyone have the same problem? What is the concentration of radon after installing fan? Which is the most effective method to avoid high exposure to this radioactive gas?

Thanks
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
998 posts, read 3,485,200 times
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You need to have it mitigated to acceptable levels.. which should be no higher that 4.0 pico curies per liter of air after installing the system. One of our local mitigation contractors is: Radon Testing Labs that might help answer some of your questions.
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Cary
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The sellers of our current house put in one of these systems before placing it on the market, and it reads 0.0 all the time now (it was right at 4 before), but is in the crawlspace part of the basement if that makes any sense. It was only a grand or two, so make sure they do this. Don't let their headache become yours - literally and figuratively.
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Wake Forest
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Definitely get a radon specialist in to check it all and recommend the best way to get rid of it.

Leigh
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Old 01-22-2009, 08:32 AM
 
Location: ITB Raleigh NC
447 posts, read 1,057,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trusam View Post
We are buying a house and radon inspection showed that its concentration fluctuates between 26.5 to 5.5 with an average reading of 10.3 which is much higher than acceptable level (i.e. 4). We have to ask seller to install the fan in the crawl space in order to remove or reduce the concentration of radon.

Does anyone have the same problem? What is the concentration of radon after installing fan? Which is the most effective method to avoid high exposure to this radioactive gas?

Thanks
My girlfriend had the same type of issue, I think she sends back the one year test this month. I know that as soon as they put in the system (plastic in crawlspace, with a fan venting out the gas) the levels dropped to under 3, I think it was in the teens before. She had the sellers pay for it.

I never had a radon test for my house before buying because I find the logic and science a bit faulty.
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Old 01-22-2009, 08:39 AM
 
9,080 posts, read 18,841,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckreis View Post
I never had a radon test for my house before buying because I find the logic and science a bit faulty.
I have experience in air monitoring and I'm not sure I follow your concerns about the science. There is more than one way to test for Radon. Some methods are more accurate than others, that much is true. However, what are your concerns over the logic of testing?
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Old 01-22-2009, 09:58 AM
 
Location: ITB Raleigh NC
447 posts, read 1,057,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Raleigh_Guy View Post
I have experience in air monitoring and I'm not sure I follow your concerns about the science. There is more than one way to test for Radon. Some methods are more accurate than others, that much is true. However, what are your concerns over the logic of testing?
Oh the testing I am sure is fine, my problems are with the idea of radon causing lung cancer and other health issues. I am not saying anyone should not have it done, and if you are concerned about it, make sure to get things tested and taken care of. Same goes for mold or any other thing you feel will cause adverse effects for your health or your families health.

Well I will say that I do have problems with testing and mitigation being done by the same company, I think those two things should be done by different companies. I am sure most are honest folks, but one bad apple could cause a lot of problems for the industry as a whole.
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Old 01-22-2009, 10:23 AM
Status: "Bored With The Yardarm" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Holly Springs
3,533 posts, read 6,035,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckreis View Post
Oh the testing I am sure is fine, my problems are with the idea of radon causing lung cancer and other health issues. I am not saying anyone should not have it done, and if you are concerned about it, make sure to get things tested and taken care of. Same goes for mold or any other thing you feel will cause adverse effects for your health or your families health.

Well I will say that I do have problems with testing and mitigation being done by the same company, I think those two things should be done by different companies. I am sure most are honest folks, but one bad apple could cause a lot of problems for the industry as a whole.
I more or less agree with that sentiment. I test for radon (but do not do mitigation, conflict of interest) and yes, it can cause lung cancer. Unless you have very high readings (in the teens or higher imo) the chances are very slim though and it takes years of exposure. You can look up all the info at Radon | Indoor Air Quality | US EPA
Keep in mind though, the study is based on 24/7 exposure with no changes in environment. I can tell you from reading 5,000 or more test printouts the levels change drastically throughout the day in many cases. The lawyers and media have gotten a hold of it, much like the overblown mold scare and made more out of it than is really there.

For the OP. The highest reading I ever came across was 135! After mitigation we retested and it was under 1.0. At 135, I would be quite worried!
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Old 01-22-2009, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,417 posts, read 18,013,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sacredgrooves View Post
I more or less agree with that sentiment. I test for radon (but do not do mitigation, conflict of interest) and yes, it can cause lung cancer. Unless you have very high readings (in the teens or higher imo) the chances are very slim though and it takes years of exposure. You can look up all the info at Radon | Indoor Air Quality | US EPA
Keep in mind though, the study is based on 24/7 exposure with no changes in environment. I can tell you from reading 5,000 or more test printouts the levels change drastically throughout the day in many cases. The lawyers and media have gotten a hold of it, much like the overblown mold scare and made more out of it than is really there.

For the OP. The highest reading I ever came across was 135! After mitigation we retested and it was under 1.0. At 135, I would be quite worried!
I wish this would be sent back to the NC forum as this is an issue that is happening more and more in NC, especially the Raleigh/Wake Forest area.

There are n'hoods in the Raleigh/Wake Forest area that seem to have higher radon readings. I think we are finding more radon because more people are having the tests done. This is a good thing.

Everyone should be more aware of this and expecially in some areas of Wake County.


Vicki
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Old 01-22-2009, 04:37 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
2,510 posts, read 1,401,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trusam View Post
We are buying a house and radon inspection showed that its concentration fluctuates between 26.5 to 5.5 with an average reading of 10.3 which is much higher than acceptable level (i.e. 4). We have to ask seller to install the fan in the crawl space in order to remove or reduce the concentration of radon.

Does anyone have the same problem? What is the concentration of radon after installing fan? Which is the most effective method to avoid high exposure to this radioactive gas?

Thanks
My name is Mike and I am a New Jersey DEP licensed radon specialist with 20+ years experience.....I do some testing but mostly I personally mitigate homes with excessive radon levels....about 150 a year. You information is lacking a bit in areas but from what I read this house is constructed on a crawl space rather than a basement. First....I would wonder if the crawl space vents were open at the time of testing....if not....they should be. They're supposed to be open ALL year to provide air circulation and prevent moisture build-up. My next question would be to ask if the crawl space floor is dirt or if its a concrete slab. If its a concrete slab then the mitigator has to provide a suction point to remove the radon from under the floor slab....if its a dirt floor then the mitigator has to lay down wall to wall plastic sheeting and seal all seams.....this acts as a barrier from which the mitigation fan can pull air/radon from under. How much the rado level drops depends upon how much air the system can move.....if its a concrete slab floor without gravel under it then it becomes much harder for the mitigation fan to suck air and the radon levels won't drop as much. The mitigator MUST be licensed and must follow EPA/DEP radon mitigation protocol. This requires a building permit and electrical permit and the work must be inspected by the Township upon completion of a satisfactory post mitigation radon test. Most reputable mitigators will give a 5 year warranty on their systems as thats what the better fan manufactures (Dyna-Vac, Radon Away and Fan Tech) give on their fans. Please feel free to post here or DM me if you have any further radon testing or radon mitigation questions.
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