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Old 03-14-2007, 08:01 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
6,708 posts, read 11,136,604 times
Reputation: 5867
Default Does Febreze really work or is it just perfume?

I made the mistake of pan frying some salmon tonight for dinner and now the house smells like fish. Actually, now it smells like Febreze. Someone is coming to look at the house tomorrow so I can't let it air out naturally. Hack hack hack...

I've never been able to decide if there was actually an odor neutralizing chemical in it or whether if is just perfume.

If there is an odor neutralizing chemical, how come you can smell the perfume? Isn't perfume an odor?

These kinds of housekeeping mysteries perplex me. And no, I don't go in for smelly candles too often.
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Old 03-14-2007, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Missouri
2,813 posts, read 8,962,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellie View Post
I made the mistake of pan frying some salmon tonight for dinner and now the house smells like fish. Actually, now it smells like Febreze. Someone is coming to look at the house tomorrow so I can't let it air out naturally. Hack hack hack...

I've never been able to decide if there was actually an odor neutralizing chemical in it or whether if is just perfume.

If there is an odor neutralizing chemical, how come you can smell the perfume? Isn't perfume an odor?

These kinds of housekeeping mysteries perplex me. And no, I don't go in for smelly candles too often.
I'm not sure if I can say whether Febreeze actually eliminates or only provides a temporary odor cover. I like the way it smells and when I was selling my house, I'd been smoking in an upstairs bedroom for a few years, usually with the window open and a fan blowing behing me, but it still smelled like smoke (I quit smoking in Nov.05!). I used Febreeze and it seemed to work, but I had to do it every day and really saturate the curtains and futon in that room along with the carpet to get it to stick a long time.
I'll bet it'll work for a showing. You might also try leaving baking soda boxes open around the kitchen for awhile or bake chocolate chip cookies, cut a lemon and leave it in a bowl of water or an orange, etc.
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Old 03-15-2007, 07:24 AM
 
Location: a primitive state
6,708 posts, read 11,136,604 times
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Left a window open all night. The house still smells like Febreze - flowery. Fish smell is gone. Was worth the trouble; great meal.

I'm not baking cookies, however. You're too funny...
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Old 03-15-2007, 09:09 AM
 
571 posts, read 1,822,152 times
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No need to go near that stove!

Having sold four homes with lots of unscheduled viewings, I'll tell you what saved my sanity.

If you can find a dealer who carries McCall's candles, they make several in baked good scents that are wonderful. Also cranberry, spice, etc. Get a couple. I switched over from Yankee a long time ago. These are great for around the same price.

Fire them up in the morning and have a pot of coffee ready to run through. I don't drink coffee, but the smell is always homey.

Do this even after it's warm enough outside to open up. Anything that eliminates wet dog smell is a holy grail. How your house smells may seem like a small thing, but it really does make a big difference.

Good luck!
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Old 03-15-2007, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Austin 'burbs
3,226 posts, read 9,467,836 times
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We bought one of those already made Costco pies - and popped that in the oven all day at a low temperature. We had showings through out the day - and it really worked. We also added smooth jazz playing in the kitchen - we were told time and time again that the "environment" and "setting" was very nice, calm, smelled good - etc. We had nothing but good feedback... it really does make a difference.

Febreeze works, but it's temporary. We have some couches in our playroom that are in good condition - but our dogs have laid all over them for years. They have a "smell" - not a bad, stinky smell - but just a smell. I only smell it when I sit on them. When I febreeze them - the smell goes away for a bit - and eventually comes back.

If you have a showing tomorrow, I would Febreeze, but I would also keep all the windows you can, open, for as long as possible today - and tomorrow too. AND do the pie thing.
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Old 03-16-2007, 10:00 AM
 
1,284 posts, read 3,161,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenbar View Post
Febreeze works, but it's temporary.
I agree, and it's the same with "Oust" and other sprays. What I found that really works (if you have carpet) is Arm & Hammer Pet Fresh Carpet Deodorizer. It's really strong at first, but mellows out and smells good for days.
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Old 03-22-2007, 09:59 AM
 
1,769 posts, read 5,060,813 times
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Default Febreze

Quote:
Originally Posted by ellie View Post
I made the mistake of pan frying some salmon tonight for dinner and now the house smells like fish. Actually, now it smells like Febreze. Someone is coming to look at the house tomorrow so I can't let it air out naturally. Hack hack hack...
I've never been able to decide if there was actually an odor neutralizing chemical in it or whether if is just perfume.
If there is an odor neutralizing chemical, how come you can smell the perfume? Isn't perfume an odor?
These kinds of housekeeping mysteries perplex me. And no, I don't go in for smelly candles too often.
I agree that it is just basically a perfume. Worst than that, my wife and I and our two toddlers both had noticeably irritated sinuses after spraying down our couches with it. It is because of this I would recommend not using it if you're about to show your house - my children and I are not prone to allergies, so I've ruled it out as just a sensitivity issue.

I've always enjoyed the nice smell of good candles - if you have odors you wish to cover up or replace, perhaps that would work for you. Vanilla, or better yet with the aroma of cookies you cannot go wrong (most everyone I've met like those a lot).
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Old 03-23-2007, 12:59 AM
 
31 posts, read 153,946 times
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I use a chemical free cleaner that can be used to spray and get rid of smells or put in a carpet cleaner. It's got a ton of uses. Some people may think it smells string to start with, but it's better than the alternative and the scent fades quickly.

I just noticed MBUSZU's comments about the kids and wife. A lot of cleaners are irritating and people don't realize how bad they are. You noticed the sinus irritation, what do you think that kind of stuff does to your lungs?
I didn't realize the affects celaners cold have until my vet suggested my carpet cleaner as a cause for my dogs recurring urinary infections. We couldn't confirm that was the reason, but it was a reality check for me. The dog is on the floor a lot and her sensitive parts are in contact with the carpet and whatever I put on it. They can cause skin irritations, allergies, asthma attacks etc.
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Old 03-23-2007, 10:02 AM
 
Location: a primitive state
6,708 posts, read 11,136,604 times
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I have a few candles but rarely burn them due to the fact that I'm a space cadet. My favorite solution to the bleh smell of an unfragranced house are dried stems of eucalyptus in an arrangement somewhere in a room.

The problem though, was not a chronically stinky house, but simply figuring out what to do about that temporary cooking odor left over from dinner. I use a minimum of chemicals in my home to begin.

Moral of the story, don't cook fish when your house is for sale.
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Old 05-24-2007, 10:31 PM
 
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I've tried Febreze, but it only provides a temporary cure. However, a friend turned me on to the Bad Air Sponge, and I think it works great! It takes the odor out of the air, it doesn't just mask it. I get mine at goodbyestinky.com Has anyone else tried it?
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