U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 02-12-2009, 02:12 PM
 
381 posts, read 1,121,223 times
Reputation: 233

Advertisements

We're replacing all the carpeting in our new-to-us home. The previous owners were smokers, and the carpet is in bad shape anyway. To save a few bucks, we're doing the carpet removal/disposal ourselves. Do we have to remove the tack strips, or can they be reused? Which is the best way to go?
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-12-2009, 02:35 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
15,717 posts, read 16,467,360 times
Reputation: 42929
They could possibly be reused, but I'd take them up. Carpet co. would probably prefer to use new. Think that they are pretty cheap.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2009, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Marion, IN
8,192 posts, read 25,665,819 times
Reputation: 6969
As the wife of an installer I can tell you that if they are not rotten you should leave them down. If they are falling apart from moisture pull them up.

The installer, who will make $2.00-4.00 per yard for installing your carpet (based on the type of carpet), has to pay for the tack strip himself. This is not part of the cost of the job but is considered part of the installer's responsibility. So if your tack strip is intact save yourself a little work.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2009, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Pocono Mts.
9,494 posts, read 10,091,916 times
Reputation: 11348
I say leave them if they aren't moldy or deteriorating....but be careful, those suckers are real sharp.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2009, 06:48 AM
 
559 posts, read 2,859,803 times
Reputation: 756
I'm a flooring professional. No need to remove them unless they are dry rottted or moldy/mildewed.

Regards,
Streamer1212
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2009, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
15,039 posts, read 44,830,424 times
Reputation: 21713
Only place I would remove and replace them is in the doorways. Sometimes the points can get pounded down from heavy furniture being moved. Often these have a different aluminum strip with an edge guard and need replacing anyway.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2009, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
857 posts, read 4,118,882 times
Reputation: 773
I am remodeling a house to flip and I just pulled up all of the carpet and pad. I onlypulled up the tackstrip where it looked damaged but left about 80% of it on the floor. It saved me a lot of work, and the installer was more than happy to reuse the old nad not have to put in new strip.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2013, 09:29 AM
 
1 posts, read 25,825 times
Reputation: 10
I had two handy men install new carpet. They took out old tackstrip and did not put any in before putting in new carpet. Will this cause problems?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2013, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
10,205 posts, read 39,280,981 times
Reputation: 10389
Quote:
Originally Posted by P Haamilton View Post
I had two handy men install new carpet. They took out old tackstrip and did not put any in before putting in new carpet. Will this cause problems?
Depends on the carpet.
Maybe it was a glue down?
Maybe you hired a couple of boneheads?
Maybe...
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2013, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Cold Springs, NV
4,576 posts, read 7,739,018 times
Reputation: 4963
Quote:
Originally Posted by P Haamilton View Post
I had two handy men install new carpet. They took out old tackstrip and did not put any in before putting in new carpet. Will this cause problems?
Tack strips are used, so the carpet can be stretched taught to minimize bunching, and or trip hazards. As long as yours lays flat you may be okay. A professional would have used tack strips. Glue down is typically a commercial installation, and most likely not applicable to a residential application.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $99,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top