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View Poll Results: Are you concerned about lead paint in your house affecting your health?
Yes, very much so, it worries me. 1 4.35%
Somewhat, but it's not something I think about much. 1 4.35%
Not at all. 21 91.30%
Voters: 23. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-21-2009, 09:35 AM
 
791 posts, read 1,210,742 times
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I'm contemplating starting a business doing on-site lead paint testing in peoples houses. Unfortunately, the EPA and state authorities require that I take a "training course" to do so, which costs anywhere from 300 to 800 dollars. (To teach me what I already know or could easily pick up from a book, grrrrr) Before I do this, I'd like to test the waters and see if anyone would be interested. I'd charge $50 - $100, depending on how extensive the testing was.

Any input would be deeply appreciated.
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Old 03-21-2009, 11:00 AM
 
24,843 posts, read 31,241,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildCardSteve View Post
I'm contemplating starting a business doing on-site lead paint testing in peoples houses. Unfortunately, the EPA and state authorities require that I take a "training course" to do so, which costs anywhere from 300 to 800 dollars. (To teach me what I already know or could easily pick up from a book, grrrrr) Before I do this, I'd like to test the waters and see if anyone would be interested. I'd charge $50 - $100, depending on how extensive the testing was.

Any input would be deeply appreciated.
I am not sure where you live but, HUD has funds for this. Check with your county to register.
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Old 03-21-2009, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
19,879 posts, read 36,379,125 times
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Unless your house was built before 1978 (mine was actually built in the 1930's), it's not an issue. For older homes, yes, one should be aware of it and, perhaps, have testing done.
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Old 03-21-2009, 11:27 AM
 
7,079 posts, read 33,722,918 times
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There are LOTS of cheap, accurate lead paint testing kits on the market that homeowners can do themselves. I think you'd have a hard time making a living doing this.
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Old 03-21-2009, 12:10 PM
 
24,843 posts, read 31,241,247 times
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The money is in the clean up.
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Old 03-21-2009, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
5,615 posts, read 12,418,809 times
Reputation: 2525
Not worried - my place was built in 1992.

I'll chime in and agree that the real money is in the cleanup. Kind of like asbestos abatement.
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Old 03-21-2009, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Seaford, Delaware
3,457 posts, read 16,661,326 times
Reputation: 2593
I have old houses built in the 30's and 40's. i had to sign a lead paint waiver for every one of them when I gought them. the only real problem with lead paint is if it is peeling or you have little ones who a apt to chew on the wood. Like kids will chew on a window sill when looking out the window. I don;t rent to anyone with little kids. I've also painted over any paint that was there and or removed the paint and repainted.
I would think that people would only need testing if they plan to remove the paint. If it is lead, it takes EPA rules and HUD inspections to do it if you tell.
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Old 03-22-2009, 08:47 AM
 
791 posts, read 1,210,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viralmd View Post
There are LOTS of cheap, accurate lead paint testing kits on the market that homeowners can do themselves. I think you'd have a hard time making a living doing this.
I have a document promulgated by the Department of Labor that calls me to question how accurate they are. False negative results are a problem, especially if the test is being conducted by an amateur. There are ways around these interferences that I would use, because I'm not an amateur - I used to test for lead using AA, ICP, and the colorimetric dithizone method. These false negative results can be avoided using proper sample prep techniques.

Last edited by WildCardSteve; 03-22-2009 at 10:17 AM..
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Old 03-22-2009, 08:49 AM
 
791 posts, read 1,210,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShaneSA View Post
I have old houses built in the 30's and 40's. i had to sign a lead paint waiver for every one of them when I gought them. the only real problem with lead paint is if it is peeling or you have little ones who a apt to chew on the wood. Like kids will chew on a window sill when looking out the window. I don;t rent to anyone with little kids. I've also painted over any paint that was there and or removed the paint and repainted.
I would think that people would only need testing if they plan to remove the paint. If it is lead, it takes EPA rules and HUD inspections to do it if you tell.
The paint doesn't have to be peeling.

You can also get lead contamination from dust shed from surfaces that rub, or where there is friction, like door jambs and windows.

And, there really is no safe level of exposure, particularly for children.

Last edited by WildCardSteve; 03-22-2009 at 10:17 AM..
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Old 03-22-2009, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
5,615 posts, read 12,418,809 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildCardSteve View Post
The paint doesn't have to be peeling.

You can also get lead contamination from dust shed from surfaces that rub, or where there is friction, like door jambs and windows.

And, there really is no safe level of exposure, particularly for children.
There's a safe level of exposure for everything - radiation, lead, even water. Small amounts for the first two, much larger for the third. It's when you exceed that level that the problems begin.
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