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Old 05-06-2009, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Elkins, WV
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I know this is somewhat dependent on use and range settings, but I am wondering about an approximate guess on how much propane one might use with a propane stove/oven combo. It is standard size, 4-burner, with a 200 lb tank. Again, I know this is somewhat subjective, but guesses would be appreciated!!
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Old 05-06-2009, 12:51 PM
 
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Why not check with a propane dealer they should have charts which they bases the size tank on. Alot will depend on the family size and the number of appliances. Have to looked on line?
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Old 05-06-2009, 12:53 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley
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I have a propane stove top and electric ovens combo (has 2 ovens) and in 16 months for a family of two and a whole mess of visitors (several per month) we've gone through 35 gallons, according to the gauge.
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Old 05-06-2009, 01:00 PM
 
Location: San Marcos, CA
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We had a small BBQ sized tank, maybe 20 lbs? I cook fairly frequently and we refilled about every 4 months. 200 lbs would have lasted us 2 years plus.
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Old 05-06-2009, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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It really does depend on how much and how you use the range, particularly the oven. But 200# of propane would last at least several months, even if you are baking and roasting a lot.
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Old 05-07-2009, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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You should easily get a year and a half to two years. We have a 250 gal tank that we use for the range top, and we sometimes use that top for supplemental heating on the coldest days, when the heat pump is inefficient. After about a year and a half we are just now considering getting another 200 gal.
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Old 05-07-2009, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Elkins, WV
374 posts, read 716,023 times
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Thanks everyone! That is about what we are using, but we wanted to check out what others experience has been. I think it might need to be checked out because we smell propane recently lingering in the kitchen. Anyway, thanks for the replies!
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Old 05-07-2009, 12:26 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
We have a 250 gal tank that we use for the range top, and we sometimes use that top for supplemental heating on the coldest days, when the heat pump is inefficient.
Isn't that a carbon monoxide build up risk, unless it's vented? And if it's vented, aren't you venting heat out? I have a propane "portrait" stove (looks like a woodstove but isn't) and it has a huge (8") vent out the back.

Product Guide - Detail - Avalon (http://www.avalonfirestyles.com/product_guide/detail.aspx?id=250 - broken link)
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Old 05-07-2009, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
Isn't that a carbon monoxide build up risk, unless it's vented? And if it's vented, aren't you venting heat out? I have a propane "portrait" stove (looks like a woodstove but isn't) and it has a huge (8") vent out the back.

Product Guide - Detail - Avalon (http://www.avalonfirestyles.com/product_guide/detail.aspx?id=250 - broken link)
No. Unvented heaters are common in our neck of the woods. Propane burns into carbon dioxide and water vapor. Only if there is insufficient oxygen to support full combustion is there any significant danger of CO buildup. Otherwise, the simple act of cooking a pot roast on a propane stove would be hazardous to your health.

We have a monitoring CO alarm that tells the PPM and it has never shown anything above zero while doing using the burners for additional heat. However - it DID show a reading one time when a burner set on low flamed out and was leaking propane, so I know that the detector circuit is fully functioning.

The greater danger is of overheating the area around the stovetop. The one time I did let things go too long I discovered that the vent fan in the bottom of the above-the-stove microwave automatically comes on when the heat is too great. Since then I've figured out safe settings that work to my "can I place my hand on the hot combustible surfaces?" test.

Just so you understand, I use the stove this way NOT as a complete replacement of the heating system, but to overcome issues with the way heat pumps work.

At night, we only use an electric space heater in the bedroom and set the heat pump to mid fifties. In the morning, the kitchen area is quite cold, so I turn on the burners, set the heat pump so it only is 2 degrees above the temperature of the room, make coffee, start a fire in the fireplace, and feed the cat. By then the heat pump has gone off, so I inch it up another 2 degrees and so on, until the room is is the low sixties. By then I can turn the burners off or way down and the fireplace has started to heat up.

Note that the draw of the fireplace alone, with a fire going, is enough to obviate any CO issues. By working my heat sources this way, I prevent the secondary resistance heat of the heat pump from kicking in on cold mornings. The output from the stove burners not only heats the kitchen area, but adds humidity, which is needed in the cold winter months. The coldest days of the winter are the days we plan to make a simmering soup or pot of beans. Those go for a couple of hours, and the heat again does a double purpose of cooking the food and partly heating the living space.

If you had a small apartment and used the burners like this, you might run into issues, so I can't recommend what I do for everyone.
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Old 05-07-2009, 05:49 PM
 
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Any gas stove or furnace not vented is a hazard. They should never be unattended.People have gotten away with it for years but alot have not .
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