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Old 07-28-2009, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Keller, TX
5,669 posts, read 5,305,683 times
Reputation: 4082

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I'm having a new house built.

It's very humid outside; it's been raining for days and the humidity is around 95%. The wood inside my house is moist.

They're installing foam insulation today.

Problem?
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Old 07-28-2009, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX
2,083 posts, read 6,270,507 times
Reputation: 3502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nepenthe View Post
I'm having a new house built.

It's very humid outside; it's been raining for days and the humidity is around 95%. The wood inside my house is moist.

They're installing foam insulation today.

Problem?
Hello Nepenthe,

There are different types, and manufacturers, of sprayed in foam insulation. You would need to know the type, manufacturer and the manufacturers installation instructions.

In general the answer would be yes, there is a potential for problems later. Spray foam insulation is generally sprayed on wet and need a dry surface to adhere to. Not only can a wet substrate prevent it from creating a strong bond, if the sheathing is wet it can potentially trap additional moisture in the sheathing between the foam (if it adheres properly) and any external vapor barrier on the home. This can cause additional problems later if it does not dry.

Here is a good document from the Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance that is a general guide for the installation of Polyurethane Foam style insulation. Again you need to know the type they are spraying and the manufacturers installation requirements. http://www.sprayfoam.org/downloads/pdf/AY%20112.pdf

I would most certainly approach the builder/insulator about your concerns. Have them show you the installation requirements and where it states it can be applied on a wet substrate.

Good luck!
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Old 07-28-2009, 12:08 PM
 
27,889 posts, read 35,011,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by escanlan View Post
From above .pdf:

Quote:
SURFACE PREPARATION
1. When a primer and/or vapor retarder is
specified, there must be adhesion between
components of the system to secure the entire
system against movement.
2. Prior to application of primer, vapor retarder or
spray polyurethane foam, the surface must be
cured, dry, free of loose dirt or any
contaminants that may interfere with adhesion
of any of the respective components.

3. Contaminants may be removed by use of air
pressure, vacuum equipment, hand power
broom, chemical solvents, sandblasting, manual
scraping, etc.
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Old 07-28-2009, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Keller, TX
5,669 posts, read 5,305,683 times
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It ended up coming down to 60% humidity and no rain; the foam looks good although a bit light in the attic. Fingers crossed it ended up dry enough...

I will be going back over it with the foam from Lowe's.

Thanks for the link!
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Old 07-28-2009, 04:05 PM
 
27,889 posts, read 35,011,834 times
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Let's hope so. The cost of the damage that can be caused by trapped moisture is devastating... Did you at least get a warranty on the work and material?
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Old 07-28-2009, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Keller, TX
5,669 posts, read 5,305,683 times
Reputation: 4082
There's a three year warranty on the entire insulation job.

I'm relatively satisfied. They spent over twelve hours at my house! It ended up being a warm, dry day -- but the way things have been it easily could have turned into a grey windy wet downpour -- so unsettled lately. The attic insulation was layed on satisfyingly thick -- I estimate two feet in spots!

Anyway, this morning I was somewhat worried but my fears were assuaged. Just want to get stone and brick on the outside and drywall on the inside now.

Thanks!
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