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Old 07-29-2009, 06:51 PM
 
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Bleach when it reacts with gunk off gases chlorine gas which is very corrosive. Don't use bleach. they make pan tabs for condensate lines which uses enzymes to keep the drain free. If it's completely clogged use a wet/dry vac. Also don't use that guy again if he continues or is adamant about using bleach around your coil.

Quote:
Coil corrosion seems to be more prevalent in high humidity regions. However, our research revealed that the indoor environment is a much bigger factor than geographical or climate-based issues. Pollutants in the home environment are a primary contributor to coil corrosion and subsequent failure. This is especially true in newly constructed homes, where the building materials often emit high levels of corrosion-causing agents. Because today's homes are better sealed and insulated to conserve energy, they are also better at trapping these corrosive agents.
Fan Coils and Evaporator Coils - Carrier
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Old 07-29-2009, 06:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HoustonPrince View Post
I had a new a/c system installed about a month ago and no COH inspection was performed. No float switch was installed so I called the COH's mechanical inspection department at 713-535-7755 just now to confirm that an inspection should have been done and if a float switch is required. The inspector, Jim, replied that an inspection is indeed required but the float switch is not for residential installs.
It's not required but if the secondary clogs and you don't catch it it can still overflow. The float switch goes inline with the power to the contactor so when the primary does clog the unit shuts off and you can't help but notice.

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Old 07-29-2009, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Hopewell New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstone View Post
Your mileage may vary, but my drain pipe runs from the attic down to behind a bathroom sink, clamped to the P-trap where it enters the wall.

If it gets clogged, the water will spill into a pan that has a safety float switch hanging off it, so if the water level gets too high it will shut down.

If you don't have a shutdown switch (old school) then you'll need to keep it clean unless you want a flood. Bleach might work the same way as Drain-o, as they both contain sodium hypochlorite.

Bogus Info
Note: CLOROX (Bleach) is a solution of Sodium Hypochlorite.. Drain-O is Aluminum flakes ( to provide agitation during the chemical reaction) and the active ingredient is Sodium Hydroxide.

Sodium Hypochlorate and Sodium Hydroxide are Very different things.

If you doubt this ,next time you do laundry put Drain-O, ( Lye {Sodium Hydroxide}) and Aluminum flakes) in your washer load and note the reaction and the lack of wearable clothing after the spin cycle completes..



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Old 07-29-2009, 07:25 PM
 
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Household Products Database - Health and Safety Information on Household Products

Quote:
Sodium hypochlorite 007681-52-9 <10
It has more Sodium Hypochlorite <10% than than Sodium Hydroxide <2%. I have a feeling the chemical reaction between the two is what heats the pipe up and causes the bubbling that occurs when it's poured into the drain. I personally use Sulfuric Acid as a drain cleaner.
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Old 07-29-2009, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Hopewell New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJon3475 View Post
Household Products Database - Health and Safety Information on Household Products

It has more Sodium Hypochlorite <10% than than Sodium Hydroxide <2%. I have a feeling the chemical reaction between the two is what heats the pipe up and causes the bubbling that occurs when it's poured into the drain. I personally use Sulfuric Acid as a drain cleaner.
The percentage of various chemical compunds isn't the most important variable. The reactivity of the in question materials is what counts.
Sodium Hydroxide is extremely caustic...the opposite of acidic.The reaction is between the Sodium hydroxide and the Aluminum. It's Very exothermic and liberates lots of gas which produces the "scrubbing bubbles" effect. Sodium hydroxide in industry has many uses not the lest of which is to etch the surface of aluminum parts prior to anodizing or plating . Aluminum if left unattended in a Sodium Hydroxide solution will in time, be completely dissovled.
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Old 07-29-2009, 08:13 PM
 
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Thanks, I don't use Draino. I was just pointing out the MSDS sheets that say both chemicals are in the product. I do use Sodium Hypochlorite on a daily basis along with Muriatic Acid, Sodium Bi-Carbonate, Soda Ash (not so much), Calcium Hypochlorite and Cynuric Acid.
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Old 07-29-2009, 08:28 PM
 
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You have two drain lines. One runs to the house piping from the evaporator coil. The other is from a pan under it which if the coil leaks or the other cloggs will drain outside the house. Both need to be checked every once in awhile, the pan under the coil that runs outside shopuld not drip really unless the coil develops a leak. You can use a shop vac to vacumm the line then run a little bleach with water thru the line to the outside.
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Old 08-08-2009, 05:47 PM
 
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Default AC Drain Clogged too

I just had an A/C guy out as I saw water coming out of my auxiliary drain line. I knew my main line was clogged and he confirmed it and told me he "blew" it out and all was well. The auxiliary line was no longer draining the unit and the pan was dry. Twenty-four hours hence and my wife noticed water streaming down our front window, both inside and out. The upstairs bathroom lavatory was absolutely full and overflowing. I disconnected the trap under the sink thinking it was clogged, but noticed water was continuing to drip. My plumber told me by phone that it was the A/C drain line again, but I'm at a loss as to how to unclog it. My wife said that the A/C guy had what I'm guessing was a small air compressor. As of right now, I haven't gotten a return call from him and it's getting hot in here. I, of course, turned off the unit to stop the flow of water. Any suggestions short of calling someone else?
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Old 08-09-2009, 09:29 AM
 
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Okay, the A/C guy did come out last night...at no charge I might add. Rather than an air compressor, he had a small tank of what I think was freon. He found where the drain line hooked up with the sewer line in the attic and blew it out. He then poured water down it to make sure it was draining. It was not! He proceeded to try to blow out the line from the bathroom as he was sure the drain line from the A/C to there was clear. Again, no luck. So I guess I have a sewer line blockage. He said to try this stuff from Home Depot that comes in a black bottle, but I'm a bit reluctant. He assured me it was the best stuff he had found, but he couldn't remember the name of it. It must be pretty caustic as the bottle is packaged in a plastic baggie. Short of that, I'll have to call a plumber. Any ideas?
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Old 08-09-2009, 11:17 AM
 
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Sounds like sulfuric acid.
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