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Old 09-21-2009, 04:42 PM
 
165 posts, read 544,396 times
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A house I'm looking at has an electric stove, bleah. The garage and gas water heater are on the other side of the house, would that likely be where the gas line comes in? Would it then be a bigger deal to run a line to the wall where the stove hooks up? How much do you estimate this would all cost?
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Old 09-21-2009, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
15,969 posts, read 14,433,021 times
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It could be costly if there are no gas hookups in your kitchen. I have multiple gas hookups here but none in the kitchen, and I was quoted up to $1,000 just to run a gas line through the crawlspace under the kitchen. Total run would be less than 50 feet.
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Old 09-21-2009, 07:33 PM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 14,474,232 times
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It's hard to tell what it's going to cost.

First of all, do you know there is NOT a gas line run to the stove? My wife loves gas, hates electric - regarding stoves anyway... Just last year we sold our used electric range and bought a new gas one. Fortunately for us, we had a gas hook-up already in place.

Pull the electric stove away from the wall and double check.


So... If there's no gas line already in place, get a couple estimates. If the house is within city limits, and it's on natural gas, call the gas company. That's your best place to start. If its' in the country, and runs off LP, call the LP supplier.
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Old 09-21-2009, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Rural Central Texas
3,162 posts, read 5,814,738 times
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I had propane run in my house and they used flexible gas lines. MUCH easier and cheaper to install than traditional iron pipe. If you don't already have pipe in the wall, check what that option costs in your area.
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Old 09-22-2009, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Knoxville
3,351 posts, read 10,920,412 times
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The gas pipe has to be "sized" for the appliance its going to feed. If you add a range on the end of a line that is serving a water heater, and maybe a heating unit, you will probably have poor performance from the range when the water heater and heating unit are running.

Like Omaha suggested, start with the gas provider.
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Old 09-23-2009, 11:10 AM
 
5,748 posts, read 7,318,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
It could be costly if there are no gas hookups in your kitchen. I have multiple gas hookups here but none in the kitchen, and I was quoted up to $1,000 just to run a gas line through the crawlspace under the kitchen. Total run would be less than 50 feet.
Wow! Things are expensive in Texas. I had gas lines run to both a laundry room (through a crawl space) and to the kitchen (punched up through the basement floor), along with several other small plumbing jobs for about $700.
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Old 09-24-2009, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan and Sometimes Orange County CA
15,819 posts, read 32,425,087 times
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Gas lines are easy to install and can be fun too. I have added or moved gas lines in every house that we have rented or owned. I read a chapter on gas lines in a DIY book, called my brother a couple of times and went right to it. After the first one, it is really easy. Just requires some planning.

I change out an electric stove for a gas stove at our old house for less than $20. I think that it took less than 2 hours (not counting shopping for materials). However there was a gas line that passed right under the kitchen. It was no big deal to instal a T and run a gas pipe up through the floor. We had about 3' crawlspace on that part of the house. A basement woudl be even easier. A house on a slab could be more difficult, unless you have exterior gas lines or a gas line at a wall opposite where you want the stove.

The next time I change from electric to gas, I was able to do it with just bits of black pipe that I had laying around that I never got around to returning after not using htem ont he previouus effort. That one cost $0

The nice thing is that you can then split the 220 volt stove line and get two additional 110 circuits in your kitchen. It is probably not a code permitted modification, but it can be done without hurting anything. (your outlets will be out of phase, but with modern appliances, that does not matter anymore).

If you do "T" into your furnace line, you need to make certain that the gas line is big enough to handle both items. You may have to run a parallel line from the meter. The further you go, the larger gas pipe you need to use. It is really very easy to do and kind of fun. Black pipe is fairly pricey. When I was unsure what size I would need, I just bought a bunch of different sizes and returned what I did nto use. That way you do nto end up running back to the store constantly. Be sure to use the right kind of thread tape (specifically for gas lines, do nto use normal plumbers tape). Put dish detergent with a tiny bit of water on the joints and look for bubbles. If it bubbles, you have a leak. Take the whole thing apart and start over (after you try tightening up the threads a bit first). When you are done with the whole thing, the gas company will bring out a sniffer to make sure that nothing is leaking.

Flex line is cheaper to install, but the material is very pricey. You just reminded me, I have some of it in the garage, I should put it on craigs list and get rid of it.
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Old 09-25-2009, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Knoxville
3,351 posts, read 10,920,412 times
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Splitting a 240V stove circuit for two 120V outlet circuits is wrong just so many ways.
1. The circuit is likely a 30, 40, or 50 amp circuit. Well over the 20 amp maximum suggested for wall outlets.
2. The circuit may not have a ground wire. Not a great idea.
3. You will be sharing a neutral wire, also not a great idea.
4. Not allowed by code.
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Old 09-25-2009, 10:51 PM
 
43,177 posts, read 47,049,205 times
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If your runing the gas line with blacvk pipe be sure you know waht your doing, Threading and assembling gas pipe means you have to know what your doing and now to test. There are many gas fires every years and even explosions caused by faulty work.
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Old 09-27-2009, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Pomona
1,955 posts, read 5,431,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
If your runing the gas line with blacvk pipe be sure you know waht your doing ...
Yep. Gases will find a leak through a smaller hole than water will, so anything less than 100% isn't good enough. If your last DIY plumbing project was installed with leaks, PLEASE don't do your own gas lines!!

As for materials ... black sch.40, threads that are cut smoothly (no nicks at all), yellow PTFE tape or pipe dope, and soapy water to test for leaks is a minimum here.
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