U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-22-2010, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 33,329,150 times
Reputation: 7038

Advertisements

I was poking around in the hardware store over the weekend and found myself face-to-face with a heat-pump water heater. I had never seen or heard of one before and have become slightly intrigued by the idea.

It seems to me that SE Texas would be an ideal environment to run one of these, but I'm feeling like this would have a lot more moving parts and be a lot more maintenance intensive and unreliable than a gas fired water heater and would probably cost more to run in local electricity markets than I spend on natural gas.

Anyone care to review the product?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-22-2010, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,845 posts, read 51,301,408 times
Reputation: 27662
In your climate, I can't imagine it costing more to run, unless you happen to have a gas well on your land. Think room air conditioner, running in reverse.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2010, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 33,329,150 times
Reputation: 7038
Well, I get that it's a reverse evaporator/compressor unit but even running the ultra-efficiency mode at 550W for 12 hours per day is only going to slightly outperform the gas water heater. GE seems to think that I'm looking at something like 13.4 kWh per day for a 2.6 occupant home, which would be something like $43/month on one of the most competitive electricity plans. In the summer months our total gas bill is usually $35 or less, most of that being the water heater.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2010, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,845 posts, read 51,301,408 times
Reputation: 27662
You might be better off cobbling together a solar pre-heater then. Simplest form is an old hot water tank stripped of the jacket and insulation, and stuffed in a small box with one big window on the south side.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2010, 10:28 AM
 
Location: WA
5,293 posts, read 20,701,286 times
Reputation: 5622
I was shocked at the high price if the HP units and wondered if it would ever pay to install one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2010, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Northern NJ
450 posts, read 1,472,883 times
Reputation: 227
Try to catch this weekend's episode of Ask This Old House on PBS (weekend of Feb. 27-28); their coming attractions showed that the next episode will discuss these units.

Rhys
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2010, 10:52 AM
 
48,519 posts, read 81,013,914 times
Reputation: 17978
I know lots of people that have thei elcetricr hot water heater as part of their heat pump system but none that actually have a heat pump water heater.It salways eher they do not have natural gas tho. Everyone I know that has natural gas has it as the water heater with their heat pump.More seem to be more interested in better heatign with their heat pump than anyhtign because fo the cost with electric supplment during cold months more than the water heater bill.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2010, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Earth
225 posts, read 803,945 times
Reputation: 93
Default Heatpump Water heater

I have one installed in my garage - Rheem. I live in TX and the output being cold air is a good thing for my garage. In my climate according to EPA it is the most effecient means to heat my water. Payoff is about 4 years after tax rebate and electric company rebate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2010, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 33,329,150 times
Reputation: 7038
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe123456 View Post
I have one installed in my garage - Rheem. I live in TX and the output being cold air is a good thing for my garage. In my climate according to EPA it is the most effecient means to heat my water. Payoff is about 4 years after tax rebate and electric company rebate.
This is what really drew me to the heat pump water heater. The idea of having a machine pulling hot air from the attic and exhausting cold air is intriguing. I have some considerable doubts that the unit would be able to keep up with the temperature runaways in the summer, but even a five degree reduction would probably have a measurable impact on my A/C bills.

Does the Rheem seem to keep up with your hot water demand? Has it needed any service? Does it run on 120V or 240V?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2010, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Earth
225 posts, read 803,945 times
Reputation: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
This is what really drew me to the heat pump water heater. The idea of having a machine pulling hot air from the attic and exhausting cold air is intriguing. I have some considerable doubts that the unit would be able to keep up with the temperature runaways in the summer, but even a five degree reduction would probably have a measurable impact on my A/C bills.

Does the Rheem seem to keep up with your hot water demand? Has it needed any service? Does it run on 120V or 240V?

240v just like the water heater it replaced. Although one consideration is how the plumbing is run to the unit. The unit it replaced had lines on top. The rheem has lines near the bottom....so the water heater had to be totally replumbed.

I don't know how feasible the unit is in the attic. However the 1st hour rating on the Rheem is 60+ gallons using a 50 gallon tank. No more than two showers in an hour...you have to wait for the tank to heat more hot water.

No service to date...just check and clean an air filter. Heatpumps usually last a long time 10 years. The warranty on the unit I believe is 8 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top