U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-02-2010, 05:29 PM
 
Location: North Burb Chicago
311 posts, read 1,864,279 times
Reputation: 220
Default Flooring Help: Transition Strips

Hi all.

I'm looking for some expert advice here regarding transition strips between rooms or different flooring.

My understanding is that if you are going from one room to another but it is all the same flooring, you still need a transition strip.
Is this correct?
So if I was going from my kitchen to dining room with all hardwood, I would still need a transition strip between both rooms.

What if I was going from flooring to bare concrete/slab? How does that work?
I'm putting flooring in the basement. When I get to the utility closet, do I need a reducer at the end?

Going from type of flooring to another, how can I achieve this look:





And NOT this look with a t moulding?

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-02-2010, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,577 posts, read 20,171,909 times
Reputation: 5062
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi5 View Post
Hi all.

I'm looking for some expert advice here regarding transition strips between rooms or different flooring.

My understanding is that if you are going from one room to another but it is all the same flooring, you still need a transition strip.
Is this correct?
No. The only reason you would need a "transition strip" is because the flooring was started at two different places- and when they "meet" at a door opening the space is < or > a single wood strip. So, as long as the flooring is started on one wall and carried all the way through there's no need for the strip. Even if the floor joists change direction, you still have the tongue to work off of.
So if I was going from my kitchen to dining room with all hardwood, I would still need a transition strip between both rooms.

What if I was going from flooring to bare concrete/slab? How does that work?
Generally, my hardwood guy would make his own trans-strip by ripping a 45 angle on the finish side. That's for true 3/4" site finished HW. If your talking 1/4" engineered, they make trans-strips specifically for that situation.
I'm putting flooring in the basement. When I get to the utility closet, do I need a reducer at the end?

Going from type of flooring to another, how can I achieve this look:





And NOT this look with a t moulding?
Hope this helps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2010, 11:05 PM
 
109 posts, read 257,460 times
Reputation: 85
You may be confusing laminate flooring with regular or engineered hardwood that is fastened to the floor.
Most manufacturers recommend when installing laminate that transition strips like "T" molding be installed in all the doorways.This is due to the expansion of the product which can lead to the floor buckling.
Regular nailed down hardwood or engineered hardwood do not need transition strips in doorways when joining the same.

As far as the other transition strips you may need, the company that makes the product you purchase will have what you need,most of the time.Reducers for wood to vinyl or cement.One for wood to carpet.ETC.
Have someone from a flooring company come out and measure your floors and look over everything.They should give you the best advice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2010, 06:56 AM
 
1,062 posts, read 1,639,078 times
Reputation: 767
In order to have a reducer (or even just need a reducer) your floor will need to be higher than the other side. Which in your case it sounds like it will be. As said above if you are buying engineered flooring then you can purchase the reducer specifically made for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2010, 03:22 PM
 
Location: North Burb Chicago
311 posts, read 1,864,279 times
Reputation: 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjive View Post
You may be confusing laminate flooring with regular or engineered hardwood that is fastened to the floor.
Most manufacturers recommend when installing laminate that transition strips like "T" molding be installed in all the doorways.This is due to the expansion of the product which can lead to the floor buckling.
Sorry for leaving out what flooring I was looking at.

Yes, I will be working with laminate flooring in the basement.

When I went to Lowes for flooring, the sale rep informed that I would need a transition strip between every room even if it is all the same flooring.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2010, 09:04 AM
 
537 posts, read 1,950,297 times
Reputation: 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi5 View Post
....
When I went to Lowes for flooring, the sale rep informed that I would need a transition strip between every room even if it is all the same flooring.
The salesman is a dope. KBldr got it right.

Regards,
Streamer1212
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2010, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
3,884 posts, read 3,129,938 times
Reputation: 2452
When you went to Lowes for flooring, you talked to someone who was selling garden supplies the week before, and probably appliances the week before that. Get in touch with an actual flooring installer, and talk to them about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2010, 05:29 PM
 
109 posts, read 257,460 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi5 View Post
Sorry for leaving out what flooring I was looking at.

Yes, I will be working with laminate flooring in the basement.

When I went to Lowes for flooring, the sale rep informed that I would need a transition strip between every room even if it is all the same flooring.
...
Jedi.The Lowes guy is correct.
There has been a lot of trouble with the expansion of laminate and the resulting buckling that the manufactures decided to save their butts.That is why most all now say to install "t" molding in all doorways.It takes the pressure off the expansion.
That being said, I have installed plenty without using the "T" transition strips in the doorways and have not had any trouble although I have seen other jobs where they did have trouble.
If you are having it installed in multiple rooms and really large areas I would recommend using the "T" moldings.
If it is just two or three rooms and a hallway and the overall area is not large you may get by without installing them.You will need to get on the installer and make sure they leave plenty of room between the laminate and the baseboard.May work may not.Talk to the installer and get their feel.Also remember the warranty will not cover if you don't go by their guidelines but hey,you have to make you happy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-08-2012, 09:00 AM
 
1 posts, read 18,059 times
Reputation: 11
I need to transition from a curved ceramic tile to hardwood below. About 3/4" drop. Any suggestions?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-08-2012, 12:32 PM
 
41,702 posts, read 46,172,177 times
Reputation: 27274
I just want to comment on the first picture. The flooring was installed wrong. The tile should be further into the doorway. You shouldn't be able to see the wood flooring when the door is closed. To get the proper placement, draw an invisible line when the door is closed. That's where the flooring should change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top