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Old 05-28-2010, 11:06 PM
 
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Is either of the above methods better to install an engineered hardwood floor?
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Old 05-30-2010, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Seaford, Delaware
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There are variables you do not mention. It depends on the surface. What is the subfloor? Concrete does not expand and contract like wood does. The amount of humidy and or dampness on the floor makes a difference. Ask the installer or better yet, ask the manufacturer. Glueing a wood floor to concrete will not allow for the movement of the wood with expansion from temperature and walking.
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Old 05-31-2010, 11:46 PM
 
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I know I have to glue down on the first floor as it is on concrete slab, but I am insisting on nail down for the above floors. Was wondering if I should give glue down a chance there, but I rethought it. Thanks for your response!
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Old 06-01-2010, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
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So if you have a concrete subfloor (first level) it's better to have it glued down to eliminate movement? Will the glue be long lasting and won't allow the floor to pop up over a period of time?

As for the second level, it's better to have it nail down? Do you still put another layer of plywood or just nail it to the existing floor?
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Old 06-01-2010, 11:05 AM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffanyA View Post
Is either of the above methods better to install an engineered hardwood floor?
Are you talking about laminate wood flooring - as in, Pergo or one of the off-brands?

Because if that's what you're talking about, you do NOT attach it to the existing floor.
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Old 06-01-2010, 12:46 PM
 
137 posts, read 567,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omaha Rocks View Post
Are you talking about laminate wood flooring - as in, Pergo or one of the off-brands?

Because if that's what you're talking about, you do NOT attach it to the existing floor.
No, I am using engineered walnut - sorry if that wasn't clear to you. Is engineered hardwood another name for laminate? Is there a better term to use?


Quote:
Originally Posted by EmBee View Post
So if you have a concrete subfloor (first level) it's better to have it glued down to eliminate movement? Will the glue be long lasting and won't allow the floor to pop up over a period of time?

As for the second level, it's better to have it nail down? Do you still put another layer of plywood or just nail it to the existing floor?
If you have a workable wood subfloor, glue down or nail down are preferable to floating, but I am choosing nail down as it's easier to remove. That's the only reason. As I understand it, you do not have to put down another subfloor is you already have one (this is answering your question about the second floor). I think only a floating installation will require underlayment actually.
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Old 06-01-2010, 02:57 PM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 23,452,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffanyA View Post
No, I am using engineered walnut - sorry if that wasn't clear to you. Is engineered hardwood another name for laminate? Is there a better term to use?
No, I just misunderstood.

The problem - partly - is that all kinds of people use different names for the same product. Then you have laminate flooring, which a lot of people call Pergo, much like people use Kleenex to describe all "facial tissues."

So I just didn't catch it. Sorry.
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Old 06-01-2010, 03:22 PM
 
137 posts, read 567,594 times
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Ah, I see the confusion now Thanks for the explanation.
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Old 06-01-2010, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Pomona
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Both methods will work, as long as it's within the manufacturer's recommendations. Nail down at least offers a chance to reuse/reposition the boards later ... glue-down, it's one time and one-time only.

If the manufacturer allows for floating (some engineered woods can), consider that instead glue-down. That way, you can use a moisture resistant underlayment - something you can't with a glue-down.
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Old 06-02-2010, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Narfcake View Post
Both methods will work, as long as it's within the manufacturer's recommendations. Nail down at least offers a chance to reuse/reposition the boards later ... glue-down, it's one time and one-time only.

If the manufacturer allows for floating (some engineered woods can), consider that instead glue-down. That way, you can use a moisture resistant underlayment - something you can't with a glue-down.
By floating, is it the clickable option without glue down? It doesn't sound very secure, especially if your floor is somewhat uneven. Also for the solid hardwood I was told there is a double sided adhesive underlayment that you can use, hence eliminating the need for nail or glue down with moisture barrier.
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