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Old 09-01-2010, 12:25 PM
 
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I am moving to Houston and I heard of the flooding that occurs from time to time and would like to live in a more elevated part of town. I looked for topographical maps but found none I could access right away.
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Old 09-01-2010, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Pearland, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marisa Whitsel View Post
I am moving to Houston and I heard of the flooding that occurs from time to time and would like to live in a more elevated part of town. I looked for topographical maps but found none I could access right away.
Between 40 and 50 feet, depending which part you're standing in.
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Old 09-01-2010, 12:54 PM
 
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You will encounter street flooding no matter where you live. Maybe not on your street but at some point you will be driving home or somewhere and a gully washer will hit flooding the streets.
The Heights is probably the highest place in Houston hence the name. If your looking to buy just dont buy in flood plane and buy flood insurance wherever you end up.
Museum district is a great area and you most likely will not have issues there.
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Old 09-01-2010, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Clear Lake
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Elevation above sea level doesn't mean a whole lot as far as flooding goes around here.
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Old 09-01-2010, 01:29 PM
 
Location: twin towers, dayton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstone View Post
Elevation above sea level doesn't mean a whole lot as far as flooding goes around here.
For that matter, there are parts of Central Texas 200-300 feet above us that can flood worse than much of Houston.

Generally speaking, areas around the bayous lie lower than parts further away. The Museum District is something around 50 feet above sea level, on averagel; go south toward Brays Bayou and that drops some 15-20 feet. Elevation does vary here more than it would appear just driving around town, but it's a very gradual thing. You probably go "downhill" a good 10-15 feet on Main Street between Binz and the Brays without realizing it.
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Old 09-01-2010, 05:19 PM
 
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Yes, flooding occurs in the Museum District! Some years back, Houston had another one of its "Hundred Year Floods" and the Contemporary Arts Museum lost everything in its basement offices, including catalogs of their landmark exhibitions from the 1950's-60's. I was planning to donate the few catalogs I had from that time to help make up their loss, but T.S. Allison came along and wiped out my files, too.
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Old 09-01-2010, 06:15 PM
 
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In normal rain events, Houston streets are designed to be catch basins in times of heavy rain. If you can stay put until 30 minutes after the rain stops and you should be OK. I am not referring to things like hurricanes and Allison.
Flooding can happen suddenly, anywhere at any time.
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Old 09-01-2010, 06:31 PM
 
Location: West Houston
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Just joining the chorus, you really can't predict flooding in Houston based on elevation above sea level, or even on the topographical maps period. There is so much development and the water control has been so engineered and re-engineered that the maps are effectively meaningless.

Generally speaking (broad generalization), if you are directly on a bayou or directly on the coast, your chance of flooding during a "major event" is higher than if you are in other places---but all places in southeast Texas (Houston metro) are subject to flooding.

What you want to do is ask the people directly in the area you are considering about their experiences with flooding. Flooding here is very localized; one side of the street may flood frequently, while the other never does.

Hope this helps.
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Old 09-01-2010, 06:41 PM
 
Location: #
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The Ashby high rise should be above sea level. The only problem is that the rest of the neighborhood will treat you as though you are beneath them.
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Old 09-01-2010, 06:48 PM
 
Location: twin towers, dayton
11,894 posts, read 21,965,771 times
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Really, most any place near a body of water can flood. Look at what's happened recently in Iowa and North Dakota.
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