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Old 01-02-2011, 10:53 PM
 
12,671 posts, read 20,487,421 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darbro View Post
Why do you say that? What kinds of cities are they?
Heavily Caucasian dominated. They are great suburbs to live in though. Conroe is in the country and quite away from the city.
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Old 01-03-2011, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Charleston Sc and Western NC
9,274 posts, read 22,765,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas User View Post
The Woodlands and Conroe is NOT diverse.

I'm always so curious when people say this. When I lived up there for a little over a year, my street had all races and creeds. Same with other streets up there I visited.
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Old 01-03-2011, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Sugar Land
145 posts, read 333,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EasilyAmused View Post
I'm always so curious when people say this. When I lived up there for a little over a year, my street had all races and creeds. Same with other streets up there I visited.
With its proximity to the airport and strong local amenities, The Woodlands is a big draw for international families, including many Latin Americans from Venezuela, Mexico, and elsewhere. While it may not be as ethnically diverse as Katy, Sugar Land, or the inner-loop, the fact that some locals refer to this area as the whitelands tells you all you need to know about metro-Houston's abundant cultural diversity.
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Old 01-03-2011, 01:15 PM
 
12,671 posts, read 20,487,421 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EasilyAmused View Post
I'm always so curious when people say this. When I lived up there for a little over a year, my street had all races and creeds. Same with other streets up there I visited.
The Woodlands is slowly becoming diverse.
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Old 01-03-2011, 01:40 PM
 
1,234 posts, read 3,664,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LongIslandPerson View Post
Price range is up to $150,000. 200k tops
If you are handy and plan to invest in your property, you can get inside or near the loop in a diverse area that will see appreciation in the coming years. However, you really have to be comfortable with having an old home that will need renovating.
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Old 06-17-2011, 06:25 PM
 
4 posts, read 13,159 times
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Many people in Houston don't know how to answer a question on the topic of diversity. Some people avoid it altogether, and some assume neighborhoods are just as diverse as the racial make up of the metro area. The fact of the matter is Houston is only diverse when observing the overall racial makeup, but neighborhoods in Houston are very diverse. The true diverse areas are parts of Ft. Bend (along Westpark) and Ft. Bend only. Check out the link, its a map of the racial divide in Houston. The "white flight phenomenon is most evident in the West side of Houston. This is something I paid attention to while in college here in Houston as I was a Sociology major. Houston is very much divided.

Infographic of Houston’s Race and Ethnic Divides « Robert S. "Bob" Lowery
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Old 06-19-2011, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,902,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neaux2135 View Post
Many people in Houston don't know how to answer a question on the topic of diversity. Some people avoid it altogether, and some assume neighborhoods are just as diverse as the racial make up of the metro area. The fact of the matter is Houston is only diverse when observing the overall racial makeup, but neighborhoods in Houston are very diverse. The true diverse areas are parts of Ft. Bend (along Westpark) and Ft. Bend only. Check out the link, its a map of the racial divide in Houston. The "white flight phenomenon is most evident in the West side of Houston. This is something I paid attention to while in college here in Houston as I was a Sociology major. Houston is very much divided.

Infographic of Houston’s Race and Ethnic Divides « Robert S. "Bob" Lowery
But when you compare that map to other maps from different cities, you will see why many say Houston is not as segregated compared to them. Nobody is saying Houston is fully integrated. It's just not as segregated as most cities.
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Old 06-19-2011, 02:29 PM
 
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Diversity is subjective. People say Ft. Bend is diverse but there is a "type" when you say diversity. Diversity as in "who" 20 White/20Black/20Hispanic/20Asian/20Middle Eastern and so forth is true diversity to me but many areas that people say are diverse look like 50/30/15/5.

That's not very evenly spread to me because those 15 and 5 are small numbers and in some areas it feels even smaller when Houston is such a spread out city so all 5 percent or 15 or whatever aren't right there together and everywhere.

It doesn't mean an even mixture of every ethnicity. And when people say a diverse minority area you have to be specific on what minority you're asking about.
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:09 PM
 
Location: North Downtown Houston (Northside Village)
157 posts, read 479,052 times
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I used to have the same point of view about "cookie-cutter houses." My parent's live in a newer, master planned neighborhood, and all the houses look the same. Then, I started looking to restore an old bungalow from the 20's or 30's ... and found they share common characteristics too. House hunting got a little confusing! You might notice many houses from the 50's look the same too. And of course, many houses built in the 60's-70's look like they were built in that decade.
That's just the way they built back then.. there's nothing cookie cutter about it unless you look at it that way.
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