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Old 01-06-2011, 05:48 PM
 
Location: West Houston
1,075 posts, read 2,472,613 times
Reputation: 1389

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First, I think your comment in your original post was the right place to start: plan a visit first, get a feel for the city, and see if you even like it. Many don't, many others of us would rather live here than anywhere else. "Your mileage may vary."

Schools here run the entire gamut. We have everything from gang-infested hellholes to creme-de-la-creme elite, just like NYC. HISD is ok in spots, rugged in others. If you're "Inside the Loop", you're in HISD. (ISD = "Independent School District"--the schools in Texas are not affiliated with the City governments, ergo "Independent").

Just like anywhere else, your problem is going to be narrowing your scope on a variety of items. "Houston" is as varied a subject as "New York" (I've lived in both). What is New York to you? To me, it's the Upper West Side where I lived; Lincoln Center, Broadway, Times Square, Macy's, Bloomingdales, the Park, the Museums, and the Mets (screw the Yankees all the way to Hell and back). To others, NY is the East Side, or Harlem, or Queens, or Brooklyn, or one of the burbs.

Houston's got a lot of diversity as well, from the tree-lined avenues of the super-rich in River Oaks and Memorial to the harshness of the Kashmere Gardens area to the coastal areas of Clear Lake and Kemah to the Texas Prairie areas of Katy and Sugar Land to the East Texas Piney Woods of The Woodlands, Conroe, Kingwood, Atascocita---it's pretty diverse.

There's no "city" like Manhattan; the "downtown" district (Houston has 5 distinct skylines: Downtown, Galleria, Medical Center, Greenway Plaza, Greenspoint; additionally, there are several areas that could become skylines in the future, like the Energy Corridor) is a business district with some nice restaurants, the baseball park, etc. So most of what we think of as "city", Manhattanites would think of as "suburban".

You'll have to decide if the extra space you could get in the burbs (and probably better schools *GENERALLY*--meaning that's a broad generalization, "better schools in the burbs") would justify the additional time and expense of commuting; likewise, would the closeness of living "Inside the Loop" justify the reduction in square footage you'd have to take? (My neighborhood is very nice, for example, and $250,000 will buy you a 2500 square foot 4 bedroom house here--I'm in West Houston, between Westchase and the Energy Corridor. Lots of restaurants, nice schools, nice neighbors---17 miles from downtown. But, I don't work "downtown" any more, so I could care less. Everything here is spread out. I'd rather live and work out here, and run into "town" when I want to go to a baseball game or the theater or opera or whatever. Again, "your mileage may vary").

Come on down, look around, enjoy the hospitality, eat some Mexican food and seafood (local specialties), get a feel for the place.

You just might like it. And, welcome!
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Old 01-06-2011, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
8 posts, read 11,846 times
Reputation: 17
We are definitely coming down for a visit either this summer or fall. I guess for me what it boils down to is I'm a planner and like having as much information as possible. It's like even with visiting several times it's good to know where to begin looking and what to look for.

Hello to a fellow Mets fan!

I'm definitely not looking for anyplace like NYC so I'm happy to hear it's far removed from that. I'm born and bred in NY and have lived in the Bronx, Brooklyn and Manhattan so I can't really say what NY is to me because its so many things.

I can't wait to visit. And I really can't wait to try the Mexican and seafood since they are two of my favorites!
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Old 01-06-2011, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Westbury
3,283 posts, read 4,908,522 times
Reputation: 2922
you can try mexican-seafood while you are at it!

large GLBT population here, many families, many social groups for GLBT families and kids. big nightlife as well. you didn't ask that question, but someone brought it up

if your partner is planning on working on their MSW in NY they would need to take their licensing exam here in TX. license won't transfer otherwise. the social work area in houston is large as well, getting licensed is highly recommended as is brushing up on foreign language skills
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,339 posts, read 2,218,473 times
Reputation: 2363
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malvie View Post
First, I think your comment in your original post was the right place to start: plan a visit first, get a feel for the city, and see if you even like it. Many don't, many others of us would rather live here than anywhere else. "Your mileage may vary."

Schools here run the entire gamut. We have everything from gang-infested hellholes to creme-de-la-creme elite, just like NYC. HISD is ok in spots, rugged in others. If you're "Inside the Loop", you're in HISD. (ISD = "Independent School District"--the schools in Texas are not affiliated with the City governments, ergo "Independent").

Just like anywhere else, your problem is going to be narrowing your scope on a variety of items. "Houston" is as varied a subject as "New York" (I've lived in both). What is New York to you? To me, it's the Upper West Side where I lived; Lincoln Center, Broadway, Times Square, Macy's, Bloomingdales, the Park, the Museums, and the Mets (screw the Yankees all the way to Hell and back). To others, NY is the East Side, or Harlem, or Queens, or Brooklyn, or one of the burbs.

Houston's got a lot of diversity as well, from the tree-lined avenues of the super-rich in River Oaks and Memorial to the harshness of the Kashmere Gardens area to the coastal areas of Clear Lake and Kemah to the Texas Prairie areas of Katy and Sugar Land to the East Texas Piney Woods of The Woodlands, Conroe, Kingwood, Atascocita---it's pretty diverse.

There's no "city" like Manhattan; the "downtown" district (Houston has 5 distinct skylines: Downtown, Galleria, Medical Center, Greenway Plaza, Greenspoint; additionally, there are several areas that could become skylines in the future, like the Energy Corridor) is a business district with some nice restaurants, the baseball park, etc. So most of what we think of as "city", Manhattanites would think of as "suburban".

You'll have to decide if the extra space you could get in the burbs (and probably better schools *GENERALLY*--meaning that's a broad generalization, "better schools in the burbs") would justify the additional time and expense of commuting; likewise, would the closeness of living "Inside the Loop" justify the reduction in square footage you'd have to take? (My neighborhood is very nice, for example, and $250,000 will buy you a 2500 square foot 4 bedroom house here--I'm in West Houston, between Westchase and the Energy Corridor. Lots of restaurants, nice schools, nice neighbors---17 miles from downtown. But, I don't work "downtown" any more, so I could care less. Everything here is spread out. I'd rather live and work out here, and run into "town" when I want to go to a baseball game or the theater or opera or whatever. Again, "your mileage may vary").

Come on down, look around, enjoy the hospitality, eat some Mexican food and seafood (local specialties), get a feel for the place.

You just might like it. And, welcome!
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayeP View Post
We are definitely coming down for a visit either this summer or fall. I guess for me what it boils down to is I'm a planner and like having as much information as possible. It's like even with visiting several times it's good to know where to begin looking and what to look for.

Hello to a fellow Mets fan!

I'm definitely not looking for anyplace like NYC so I'm happy to hear it's far removed from that. I'm born and bred in NY and have lived in the Bronx, Brooklyn and Manhattan so I can't really say what NY is to me because its so many things.

I can't wait to visit. And I really can't wait to try the Mexican and seafood since they are two of my favorites!






Malvie, as usual a spot on awesome post. I got to spread more rep around before I can hit you again. JayeP, yall will love it here.
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Old 01-11-2011, 10:47 AM
 
29 posts, read 77,533 times
Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malvie View Post
First, I think your comment in your original post was the right place to start: plan a visit first, get a feel for the city, and see if you even like it. Many don't, many others of us would rather live here than anywhere else. "Your mileage may vary."

Schools here run the entire gamut. We have everything from gang-infested hellholes to creme-de-la-creme elite, just like NYC. HISD is ok in spots, rugged in others. If you're "Inside the Loop", you're in HISD. (ISD = "Independent School District"--the schools in Texas are not affiliated with the City governments, ergo "Independent").

Just like anywhere else, your problem is going to be narrowing your scope on a variety of items. "Houston" is as varied a subject as "New York" (I've lived in both). What is New York to you? To me, it's the Upper West Side where I lived; Lincoln Center, Broadway, Times Square, Macy's, Bloomingdales, the Park, the Museums, and the Mets (screw the Yankees all the way to Hell and back). To others, NY is the East Side, or Harlem, or Queens, or Brooklyn, or one of the burbs.

Houston's got a lot of diversity as well, from the tree-lined avenues of the super-rich in River Oaks and Memorial to the harshness of the Kashmere Gardens area to the coastal areas of Clear Lake and Kemah to the Texas Prairie areas of Katy and Sugar Land to the East Texas Piney Woods of The Woodlands, Conroe, Kingwood, Atascocita---it's pretty diverse.

There's no "city" like Manhattan; the "downtown" district (Houston has 5 distinct skylines: Downtown, Galleria, Medical Center, Greenway Plaza, Greenspoint; additionally, there are several areas that could become skylines in the future, like the Energy Corridor) is a business district with some nice restaurants, the baseball park, etc. So most of what we think of as "city", Manhattanites would think of as "suburban".

You'll have to decide if the extra space you could get in the burbs (and probably better schools *GENERALLY*--meaning that's a broad generalization, "better schools in the burbs") would justify the additional time and expense of commuting; likewise, would the closeness of living "Inside the Loop" justify the reduction in square footage you'd have to take? (My neighborhood is very nice, for example, and $250,000 will buy you a 2500 square foot 4 bedroom house here--I'm in West Houston, between Westchase and the Energy Corridor. Lots of restaurants, nice schools, nice neighbors---17 miles from downtown. But, I don't work "downtown" any more, so I could care less. Everything here is spread out. I'd rather live and work out here, and run into "town" when I want to go to a baseball game or the theater or opera or whatever. Again, "your mileage may vary").

Come on down, look around, enjoy the hospitality, eat some Mexican food and seafood (local specialties), get a feel for the place.

You just might like it. And, welcome!
Hi Malvie,
I am planning to move to Houston this March/April. I like the West of Houston, I am looking for housing in this area. Would you please to give me some advices: which area of West of Houston that I should avoid?
Thank you,
Mario
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Old 01-12-2011, 06:33 AM
 
Location: West Houston
1,075 posts, read 2,472,613 times
Reputation: 1389
Quote:
Originally Posted by 73Tele View Post
Hi Malvie,
I am planning to move to Houston this March/April. I like the West of Houston, I am looking for housing in this area. Would you please to give me some advices: which area of West of Houston that I should avoid?
Thank you,
Mario
As I say to everybody else: What is your budget? Schools a requirement? Where do you work? ("West Houston" is a pretty big area).

Generally, very generally, stay north of Westheimer. Lots of very nice people live in Alief, it has had some issues in the past. Generally, stay south of 290 if you're inside the Beltway (outside the Beltway, Jersey Village is very nice; all those areas are, JV, Copperfield, all very nice.

Again, very generally, the further west you go, the cheaper the housing gets.

Without some specifics, I can't get more specific. But thanks for asking!
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Old 01-12-2011, 08:43 AM
 
1,580 posts, read 2,852,078 times
Reputation: 2143
Rent as close to the center of town as you can afford, people have listed some neighborhoods above. Check things out, talk to people.

When you look to buy, in that budget I'd look in the north, Heights-area neighborhoods, and to the southwest around Westbury (though you would need to magnet into HSPVA; Westbury high isn't very good). Good schools available in both neighborhoods, plus more diversity and open minds than you might find in other parts of Houston. Schools vary within a close proximity so pay attention to the school profiles before you buy.
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