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Old 11-22-2011, 12:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by HoustonRonnie View Post
LOL, what the heck? Man, you must be from Alabama.

Ronnie
No, I'm from Louisiana.
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Old 11-22-2011, 12:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
Houston is just too big for anything near it to compete. The Woodlands is going to get better, no doubts about it, but it is just too small and too far to give any competition. With the new Exxon plant between The Woodlands and Spring, the area is gonna get killer, but Houston is just too much of a beast to be worried.
Also, The Woodlands seems (from my reading, of course) like it is its own city doing its own thing.
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Old 11-22-2011, 12:48 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
The situation with DFW is sticky. Houston City definitely feels bigger than Dallas city because... well it is. Even if you shrink Houston's City limits to the size of Dallas city limits you still get more people. Remember the thread Danny made where Houston caught up to Dallas's population in just about 125 sq miles?

anyway, where it gets difficult is looking at the metro as a whole, DFW with all of the sum of the parts feels as big as Houston, but in the collective. Because it is collective it does not seem as cohesive.

When we say that Houston's Metro is just Houston, we don't only mean that there isn't a joint city like in the Bay or Miami or whereever. What we mean is that Houston and its ETJ has over 4M people. The metro is simply Houston closely pimpled by small suburbs. So radiating from the core it is basically Houston for ever.

The case with DFW is that they have powerful burbs. Big burbs. Nationally known burbs. While Houston may have the Galveston and TW, FW, Plano, Irving etc are hard to ignore.

Even breaking it down to metro divisions, Houston's home county is just as the entire 8 county Dallas-Irving-Plano metropolitan Division. (FYI, in the 90's Houston, Pearland, Galveston etc were all different metro areas, they were combined in 2000, but they are too small to be considered a metro division, because quite frankly the draw is just Houston).

Jobs, are centered around Houston or withing 5 miles away from it (few exceptions). I don't see this changing anytime soon because Houston's ETJ is so large. I think the only it will change is if Houston releases those 1.6M people that are in its ETJ. This would instantly lock in Houston in all directions and create monster burbs in Katy, Cypress, Spring, Humble and Atascocita.

People say that city limits mean nothing but it actually is very important. Government funding is dependent on population. Tax base, city services, etc.

anyway, Houston only feels bigger than DFW in terms of development immediately around the City. DFW as a collection of cities feel as big as the one big city
I disagree here. Collectively, yes, DFW is pretty much the same size as Houston and it does feel big, but there is not enough consistent density to make it feel as big as Houston. It's disjointed. Each area (Fort Worth, Dallas, Irving) feels like they are on an island. Almost like you have to drive through a small patch of "the middle of nowhere" before you reach the next big suburb/city. You don't get that feel that you're in one big city, just a collection of cities that are close together. So because of that, it doesn't feel as big. North Dallas and the North Dallas suburbs are the only area where it doesn't feel like this happens.
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Old 11-22-2011, 12:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Trae713 View Post
I disagree here. Collectively, yes, DFW is pretty much the same size as Houston and it does feel big, but there is not enough consistent density to make it feel as big as Houston. It's disjointed. Each area (Fort Worth, Dallas, Irving) feels like they are on an island. Almost like you have to drive through a small patch of "the middle of nowhere" before you reach the next big suburb/city. You don't get that feel that you're in one big city, just a collection of cities that are close together. So because of that, it doesn't feel as big. North Dallas and the North Dallas suburbs are the only area where it doesn't feel like this happens.
When I look at those videos on youtube, I can see exactly what you are talking about. Houston looks very similar to LA also.
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Old 11-22-2011, 12:57 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
no, quite the opposite.

Flat areas are hard to take it in as a whole.

Besides, DFW is not as hilly as they make it out to seem. Yes it does have more hills than Houston, but it is not very hilly.

Again what separates the two is that Dallas is not the sole center of attention in the metro.
DFW is surprisingly hilly. Depends on what areas you're in (North Dallas suburbs are pretty flat until you get to McKinney). But everywhere else is pretty hilly and you get good views of DFW from various places. The Fort Worth side especially is pretty hilly, more than the Dallas side. There is a good mix of flat and hilly in DFW. I guess rolling terrain is a better way to put it. The terrain rolls just enough to where many people (at least some of the friends I knew back in high school in Arlington) had basements because of the way their homes were situated. But you'll be surprised just driving around DFW how much the terrain rolls. Maybe it's just because I grew up in Houston, where my driveway was considered a hill.
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Old 11-22-2011, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 20,080,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trae713 View Post
I disagree here. Collectively, yes, DFW is pretty much the same size as Houston and it does feel big, but there is not enough consistent density to make it feel as big as Houston. It's disjointed. Each area (Fort Worth, Dallas, Irving) feels like they are on an island. Almost like you have to drive through a small patch of "the middle of nowhere" before you reach the next big suburb/city. You don't get that feel that you're in one big city, just a collection of cities that are close together. So because of that, it doesn't feel as big. North Dallas and the North Dallas suburbs are the only area where it doesn't feel like this happens.
This.

There is a certain energy and vibe to the inner loop than you won't find anywhere in the DFW area. The feeling of being in the midst of everything is what I'm talking about; the city revolves around the loop. When you're outside of the loop; that feeling is lost [imo].
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
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Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
Also, The Woodlands seems (from my reading, of course) like it is its own city doing its own thing.
For now it is an unincorporated neighborhood in Houston's ETJ.
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
For now it is an unincorporated neighborhood in Houston's ETJ.
If it incorporates, I think it would become a hell of a city.
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,515 posts, read 16,632,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trae713 View Post
I disagree here. Collectively, yes, DFW is pretty much the same size as Houston and it does feel big, but there is not enough consistent density to make it feel as big as Houston. It's disjointed. Each area (Fort Worth, Dallas, Irving) feels like they are on an island. Almost like you have to drive through a small patch of "the middle of nowhere" before you reach the next big suburb/city. You don't get that feel that you're in one big city, just a collection of cities that are close together. So because of that, it doesn't feel as big. North Dallas and the North Dallas suburbs are the only area where it doesn't feel like this happens.
Yes, hun, that is what I am saying.

They are disjointed, instead of the growth radiating from the central city.

It is like having one pound of cupcakes on a plate (DFW) next to a plate with one cake that weighs a pound (Houston) and asking a kid to pick the bigger cake. Of course the kid is gonna pick the one cake that weighs the pound instead of picking threw the cupcakes to find a big one.
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Pearland, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
If it incorporates, I think it would become a hell of a city.

George Mitchell would roll over in his grave.

Ronnie
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