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Old 02-23-2012, 10:03 AM
 
413 posts, read 979,662 times
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Hi All,

Need some quick and urgent help. We just bought a new home which is under construction and need to finalize some things really quickly.

We were planning on having tile flooring thoughout the first floor but some friends tell me it's not good for resale and will give it an old spanish look (I don't know what he meant by that).

My wife loves hardwood floors but they come at double the price. The builder is charging 14K for what should be 7K for top of the line in a 4000 sq ft (entry, dining and familiy, the kitchen and breakfast will have tiles and the master bedroom will have carpet). This is a 400K house in cypress and i'm talking just about the first floor. Upstairs is all carpet.

1.) Should we install laminate and rip it off once the closing is done and do the hardwood by ourselves?

2.) Are hardwood floors good for houston weather. A friend from Florida tells me he'd never get hardwood because of the humidity in FL.

3.) Are tile floors in dining, entry and familiy really bad for resale?

Thanks yall.
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Old 02-23-2012, 10:57 AM
 
2,262 posts, read 5,654,816 times
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I have all tile in my house (except bedrooms and media room - they are carpet). The dining room and study have engineered hardwood flooring. This is what they builder was offering when we built. I wanted hard wood throughout, but it was just too expensive for us at the time. We have a 3,000sqft house, and 85% of it's tile.

I dislike having tile throughout - but it's great when you have young children or dogs. They really can't destroy a tile floor. So if we stay in this house, we will wait til our youngest is older and probably replace the tile with hardwood (engineered). I find having tile really hard on my feet and back. I find it a bit "cold" looking as well. Rugs only go so far!

I will say we had a leak in our masterbath shower (connecting wall with the study) that we didn't realize because it was in the wall. It was going of for a while, and when our house was 6 months old, we had to have the master bath shower totally redone and half of the wood floor in the study needed to be replaced due to water damage. It just got darker slowly over time and we really didn't notice it. Luckily it was all taken care of by the builder. So you might want to take warranty into consideration when putting hardwood flooring in yourself.

If you are building a $400k house and looking at resale, I would say yes, people will expect to see hard woods in at least some of those areas (family and dining). And tile flooring only looks "spanish style" if you are putting in some sort of terra cotta style tile. Regular ceramic tile in no way looks "spanish style".

I've heard engineered hardwoods are better for humid climates vs "real" hard wood flooring, and it looks just like hardwood floors, and is a lot better than any laminate than I have seen.
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Old 02-23-2012, 11:42 AM
 
1,234 posts, read 3,664,036 times
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Hardwood floors have been around Houston as long as homes have been, and they hold up to our humidity just fine. It's all about the quality of installation. I agree that from a resale standpoint you will take a hit if you have too much tile, so I would limit it to entry, kitchen, and bathrooms--and not a square foot more. If cost is that much of a concern, have them roll out carpet in some areas, and replace with wood later.
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Old 02-23-2012, 11:43 AM
 
413 posts, read 979,662 times
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I'm concerned about the flow of the tiles, hardwood and carpet if you have all three. Does it really blend in well with eah other?

We have a young one and she throws her toys on the floor all day long so I'm sure there will be knicks and scratches on the hadwood floor.

Are tiles all over on the first floor considered not that good in Houston?

How much does solid hardwood or re-engineered hardwood cost including installation and sealing etc per sq ft?
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Old 02-23-2012, 12:02 PM
 
Location: plano
5,953 posts, read 7,492,992 times
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I put hardwood floors down throughout my downstairs (FR, Kit, Brk, Dining, MBR) and my gameroom upstairs. I did it a few years before I sold the home and wish I had done it long ago now. We loved the look and had no issues with it. Many recommended against having it in the kitchen. Consumers reports rated the wood floor (A bamboo product which in the stain I got looked like an oak or other hardwood floor) I got as best for a kitchen floor.

Bamboo grows in water so it is more resistant to water issues than most hardwoods. But dont think for a minute you could have water run on the floor and left on it a while without damage.

My current home in Plano had mostly handscraped wood floors downstairs, other than Bedrooms. I installed hardwood in the bedrooms too and again love the look and wear it can handle. We have handscraped hardwood here so it shows nothing.

I cant recall what I spend per sf so the price is not something I can react to.

Would they leave those floors uncovered and give you a reduced home price to reflect the savings? If so you could control what wood goes down and have it installed yourself before move in.

We are very happy with our decision to go wood floors.
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Old 02-23-2012, 12:11 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
366 posts, read 887,204 times
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We are renting a house with tile in the family room and the tile gives the room a cold, clinical feeling. It also shows much more dirt (esp. if its a light color and in the grout). I think hardwood is much more warm and inviting. Also, when you drop delicate things on the tile they easily break.

However, when we had hardwood in a previous house, our kids really did a lot of damage with their toys on that floor.
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Old 02-23-2012, 12:21 PM
 
1,649 posts, read 3,045,767 times
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If you dont want to pay the builder for the floor, just have them install whatever the default zero cost flooring is (carpet?) and rip it out after you close.
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Old 02-23-2012, 12:29 PM
 
Location: plano
5,953 posts, read 7,492,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houstmom View Post
We are renting a house with tile in the family room and the tile gives the room a cold, clinical feeling. It also shows much more dirt (esp. if its a light color and in the grout). I think hardwood is much more warm and inviting. Also, when you drop delicate things on the tile they easily break.

However, when we had hardwood in a previous house, our kids really did a lot of damage with their toys on that floor.
I didnt mention about the hardwood looking bamboo product, but Consumers rated it the hardest wood floor they recommend so it will resist some denting but be clear, the floor will dent if hit hard... we hit the sample piece of wood with a hammer and it made a nice big dent! We have no kids at home so less an issue to us
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Old 02-23-2012, 12:34 PM
 
27,448 posts, read 44,947,050 times
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we have house in DFW area that is about 7 yrs old--second owner
we have tile, hardwood, carpet in various areas
while I agree that wood would look better in most rooms I don't mind the variety--
and I do like tile in traffic patterns and wet areas
I don't know that I would want wood in a kitchen

we have a brick tiled area off the front hall where one garage comes into the house
wood in front hall and study
tile in utility, baths, kitchen and hall areas downstairs
with carpet in bedrooms up and down
carpet is kind of neutral berber
tile is neutral and in two sizes--half bath has 12 inch vs larger format in other areas

it is cheaper to lay carpet than tile--but doubt the builder would lay carpet in areas like front hall or kitchen if you knew you wanted to take it out for hardwoods
some places won't give occupancy sign off to homes that have just cement foundation showing as flooring
maybe they can leave it like that and take off total price of house...
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Old 02-23-2012, 12:34 PM
cla
 
898 posts, read 2,886,796 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smuggy_mba View Post
I'm concerned about the flow of the tiles, hardwood and carpet if you have all three. Does it really blend in well with eah other?

We have a young one and she throws her toys on the floor all day long so I'm sure there will be knicks and scratches on the hadwood floor.

Are tiles all over on the first floor considered not that good in Houston?

How much does solid hardwood or re-engineered hardwood cost including installation and sealing etc per sq ft?
When I was looking at homes, many, if not most had tile throughout the first floor (carpeting in bedrooms on the first floor), but this was in neighborhoods with houses under 2700 s.f. - starter homes in large MPCs - lol. Mostly young families who probably favor tile for durability.

In move up homes, I would expect wood over tile. You really need to look at what is standard for the neighborhood you are moving into. If wood is expected, get wood. If you are worried about the builder's markup as well as durability because of young children, you could put tile in bathrooms and kitchen now, and install carpet everywhere else. Down the line you can have hardwoods replace the carpet in the living areas. If tile is the norm for your neighborhood, definitely go with larger upgraded tile - 12" for bathrooms only.

I personally do not like the raised transition pieces that are installed where tile meets wood. Tile and wood can be installed nicely side-by-side without an additional transition piece, but you probably aren't going to get that done through a builder.

As far as flow with three different materials - in a large, open area I would say it would look odd, but if the carpeted areas are in the bedrooms only, I think that looks fine.
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