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Old 06-26-2012, 06:00 AM
 
982 posts, read 1,037,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric3781 View Post
Not offended.

My point is that having a robust subway system doesn't say anything about how enjoyable it is to visit or live in a city.
Actually it does. When visiting another city, the last thing you'd want to do is endure hours stuck in traffic in a rental car because the city that you're visiting doesn't have adequate mass transportation.
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Old 06-26-2012, 08:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yonkers View Post
No terribly expensive? Every city on that list is super duper expensive, except Houston. According to Mercer, which ranks costs of living globally, here is how those cities rank:

Paris - 37th globally
San Francisco - 90th globally (3rd in US)
New York - 33rd globally (top in US)
London - 25th globally
Singapore - 6th globally
Houston - 144th globally (11th in US)
Perhaps go back and read the comment. The poster did not say that the cities were not expensive. He said that TAKING A TAXI is not terribly expensive. For example, the most expensive city on your list is Singapore. It is true that Singapore is expensive for housing, automobiles and other things. However, you can get to most places that you'd like to go in Singapore by taxi for under $5.
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Old 06-26-2012, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 29,779,743 times
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It always leave me wondering that the main people who gripe about the lack of public transportation be the same ones complaing about the weather here and saying how they hate being outside. Kinda contradicting themselves.
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Old 06-26-2012, 08:20 AM
 
235 posts, read 688,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIBS98 View Post
Perhaps go back and read the comment. The poster did not say that the cities were not expensive. He said that TAKING A TAXI is not terribly expensive. For example, the most expensive city on your list is Singapore. It is true that Singapore is expensive for housing, automobiles and other things. However, you can get to most places that you'd like to go in Singapore by taxi for under $5.
Sorry. You're correct that I misread that.
However, based on the list of those cities it is interesting that urban density does seem to bring with it a marked increase in cost of living. Do you think that is a supply/demand thing or something else inherent in stacking people on top of each other?
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Old 06-26-2012, 10:26 AM
 
613 posts, read 855,661 times
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First, as someone else pointed out, you have to be very careful about what it is the numbers are reporting. Of the cities you listed, Houston is by far the most sprawling. If you drew a line around the true equivalent city center (I-610 would be a good line) then you'd see Houston shoot up on the list. With the exception of Singapore (space limited by virtue of being an island), all the other cities on that list have suburbs which are considerably less expensive than the city center. I daresay, however, that even like-for-like on the suburban front, the cities on your list will look more expensive.

Next, you have to look at relative income. In most of those cities you list out, the average household income is higher than Houston. Is it a chicken and egg thing - is it more expensive because people earn more and therefore can spend more or do people earn more because it is more expensive. The exception is Singapore. Singaporeans can actually live quite cheaply. The high ranking really pertains to the cost associated with being an expat or a wealthy Singaporean.

Then, you get into desirability, available space, etc., etc. Make Houston itself easier and more desirable to live in, more people will move in, yes prices will go up. You see that neighborhood by neighborhood. The Heights, for example, is an area where prices have gone up by quite a bit in the past 10 years.
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Old 06-26-2012, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Boston
701 posts, read 1,207,421 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by casimpso View Post
I totally agree with you. IMO, mass transit would be fine for to/from work M-F (unless it rains). As an augment to a car. But mass transit without a car?

I often wonder how people who live in these large cities without a car are able to shop. Just last weekend, I needed a case of Ozarka, a 12-pack of toilet paper, an 8-pack of paper towels, two large bags of dog food, a 24-pack of Mountain Dew, and numerous other food and personal items, which filled the cart to capacity.

Do they have to pay considerable sums of money to have this stuff delivered to them? And then have to tip too?
I tend to make more trips to the store in a month to in order to make the amount of food/stuff I have to take home more manageable. I also bring very large reusable bags that I know I am able to carry even when full. Also, in larger cities, corner stores like CVS/Walgreens are usually within walking distance so you can easily pop down to the store if you need shampoo/soap/etc.

I grew up with my mom's SUV hauling food from HEB and supplies from Walmart, and now I don't have that resource anymore. You adapt.
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Old 06-26-2012, 07:29 PM
 
14,806 posts, read 18,801,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
I've lived in New Orleans and Phoenix and a few other smaller cities. As far as living in a rural environment. Don't knock it until you have tried it. LOL

20yrsinBranson
You talk about it as if it's the greatest thing in the World.
If you are lucky (not likely to happen) you'll live in a place with lots of hills, creeks, lakes, etc.
But most "rural people" in the Midwest live in a flatland 1-4 hours away from a city with only Wal-mart and Kmart to do shopping.
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