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Old 08-23-2012, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Houston (Memorial) and Western NC
8,801 posts, read 14,384,180 times
Reputation: 3935
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas7 View Post
Do they still spray by truck? I haven't seen that in years.
They go down our street about twice a week, have for years. Actually, compared to last year, the mosquitos arent that bad around here. Last year when it rained just a little during the drought was the worst Ive seen.
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Old 08-23-2012, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,683 posts, read 2,889,257 times
Reputation: 1207
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas7 View Post
Do they still spray by truck? I haven't seen that in years.
We have trucks that come around our neighborhood.

They do the aeral spraying (and truck spraying) at night when 95% of the population is at home asleep in their beds. When I have insomnia, I hear the mosquito truck pass by, usually around 2-3am.
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Old 08-23-2012, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
9,997 posts, read 9,046,200 times
Reputation: 5423
Is there any numbers of how effective spraying is?
Or are we just shooting mosquitoes in the dark hoping that we kill some?

Are we killing 25, 50, 75% of them? or just shooting in the dark? (have no idea of what we are doing)
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:00 AM
 
1,287 posts, read 3,280,133 times
Reputation: 672
Quote:
Originally Posted by ComeAtMe View Post
Pretty much, or stand outside and let the mist from the spray cool you off.
This was the problem with DDT. One of the best insecticides ever invented. We just over sprayed it. Kids would actually run behind the trucks and play in the mist.

Then someone published a study that showed a correlation between when we started using DDT and cancer rising. We ban DDT, cancer rates continue to rise, destroying the correlation, and tens of millions of people have died in Africa from mosquito born illnesses that would have been prevented by DDT.
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
9,997 posts, read 9,046,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supermac34 View Post
tens of millions of people have died in Africa from mosquito born illnesses that would have been prevented by DDT.
What a joke... Now we are going to save people in Africa by spraying DDT.
How about we give them reliable sources of clean water first?
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Old 08-24-2012, 06:50 AM
 
1,941 posts, read 1,446,467 times
Reputation: 2045
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhafer View Post
We have trucks that come around our neighborhood.

They do the aeral spraying (and truck spraying) at night when 95% of the population is at home asleep in their beds. When I have insomnia, I hear the mosquito truck pass by, usually around 2-3am.
Yep. I hear them too after midnight but mostly after 1.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Supermac34 View Post
This was the problem with DDT. One of the best insecticides ever invented. We just over sprayed it. Kids would actually run behind the trucks and play in the mist.

Then someone published a study that showed a correlation between when we started using DDT and cancer rising. We ban DDT, cancer rates continue to rise, destroying the correlation, and tens of millions of people have died in Africa from mosquito born illnesses that would have been prevented by DDT.
Who the crap would let their kids run behind insecticide trucks?
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Old 08-24-2012, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Katy, TX
82 posts, read 86,270 times
Reputation: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopo View Post
Is there any numbers of how effective spraying is?
Or are we just shooting mosquitoes in the dark hoping that we kill some?

Are we killing 25, 50, 75% of them? or just shooting in the dark? (have no idea of what we are doing)
This is just anecdotal, but it seems pretty effective to me. The mosquitoes were pretty bad for about a week in the spring and then my HOA started spraying (by truck) once or twice a week and I haven't seen more than a couple of them since.
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Old 08-24-2012, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
9,997 posts, read 9,046,200 times
Reputation: 5423
Quote:
Originally Posted by DejaBlue View Post
Who the crap would let their kids run behind insecticide trucks?
Same people that would spray a whole city with insecticide
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Old 08-25-2012, 06:26 AM
 
1,159 posts, read 1,618,780 times
Reputation: 715
The Chron on West Nile infections:
Quote:
Less than 1 percent of infected people get West Nile neuroinvasive disease - encephalitis, meningitis or poliomyelitis - which affects the central nervous system. Symptoms include headaches, neck stiffness, eye pain, disorientation, eating abnormalities, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness and paralysis. It can cause long-term disability or death.

Doctors still learning

But knowledge of West Nile neuroinvasive disease is still evolving.

Dr. Kristy Murray, a Baylor Med tropical medicine specialist, found that in some patients the virus keeps replicating in the kidneys long after its initial onset, causing a loss in function.

Frank Spitzenberger, 84, was one of those patients. Infected in Spring Branch in 2002, unable to eat without vomiting, he spent 20 days in the hospital. Years later, he had to go on dialysis, which Murray's team eventually learned was the result of the virus.

"I wish I would have known before," said Spitzenberger.

Still, there are no vaccines to prevent West Nile infections and no medications to treat the disease, which is why doctors urge people to apply repellent, wear long sleeves and pants, avoid going out in the evening and get rid of standing water.
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Old 08-25-2012, 06:55 AM
 
1,159 posts, read 1,618,780 times
Reputation: 715
The statewide body count for West Nile infections has remained relatively low (compared to the worldwide toll for other deadly mosquito-borne diseases like malaria and yellow fever):
Quote:
As of Friday, the state had more than 900 infections, including at least 32 deaths. The virus has sickened two dozen and killed three in Harris County, officials said.
The annual US death toll from West Nile infections has been roughly 100 per year, since the first case stateside was discovered in 2003:
Quote:
As of 2010, there have been 30,491 cases of WNV reported to CDC. Of these, 12650 have resulted in meningitis/encephalitis and 1196 were fatal. CDC estimates that there have been at least 1.5 million infections (82% are asymptomatic) and 341,000 cases of West Nile Fever, but the disease is grossly under reported due to its similarity to other viral infections.
In contrast, malaria and yellow fever, the major mosquito-borne diseases, are said to kill over a million people per year, worldwide:
Quote:
Malaria is an ancient disease probably originating in Africa. The malaria parasite (plasmodium) is transmitted by female Anopheles mosquitoes. The term malaria is derived from the Italian 'mal-aria" or "bad air" because it was thought to come on the wind from swamps and rivers. Scientists conducted much research on the disease during the 1880s and early 1900s. Approximately 40% of the world's population is susceptible to malaria, mostly in the tropical and sub-tropical areas of the world. It was by and large eradicated in the temperate area of the world during the 20th century with the advent of DDT and other organochlorine and organophosphate mosquito control insecticides. However, more than one million deaths and 300 - 500 million cases are still reported annually in the world. It is reported that malaria kills one child every 40 seconds. In the United States malaria affected colonization along the eastern shore and wasn't effectively controlled until the 1940s when the Anopheles mosquitoes were controlled.

Yellow fever, which has a 400-year history, occurs only in tropical areas of Africa and the Americas. It has both an urban and jungle cycle. It is a rare illness of travelers anymore because most countries have regulations and requirements for yellow fever vaccination that must be met prior to entering the country (CDC - 01 This Page Has Moved - DVBD: Home | CDC Yellow Fever). Every year about 200,000 cases occur with 30,000 deaths in 33 countries. It does not occur in Asia. Over the past decade it has become more prevalent. In 2002 one fatal yellow fever death occurred in the United States in an unvaccinated traveler returning from a fishing trip to the Amazon. In May 2003, 178 cases and 27 deaths caused by yellow fever were reported in southern Sudan. In the Americas 226 cases of jungle yellow fever have been reported with 99 deaths.
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